Professionals say the effects of COVID-19 may be long-lasting for some – The Robesonian

Posted: April 28, 2020 at 2:47 am


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April 27, 2020

LUMBERTON Robeson County residents may experience long-term psychological repercussions related to COVID-19, including financial, but local business professionals forecast a rebound in the nations economy soon.

Psychological ramifications of the virus are uncertain, but some research suggests that post-traumatic stress disorder is likely to occur because of COVID-19s impacts, said Ashley Batts Allen, assistant dean of Research for the College of Arts and Sciences at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

The little research we have regarding PTSD suggests that among COVID-19 patients, the prevalence of post-traumatic symptoms is very high, Allen said. I imagine we might also see high rates of PTSD in other groups of people experiencing uncertainty regarding finances, health etc.

The social psychologist said predicting the behaviors of people after the virus subsides can be difficult.

In terms of how we move forward, I think we might be in for a substantial period of time where we arent sure if we are still experiencing the trauma or if we are trying to move past it, Allen said. Ive done a substantial amount of research on self-compassion and I believe adopting a self-compassionate mindset will be critical for people as they move forward.

Allen defines self-compassion as extending kindness and understanding to ones self as a means of coping. People who are more compassionate to themselves are less likely to develop anxiety, depression or PTSD, she said.

In general, a self-compassionate person will cope more effectively with the trauma we are currently experiencing, Allen said.

Processing the event also is closely tied to ones self-awareness of symptoms, said Virginia Locklear, executive director of the Rape Crisis Center of Robeson County.

Allowing oneself a variety of options for healing can be an effective key to unlocking a healthy path to moving forward! Locklear said.

Among those options are seeking professional counseling and learning how to avoid stressors, or triggers, if possible, she said.

Victims of sexual violence also may experience significant stress from the virus, she said. Victims of sexual violence or assault who have been affected by the virus can receive free counseling from the Rape Crisis Center by calling the 24-hour crisis line at 910-739-6278.

There have been 628,244 unemployment claims related to COVID-19 filed from March 15 to April 23, according to the N.C. Department of Commerce Employment Securitys website. In addition, $652,391,890 has been paid to 288,565 people since March 15.

Businesses across the county also have been affected, with many reporting a 15% to 40% reduction in productivity because to the new coronavirus, said Channing Jones, county economic development director. Some attribute the decrease to additional safety regulations put in place for workers, while others say it is caused by an increase in staff members not reporting to work.

However, a slow economic recovery is on the horizon, he said.

I would say by the end of 2020, we should see some strong economic indicators, Jones said. I think our economy is going to come back, and its going to come back strong.

Recovery will take time, as many states and regions reopen at different paces, said Barry OBrien, dean of UNCPs School of Business.

I think the recovery will be gradual at first, OBrien said. I think that the third and fourth quarter this year, you may see the economy grow at a much faster rate than people are anticipating.

While some may be criticized for reopening too quickly, its not a one-size fits all model, OBrien said.

The success of many businesses will hinge on how safe consumers feel shopping and engaging in activities that are no longer within social distancing restrictions, Jones said. Businesses with high patronage and cash flow before the virus also are likely to rebound better than others.

The small businesses who had healthy cash balances will stand the best chances of weathering the shutdown, he said.

Businesses whose capital was drained after Gov. Roy Coopers March 30 order to close nonessential businesses may not make it, he said.

Jones didnt criticize Coopers decision this past Thursday to extend the stay-at-home order to May 8, but said the economy needs people safely working again for a rebound to occur.

The longer were shut down, the harder its going to be for us to return, he said.

But, the shutdown has offered people the chance to save up, which will help the economy in the long run, OBrien said.

Because people are not spending money on gas or at nonessential businesses, many people will have a lot of spending power when the economy reopens, OBrien said.

I think people have absolutely cut back on their spending, he said. A lot of people are trying to budget their money very, very carefully.

And they will see it pay off later, he said.

OBrien also said the long-term effects of the virus are far-reaching.

This is going to change our economy and the way businesses and households operate forever, OBrien said.

Young couples might challenge gender roles and re-examine the importance of two working parents in a household, he said.

I think its going to cause people to re-examine some of their choices between work and leisure, he said.

The dean called adaptations made to the workplace in the virus wake a game changer for the future.

I think more and more people will spend most of their time working from home or remotely, OBrien said.

Jones

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_channing-jones-2.jpgJones

Allen

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_allenashley01-Copy-1.jpgAllen

Locklear

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_VirginiaLocklear-1.jpgLocklear

Barry OBrien, dean of the School of Business at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, attends a Monday afternoon WebEx online meeting from his home in Pawleys Island, South Carolina.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_BarryOBrien-1.jpgBarry OBrien, dean of the School of Business at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, attends a Monday afternoon WebEx online meeting from his home in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. Courtesy Photo | Pam OBrien

Professionals: COVID-19 may leave some people with mental health problems

April 27, 2020

April 27, 2020

RALEIGH The North Carolina Division of Aging and Adult Services is partnering with the NC Area Agencies on Aging and local service providers to distribute fans to eligible recipients through Operation Fan Heat Relief.

People ages 60 and older, and adults with disabilities, are eligible to sign up for assistance from May 1 through Oct. 31 at local aging agencies across the state. Since 1986, the relief program has bought fans for older adults and adults with disabilities, providing them with a more comfortable living environment and reducing heat-related illnesses.

As individuals age and develop chronic medical conditions, they are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. They may also be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. Operation Fan Heat Relief helps vulnerable adults at risk for heat-related illnesses stay safe during the summer.

In addition to applying for fans, eligible state residents can take the following steps during high temperatures: increase fluid intake, spend some time in cool or air-conditioned environments regularly, reduce strenuous activity during the afternoon, and speak with their physician before summer about how to stay safe while taking medication that can affect the bodys ability to cool itself, such as medication for high blood pressure.

The program is made possible by donations from Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Dominion Resources, which allow regional area agencies on aging and provider agencies to buy fans for eligible individuals. Provider agencies also can buy a limited number of air conditioners based on a persons specific health conditions.

This past year, the Division of Aging and Adult Services received $85,600 in donations, allowing for the distribution of 5,185 fans and 27 air conditioners.

For more information, individuals can contact their Area Agency on Aging or the NC Division of Aging and Adult Services Housing Program Consultant at 919-855-3419.

More information about Operation Fan Heat Relief, including tips on preparing for extreme heat and a list of local agencies distributing fans, is available at https://www.ncdhhs.gov/operation-fan-and-heat-relief.

Also, weekly heat-related illness emergency department visit data is available at https://publichealth.nc.gov/chronicdiseaseandinjury/heat.htm.

April 27, 2020

LUMBERTON Five people were arrested Friday through Sunday on charges that included resisting a public officer, trafficking cocaine and assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill, according to the Robeson County Sheriffs Office.

A 43-year-old man and 42-year-old woman, both of St. Pauls, were charged Sunday after the search of a residence at 414 Natureview Drive led to the seizure of a quantity of cocaine, marijuana, firearms, cash and drug paraphernalia, according to the Sheriffs Office.

Mickey McNeill, 43, and Earlena Locklear, 42, both of Natureview Drive, were charged with trafficking cocaine, conspiracy to sell or deliver cocaine, possession with intent to sell and deliver cocaine, possession with intent to sell and deliver marijuana, conspiracy to sell or deliver marijuana, maintaining a dwelling for a controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia, according to the Sheriffs Office.

Both were placed in the Robeson County Detention Center, each under a $51,000 secured bond.

The warrant was executed by the Sheriffs Offices Community Impact Team and SWAT operators.

A 26-year-old Fairmont man was arrested Friday on charges related to an April 18 assault on Pittman Loop Road in Fairmont that left a man hospitalized.

Bryan E. Moody is charged with second-degree kidnapping, assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill inflicting serious injury and robbery with a dangerous weapon, according to the Sheriffs Office. He also is charged with resisting arrest in an unrelated case.

Moody was placed in the Robeson County Detention Center under a $100,000 secured bond.

The victim of the assault reported he had a prearranged meeting with Moody on the day of the assault. He said that while he and his wife were inside of the house on Pittman Loop Road, he was held against his will at knifepoint, according to the Sheriffs Office.

He was able to escape, but was stabbed by his captor, according to the Sheriffs Office. The victim was taken to Duke Medical Center, and released at a later date.

One of two Shannon women arrested Friday in relation to a shoplifting incident at the Maxway store on East Fourth Avenue in Red Springs had warrants for her arrest in California.

Alexandria Tapia, 41, was charged with fleeing and eluding arrest with a motor vehicle, resisting a public officer and fugitive of justice.

Tapia is wanted in California for a charge of assault with a deadly weapon inflicting serious injury with intent to kill and will be extradited to California, according to the Sheriffs Office. She was placed in the Robeson County Detention Center under a $250,000 secured bond.

Mayra Olvera, 28, was charged with resisting a public officer. She was released on a written promise to appear in court.

A Sheriffs Office investigator saw a woman, believed to have just shoplifted at the Maxway store, running to her vehicle, according to the Sheriffs Office. Tapia and Olvera were caught after a vehicle pursuit that lasted less than five minutes and a brief foot pursuit.

Tapia

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_Alejandro-Tapia.jpgTapia

Olvera

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_M.-Olvera.jpgOlvera

Moody

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_Bryan-Moody.jpgMoody

Locklear

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_Earlena-L.-Locklear.jpgLocklear

McNeill

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_Mickey-McNeill.jpgMcNeill

April 27, 2020

ST. PAULS Two Parkton residents were arrested Friday on multiple drug and weapon charges during a traffic stop.

DaMous Bridges, 28, of Victoria Drive, and 22-year-old Eboney Hurley, of McMillian Siding Road, were arrested after the passenger vehicle in which they were traveling was stopped at East Armfield and Martin Luther King streets, according to St. Pauls police Detective Bradley Rountree.

Bridges is charged with possession of cocaine with intent to sell or deliver, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a concealed firearm and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, according to the St. Pauls Police Department.

He was placed in the Robeson County Detention Center under a $75,000 secured bond.

Hurley is charged with possession of marijuana, possession of cocaine with intent to sell or deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia, and possession of a concealed firearm, according to the police department.

She was released on a $50,500 unsecured bond.

The arrests were made by Officer Brynn Hinson, police Lt. Michael Seago and police Chief Steve Dollinger.

Bridges

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_DAMAUS-QONTA-BRIDGES.jpgBridges

Hurley

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_EBONEY-LAQUASHEA-HURLEY.jpgHurley

April 27, 2020

The following break-ins were reported Friday through Monday to the Robeson County Sheriffs Office:

Bullock Farms, Brayboy Road, Rowland; Phillip Hunt, Norment Road, Lumberton; Artis Locklear, Freewill Lane, Rowland; Miyoshi Anderson, South Chicken Road, Rowland; Makayla Chavis, South Chicken Road, Rowland; S. Locklear, Alford Farms Road, Maxton; Airica Mayes, Loretta Drive, Lumberton; and George Frazier, Bertha Jones Road, Rowland.

The following thefts were reported Friday through Sunday to the Robeson County Sheriffs Office:

Brittany Locklear, West Carthage Road, Lumberton; William Hough, Crestwood Drive, Lumberton; Heather Locklear, Ronco Drive, Shannon; and Evelyn Hardin, Alfordsville Road, Rowland.

Ricky McNeil reported Saturday to the Robeson County Sheriffs Office that he was the victim of an armed robbery that occurred at Norment Road and Van Born Drive in Lumberton.

Brandon McLean reported Friday to the Robeson County Sheriffs Office that he was seriously injured during an assault that occurred on Milk Dairy Road in Red Springs.

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Professionals say the effects of COVID-19 may be long-lasting for some - The Robesonian

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April 28th, 2020 at 2:47 am

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