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Archive for the ‘Organic Food’ Category

Digging up the dirt: could soil contain the answer to food shortages? – Reuters

Posted: January 4, 2020 at 12:54 am


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ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - As water shortages, high temperatures and rising greenhouse gas emissions threaten food production, countries around the world are looking somewhere new for solutions - the soil.

For decades, farmers wanting to boost their yields have focused their attention on fertilisers, technology and new seed varieties.

Instead, they should be looking under their feet, according to experts, who warn that years of erosion and degradation of the soil through intensive farming have created the conditions for a global food production crisis.

Data suggests that if we do not restore global soil health, it is highly likely the consequences within 10 years will be many, many millions facing food and water insecurity, British soil expert John Crawford told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

This could lead to civil unrest, mass migration, radicalization and violence on an unprecedented scale, said Crawford, until recently a science director at the worlds oldest agricultural research institute, Rothamsted Research.

Much of the problem is caused by erosion, which strips away the highly fertile top layer of soil. An area of soil the size of a soccer pitch is eroded every five seconds, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

While soil erosion occurs naturally, human activities such as intensive agriculture, deforestation and urban sprawl have significantly increased the rate at which it is happening.

Nearly a third of Earths soil is already degraded. At current rates, that will increase to 90% by 2050, the FAO forecasts, warning that pollution from human activity such as mining and manufacturing as well as erosion are to blame.

There are signs the world is beginning to wake up to the issue, which Crawford said it had only about 10 to 15 years to sort out.

Soil is one of the most important regulators of global climate because it stores more carbon than the planets atmosphere and vegetation combined, he said.

If you fix soil, you mitigate a whole bunch of other risks, added Crawford, now professor of technology and strategy at the Adam Smith Business School in Glasgow.

Whole Foods, the upscale U.S. retailer that made its name selling organic food, has put regenerative agriculture - farming that focuses on soil health - at the top of its trends for 2020.

LOW-COST TESTING

From Iowa to the Ayeyarwady delta region of Myanmar - known as the countrys rice bowl - farmers are trying to figure out how to make their soil healthier and more productive.

In a remote village in the Ayeyarwady delta recently, a group of farmers sat cross-legged on a wooden floor and discussed why their once-thriving farms had become less productive.

The men had started testing their soil for the first time with the help of Proximity Designs, a business that designs low-cost farming products.

The company only began offering low-cost soil testing services in Myanmar in 2018 and by last October it had already sold more than 7,600 tests at $17 each, highlighting farmer interest.

We didnt have anyone to teach us (about soil). We followed suggestions from others, thinking they might work, said Win Zaw, 44, who grows rice twice a year on his six-acre (2.4-hectare) farm.

We knew something was wrong, but didnt know what to do, he said, looking down at neatly-typed sheets of paper detailing the levels of nitrogen, phosphate, potassium, acidity and organic matter in the soil.

All the farms were showing very low organic matter, which is produced by decomposing plants and is key to good soil health.

Proximity Designs agronomists said this was likely due partly to the warm climate, which degrades organic matter more quickly, and partly to local farming practices.

Their recommendations were relatively simple: leave crop residues after the harvest to retain the moisture in the soil, or sow cover crops - those planted to protect the soil between rice plantings rather than for commercial reasons.

When it came to fertilizer use, the recommended amount was much lower than what the farmers were using.

Applying farming practices without knowing whats happening in the soil can lead to crop failures, soil degradation, environmental damage and ecosystem breakdown, said Proximity founder Debbie Aung Din.

In Iowa, a state in the U.S. Midwest known for its cornfields, farmers are increasingly seeking to improve soil health, said Richard Cruse, a professor at Iowa State Universitys agronomy department.

We see increasing numbers of cover crops that are being planted. Were increasing the rate of no-till adoption, he said, referring to a method of farming without tilling the soil that is said to reduce erosion.

Ive talked to several (farmers) in my area who are saying, We have to do something different.

But many lack the expertise and skills, while farmers who rent say it is not worth investing in land that they do not own.

In Iowa, more than half of the farmland is managed by farmers that dont own the land, said Cruse.

Ive had multiple farmers tell me, conservation practices on land that I rent is a cost.

Ronald Vargas, land and water officer for the FAO and secretary of the Global Soils Partnership - a key player in pushing this issue - said farmers had to be given advice and incentives.

Soil can be your ally or your enemy, he said. But in many countries, farmers are left alone. There is nobody advising them.

Reporting By Thin Lei Win @thinink, Editing by Claire Cozens. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, climate change, women's and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, and property rights. Visit http://www.trust.org

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Digging up the dirt: could soil contain the answer to food shortages? - Reuters

Written by admin

January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

Fifty years of cultivating community at the Food Conspiracy Co-op – Inside Tucson Business

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Back in 1971, the Food Conspiracy Co-op was formed by Tucson residents who sought to create a new approach to providing food to the community. These organizers used their collective purchasing power to obtain natural food products, which werent as readily available in stores back then.

The Food Conspiracy Co-op is now the citys sole full-service food cooperative. Being member-owned holds them accountable to their customers, so the focus can remain on the quality of the products. I spoke with board president Michael DeSantis and board vice president Kevin Hendricks about this iconic place for both a healthy food and healthy community as the organization approaches its 50th anniversary next year.

Hendricks called the co-op not only a place for food, but also a space for shared values, as food primarily brings people together.

The co-op has been celebrating diversity and inclusivity for 50 years.

DeSantis said the co-ops mission is solid, the organization has never been stronger, and there is a shared vision that will prepare us for long-term success.

DeSantis believes the organization has successfully created a healthy, transparent operation, where staff and board members can openly communicate. He now wants to explore exceeding typical practices and industry norms. One example: Their declaration of The Conspiracy Way, a community code of conduct that promotes healthy, positive behaviors and communication for a variety of scenarios. In addition to this declaration, the organization has focused on creating unity between the staff and the board, authoring a collaborative strategic plan (with their customer-owners in mind) and passing a resolution to provide ownership to all staff to share in the opportunities, resulting in high levels of staff engagement and retention.

With a strong team in place, expansion and innovation are possible. The Food Conspiracy Co-op has plans to expand their retail offerings and prepared foods, create a comfortable seating area, and provide increased parking and a new east entrance and parking area. Hendricks sees the new entrance as the tactic for bringing it all together. The second element of the project will include design ideas from owners, board members, and staff to integrate the gardens and existing parking lot to develop a campus/village feel from Third Avenue to Fourth Avenue, so that all holdings of the co-op are tied together by the community space of the gardens.

Both DeSantis and Hendricks are passionate about fostering communal space. DeSantis is proud of the co-ops strong partnership with suppliers, as well as their long-term farm loan program. He also believes in supporting outside educational organizations and other community organizations. There are strong relationships with service providers that range from students and farmers to designers and architects, as well as strong connections with the larger world of co-operatives.

Hendricks said the grocery and kitchen department managers are always looking to connect with local producers and they actively make visits to see the operations and go through the quality process to see if they can get the product on the shelves or be included in the prepared foods and highlighted in the newsletter articles and promotional avenues.

In essence, if it is on the shelves of the co-op, then it should be considered an endorsement because of the high quality of the food and being a local product.

DeSantis found on his first visit to Tucson that the co-op was the epitome of community. After volunteering and attending the board meetings, he formally joined the board of directors to contribute ideas. He had joined the Food Conspiracy first in the early 70s before moving to Northern Arizona and, later, California to work in project management for both renewable energy and community development. When he returned, he realized that all of the skills he learned while away would be of value to the challenges and opportunities being faced by the co-op. Today, he is proud of his fellow board members who each bring experience and perspective that contribute to the long-term viability of the organization.

After moving from Washington, D.C., to Tucson in 2008, Hendricks looked for the best place to find local organic food. His quest for organic, non-GMO foods led him to the co-op. He joined the board because hes is always seeking ways to educate the public about co-ops quality of locally sourced food.

DeSantis and Hendricks share a similar experience in the Food Conspiracy Co-op: It was one of the first community connections they made while first living in Tucson. This speaks to not only the well-known benefits of quality organic offerings, but also to how this Tucson institution is a magnet for inspiring collective community efforts.

Michael Peel is the Southern Arizona director of Local First Arizona. This is a regular series of columns from Local First Arizona on local sustainable economy issues. Get involved as a member or volunteer of Local First Arizona by signing up at localfirstaz.com.

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Fifty years of cultivating community at the Food Conspiracy Co-op - Inside Tucson Business

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January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

Farmer’s Daughter: The 2020s promise a new shift in ag technology and perspective – AGDAILY

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Its 2020. Weve entered a new decade. Its an exciting time and a fresh start. Remember the dawn of 2010? If you think not much has changed, I challenge you to think about the cell phone you owned on Jan. 1 that year. Yeah, the world has definitely progressed!

Personally, the last decade saw tremendous changes in my life. As the calendar turned to 2010, I was still in law school. I wasnt writing about agriculture. And the idea hadnt even crossed my mind yet.

Agriculture has gone through quite a bit since then as well. Weve seen a big economic downturn. Weve added new technologies in a meaningful way. And cutting-edge advancements from 2010 are now commonplace. Consumer preferences have also shifted drastically. We saw the rise of the non-GMO label and plant-based meats and milks.

So what does this new decade have in store for agriculture? Ive gazed into my crystal ball and read the tea leaves. And Im ready to give you my predictions for the 2020s.

1. The farm economy will turn around in a big way.

I promise this isnt just wishful thinking. Weve had bad economic conditions in agriculture for quite a few years now. The industry is changing in some good ways and a few bad ways. But eventually it will turn around, and well see positive economic conditions. The economy is cyclical, so the chances are pretty high. But the big question is whether weve hit the bottom of this downturn. And Im not sure thats the case. It might get worse before it gets better.

2. The non-GMO labels best days are over.

Too many food companies have plastered their products with those little monarch-butterfly logos in the 2010s. And companies unwilling to pay the big fees to The Non-GMO Project have come up with their own versions. But I think weve seen the heyday of these ridiculous labels. Why? Because the USDAs GMO labels will soon be commonplace. And while I was initially opposed to them, I think it will eventually become no big deal. The USDA designed beautiful labels that positively reflect biotechnology. So the negative associations will be less effective over time, even if it doesnt go away completely.

3. Organic sales will plateau.

Im cheating a bit on this one: The growth rate of organic food sales slowed in 2018. So I suspect the trend will continue. Its true the certification had a great decade. But sales are no longer expanding exponentially. And I sense that consumers are starting to catch on that organic marketing overblows its benefits. Why spend more money for something that doesnt really give you any benefits? Organic will always be an option; I just dont see it expanding at the same rate. Plus popular discord has moved away from organic and onto other trendy words, like regenerative agriculture. In the 2020s well move beyond organic to the next big thing (hopefully thatll be science!).

4. Were going to see big changes in technology.

Weve all seen the videos of little robots that can run around a field and pull weeds without human assistance. They arent necessarily ready for prime time yet, but theres progress. And last year at the Fort Wayne Farm Show, there were plenty of agriculture start-up companies with new products and technologies. So it feels like were at a point where were going to see some big things coming to the farm. Im willing to bet that by 2030, agriculture technology is going to look much different than it does today.

5. Biotechnology will offer solutions to persistent problems.

Orange groves decimated by citrus greening. Coffee threatened by climate change. Bananas hit with Fusarium wilt. The 2010s saw a lot of these serious challenges to popular crops. But we didnt make much progress in stopping it. The 2020s will be different. And biotechnology will make the difference. Well see crops that are resistant to major diseases and hardy enough to combat the effects of climate change. Biotechnology will be heralded as a hero, not a villain.

So those are my big predictions. What do you think? And what do you see happening over the next 10 years?

Amanda Zaluckyj blogs under the nameThe Farmers Daughter USA. Her goal is to promote farmers and tackle the misinformation swirling around the U.S. food industry.

Originally posted here:

Farmer's Daughter: The 2020s promise a new shift in ag technology and perspective - AGDAILY

Written by admin

January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

FEATURE-Digging up the dirt – could soil contain the answer to food shortages? – Reuters Africa

Posted: at 12:54 am


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ROME, Jan 3 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - As water shortages, high temperatures and rising greenhouse gas emissions threaten food production, countries around the world are looking somewhere new for solutions - the soil.

For decades, farmers wanting to boost their yields have focused their attention on fertilisers, technology and new seed varieties.

Instead, they should be looking under their feet, according to experts, who warn that years of erosion and degradation of the soil through intensive farming have created the conditions for a global food production crisis.

Data suggests that if we do not restore global soil health, it is highly likely the consequences within 10 years will be many, many millions facing food and water insecurity, British soil expert John Crawford told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

This could lead to civil unrest, mass migration, radicalisation and violence on an unprecedented scale, said Crawford, until recently a science director at the worlds oldest agricultural research institute, Rothamsted Research.

Much of the problem is caused by erosion, which strips away the highly fertile top layer of soil. An area of soil the size of a soccer pitch is eroded every five seconds, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

While soil erosion occurs naturally, human activities such as intensive agriculture, deforestation and urban sprawl have significantly increased the rate at which it is happening.

Nearly a third of Earths soil is already degraded. At current rates, that will increase to 90% by 2050, the FAO forecasts, warning that pollution from human activity such as mining and manufacturing as well as erosion are to blame.

There are signs the world is beginning to wake up to the issue, which Crawford said it had only about 10 to 15 years to sort out.

Soil is one of the most important regulators of global climate because it stores more carbon than the planets atmosphere and vegetation combined, he said.

If you fix soil, you mitigate a whole bunch of other risks, added Crawford, now professor of technology and strategy at the Adam Smith Business School in Glasgow.

Whole Foods, the upscale U.S. retailer that made its name selling organic food, has put regenerative agriculture - farming that focuses on soil health - at the top of its trends for 2020.

LOW-COST TESTING

From Iowa to the Ayeyarwady delta region of Myanmar - known as the countrys rice bowl - farmers are trying to figure out how to make their soil healthier and more productive.

In a remote village in the Ayeyarwady delta recently, a group of farmers sat cross-legged on a wooden floor and discussed why their once-thriving farms had become less productive.

The men had started testing their soil for the first time with the help of Proximity Designs, a business that designs low-cost farming products.

The company only began offering low-cost soil testing services in Myanmar in 2018 and by last October it had already sold more than 7,600 tests at $17 each, highlighting farmer interest.

We didnt have anyone to teach us (about soil). We followed suggestions from others, thinking they might work, said Win Zaw, 44, who grows rice twice a year on his six-acre (2.4-hectare) farm.

We knew something was wrong, but didnt know what to do, he said, looking down at neatly-typed sheets of paper detailing the levels of nitrogen, phosphate, potassium, acidity and organic matter in the soil.

All the farms were showing very low organic matter, which is produced by decomposing plants and is key to good soil health.

Proximity Designs agronomists said this was likely due partly to the warm climate, which degrades organic matter more quickly, and partly to local farming practices.

Their recommendations were relatively simple: leave crop residues after the harvest to retain the moisture in the soil, or sow cover crops - those planted to protect the soil between rice plantings rather than for commercial reasons.

When it came to fertiliser use, the recommended amount was much lower than what the farmers were using.

Applying farming practices without knowing whats happening in the soil can lead to crop failures, soil degradation, environmental damage and ecosystem breakdown, said Proximity founder Debbie Aung Din.

In Iowa, a state in the U.S. Midwest known for its cornfields, farmers are increasingly seeking to improve soil health, said Richard Cruse, a professor at Iowa State Universitys agronomy department.

We see increasing numbers of cover crops that are being planted. Were increasing the rate of no-till adoption, he said, referring to a method of farming without tilling the soil that is said to reduce erosion.

Ive talked to several (farmers) in my area who are saying, We have to do something different.

But many lack the expertise and skills, while farmers who rent say it is not worth investing in land that they do not own.

In Iowa, more than half of the farmland is managed by farmers that dont own the land, said Cruse.

Ive had multiple farmers tell me, conservation practices on land that I rent is a cost.

Ronald Vargas, land and water officer for the FAO and secretary of the Global Soils Partnership - a key player in pushing this issue - said farmers had to be given advice and incentives.

Soil can be your ally or your enemy, he said. But in many countries, farmers are left alone. There is nobody advising them. (Reporting By Thin Lei Win @thinink, Editing by Claire Cozens. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, climate change, womens and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, and property rights. Visit http://www.trust.org)

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FEATURE-Digging up the dirt - could soil contain the answer to food shortages? - Reuters Africa

Written by admin

January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

With hemp, Gritty and craft beer, Pa. Farm Show is hipper than ever – pennlive.com

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For some, the Pennsylvania Farm Show seems folksy, if not quaint.

From the Main Hall with its iconic butter sculpture to animal pens, chirping chicks and a bustling food court, a thread of Americana is evident inside the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center in Harrisburg.

For eight days every January, visitors find Amish furniture for sale, a blue-ribbon apple pie contest, tractor square dancing, cooking demonstrations and horse pulls, among hundreds of exhibits. They sip Pennsylvania Dairymens milkshakes and stuff themselves with chicken corn soup, mushroom burgers and apple dumplings.

The Farm Show, after all, is a showcase of the states agricultural industry. It is the Keystone States version of a state fair.

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Lately the show has taken on a bit of a hipper vibe. You can actually - gasp! - buy wine and hard cider, sample beer, order gluten-free foods, buy hemp products and grab a glimpse of Gritty, the famed Flyers mascot, in all of his buttery glory.

Like everything, you have to constantly change. You cant standstill. You either go forward or backwards. So, were going forward, said Ron Frederick, who assists with the FFA horticulture and window exhibits.

Here are five hip things youll find at the 2020 Farm Show:

The butter sculpture is revealed at the Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg, January 2, 2020 and features Gritty, the mascot for the Philadelphia Flyers. Dan Gleiter | dgleiter@pennlive.com

Gritty in butter

Its not just that we predicted it when we came up with our list of butter sculptures we wanted to see. Its that we predicted a need for it. When Gritty, the mascot for the Philadelphia Flyers, first appeared, he was not warmly received by all. But it was only a matter of weeks before he was everywhere, and the Philly fans fully embraced their furry new friend. The memes were flying back and forth all through 2019 as the googly-eyed monster found a place in our hearts. And now hes got a place at our Farm Show, immortalized in that same buttery hall of fame - the annual butter sculpture - as figures like Benjamin Franklin and Milton Hershey.

Chiques Creek hemp tea is new in 2020. New items, and some returning favorites, are shown at the 2020 Pennsylvania Farm Show food court preview, January 2, 2020. Dan Gleiter | dgleiter@pennlive.com

Hemp and more hemp

Suddenly, hemp is big business in Pennsylvania, thanks to a change in federal law that makes it easier to grow the crop commercially. (Hemp comes from the cannabis plant, but the psychoactive chemical THC which allows marijuana users to feel a high, is removed.)

Naturally, hemp is popping up in several forms at the show, including a range of products for sale such as hemp kitty litter. A hemp exhibit will give visitors a peek inside a small hemp house and hempmobile," both with parts made from hemp products.

In the food court the hemp theme continues at the PennAg Industries booth where they sell Chiques Creek Hemp Tea from Kreider Farms in Lancaster County. The 12-ounce bottles run $2 in three flavors - original, passionfruit-mint and peach-lemon-dandelion - and are made from hemp seed oil.

We are promoting Pennsylvania agriculture and hemp is an important agricultural product of the state of Pennsylvania, said Dave Andrews, Kreiders vice president of sales and marketing. We are trying to be leaders in hemp agriculture because its the beginning of a renaissance and we want to be on the leading edge of that.

Lt. Gov. John Fetterman talks to FFA members before the butter sculpture is revealed at the Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg, January 2, 2020. Dan Gleiter | dgleiter@pennlive.com

An unconventional lieutenant governor

Say what you will about our Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman or his politics, but hes a striking figure compared to his fellow Pennsylvania politicians. Even if he werent a tall, potentially imposing figure, youre not likely to see him in a suit and tie very often. And he certainly wasnt wearing one during the preview for this years Farm Show, as he posed with the butter sculpture - and mugged with Gritty for social media - and sampled new food court offerings. If the Farm Show is Graceland, the Dairymens milkshake is Elvis, he quipped, while sipping a Farm Show milkshake. He and his wife, Gisele, became political celebrities even before joining the Wolf administration - and did we mention that they hang out with Kim Kardashian sometimes?

PENNLIVE.COM

Farm Show attendees visit the Pennsylvania Cider Guild area in the Main Hall to sip and sample hard cider, January 5, 2019. File photo by Dan Gleiter | dgleiter@pennlive.com

Lots of booze

Who would have thought you could drink alcohol at the Farm Show, let alone buy it? Weve come a long way in PA. In recent years, the Farm Show has tapped into the states booming booze businesses. For several years Pennsylvania wineries have had prime real estate at the show with a booth in the Main Hall where wineries pour samples and sell bottles of their best. Several years ago, hard cider followed and last year beer had its day with an inaugural craft beer competition. This year, for the first time, visitors ages 21 and older will be able to buy hard cider as well as sample craft beer. Of course, results from wine, hard cider and craft beer competitions will be announced on Jan. 4.

The Philly port sandwich, made with chopped portabella mushrooms seasoned with garlic, onions, salt, pepper and cheese, served Philadelphia cheesesteak style. is new for 2020. New items, and some returning favorites, are shown at the 2020 Pennsylvania Farm Show food court preview, January 2, 2020. Dan Gleiter | dgleiter@pennlive.com

Gluten-free, vegan and organic foods

In the past, if you followed a strict diet, you were likely out of luck at the Farm Show. Most of the food court offerings hardly pass as health food. But vendors introducing more options, making it easier for those who cant or dont want to eat deep-fried everything. (Look, if Burger King can sell Beyond Burgers, the Farm Show can certainly do its part.) This year, the Mushroom Growers of Pennsylvania are selling a Philly Port Sandwich that can be ordered sans roll as a vegan and gluten-free option. In addition, the Pennsylvania Livestock Association added gluten-free meatballs. (Although, it notes all of its meats are gluten-free.) And Bell & Evans has brought on board a full menu of organic chicken items, including a new entrant for 2020, parmesan crusted chicken meatballs.

Thanks for visiting PennLive. Quality local journalism has never been more important. We need your support. Not a subscriber yet? Please consider supporting our work.

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With hemp, Gritty and craft beer, Pa. Farm Show is hipper than ever - pennlive.com

Written by admin

January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

Global Organic Food and Beverages Market Estimated to Account for US$ 323.56 Billion by 2024 – Industry Chronicle 24

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Zion Market Research recently added a new report on Global Organic Food and Beverages Market Set for Rapid Growth, to Reach Around USD 323.56 Billion by 2024 in their database which includes the in-depth analysis and global forecast for the market. TheOrganic Food and Beverages Marketreport also covers the major growth factors, key trends, opportunities and major company profiles.

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Global Organic Food and Beverages Market Estimated to Account for US$ 323.56 Billion by 2024 - Industry Chronicle 24

Written by admin

January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

Top 10 Food Industry Executive Articles of 2019 – Food Industry Executive

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This years been an exciting one for the food industry new trends emerged, cutting-edge technology gained traction, and customer preferences shifted. So as 2019 draws to a close, were excited to share our top headlines from this year.

Heres a roundup of this years top food industry stories.

Its no secret that the organic food space is booming. But in 2018, the sector saw exceptional growth. In this article, check out which organic products took off and which ones struggled to make a splash.

Read full article

Based on the results of this survey, healthy eating has hit the mainstream. Read more about what qualities consumers look for in food, and their attitudes towards healthy, sustainable food and beverages, in this article.

Read full article

Whats next for the food industry? According to Innova, well be hearing a lot about plant-based diets, macronutrients, texture, and more.

Read full article

In another look at 2020 food trends, Whole Foods predicts that next year, things like sugar substitutes, grab-and-go meals and snacks, and plant-based proteins will dominate grocery store shelves.

Read full article

OSHA issued $7,171,513 in fines to the food manufacturing industry between October 2018 and September 2019. Here, we reveal the most frequently cited standards in the food manufacturing industry.

Read full article

This installment of our Did You Know? series takes a deep dive into what it takes to get a new food or beverage product to market successfully.

Read full article

For years, pet owners thought that if their furry friends were eating grain-free pet food, they were eating healthy pet food. But when the FDA released data from its canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) investigation earlier this year, consumers started losing faith in grain-free formulas.

Read the full article

Every year, Inc. magazine publishes a list of the 5,000 fastest-growing privately held companies in the U.S. And this year, 128 food and beverage companies made the list. To see where these up-and-coming companies fall on the list, check out this article.

Read the full article

The food retail space is continually evolving to keep up with consumer trends. So whats working for food retailers, and what are their challenges? This piece goes into the findings of a Food Marketing Institute (FMI) report to reveal the good, the bad, the blurry, and the new issues affecting food retailers.

Read the full article

If theres one trend thats gained some serious traction over the past year, its plant-based meat. But Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat arent the only players in the game. This article provides a roundup of some of the companies offering or planning to launch plant-based meat.

Read the full article

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Top 10 Food Industry Executive Articles of 2019 - Food Industry Executive

Written by admin

January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

How to Audit Your Grocery Bill in 7 Minutes (and Save Tons) – Yahoo Finance

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Its an area of your budget thats easy to overlook: the creeping costs of your monthly grocery bill. Maybeyoure accidentally buying duplicate cans of beans. Or consistently tossing (i.e.,wasting) the same bag ofwiltedlettuce from your fridge before finishing it. By taking just seven minutes to assess what youre really spending on food each week, youll not only gain a better understanding of your households groceryneeds but also determine where you cancut costs. (Hello, forever goal.)

Great, so how do I audit my grocery bill?Tostart, gatheryour grocery receipts from the past month. Next, tally the members of your household and jot down any special dietary needs (say, a food allergy or sensitivity) that need to be accounted for. An example:In your family of four, one person is avegetarian. Or one is gluten-free. This information will provide context for the next step,because you cant properly assess your food budget without first quantifying the number of mouths youre feeding and understanding the origins for any spending spikes.

Next, categorize your food spending. Is the bulk of your cash going to organic produce? Or are you dropping major bucks on fancy jars of tomato sauce for your penne-loving child? (Yes, were looking at you, Raos.) Separate the items on your list by food groupmeats, produce, snacks, etc.then total the costs. Note: This isnt a guilt tripits more about grasping where your money is going every time you visit the store.

The final step.Open your fridge. Check out your pantry. Whats in there thatsconsistently gobbledup? And whats continually going to waste?Maybe you have four cansof chickpeas that you forgot about but could easily sprinkleintoyour lunch salads over the next three weeks.Or perhaps you shelled out $7 for a stir-fry sauce that you never used and theexpiration date is drawing near. Whatever the items, take stock and add them to your list.

Now, the million-dollar question.Based on everything you wrote down, where can you save? In other words, could you pivot to buying store-brand pasta sauce? (Will your7-year-old notice a difference? Probably not.) Or, if youre going tospend more on organic meat, whats another areawhereyou can easily cut back? (Maybe you can mix in more vegetarian optionsa fewtimes a week to trim costs.)

The point of this exercise is to not only gut check your food spending but also your habits. NewYear, new you, right? An audit is not just good for your waistline, its also great for your wallet.

RELATED: The 10 Items That People Always Overspend on at the Grocery Store

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How to Audit Your Grocery Bill in 7 Minutes (and Save Tons) - Yahoo Finance

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January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

Organic Food & Organic Beverages Market Competitive Environment and Forecast 2017 2025 – Filmi Baba

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Global Organic Food and Beverages Market: Overview

Organic foods are grown without the use of synthetic additives, chemicals, genetic manipulation, and coloring agents, and need to satisfy the criteria set by the USDA National Organic Program. Organic foods and beverages are in high demand as they are healthy alternative to their traditional counterparts. As the world becomes more aware about the goodness of everything natural and products free from chemicals, the demand for organic food and beverages is growing at a fast pace. Some of the other factors boosting the market include growing health hazards due to inorganic food products, high income level, and improvement in organic farming practices.

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Global Organic Food and Beverages Market: Key Trends

Incidences such as the mad cow scandal in the U.S., Canada, and other countries have resulted in the questioning of using genetically modified foods. Such incidences also bring to light, the abuse of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and insecticides in traditional farming practices. The result is a society that is more aware and concerned about such unhealthy food products and therefore seeking organic food and beverages. Although, expensive than non-organic products, organic food and beverages are increasingly being purchased and it has become a lifestyle for many upper middle class people in the world.

Retailers of organic food and beverages are recognizing the need to educate young families so as to ensure a long-term loyalty and this is expected to boost the global organic food and beverages market in the long run. Hotels and restaurants are also capitalizing on this trend and serving organic food and beverages to customers, further boosting the market. Manufacturers are attempting to develop products in an organic way and obtaining organic certification, thus attracting customers and furthering the growth of the industry.

Organic Food and Beverages Market: Market Potential

The success in the retail organic sector that offer organic food and beverages is creating huge opportunities for manufacturers to increase their sales. Many food and beverage companies are associating with organic food and beverage companies so as to enhance their brand equity and be linked to healthy platforms. Big names such as General Mills for instance, have purchased Small Planet Foods, which is a U.S. based company that grows, markets, and distributes organic food products. Coca-Cola acquired Odwalla, which is another American company that sells organic fruit juices, smoothies, and bars.

Organic Food and Beverages Market: Regional Outlook

The key markets for organic foods and beverages have been Europe and North America traditionally, but today, countries across the globe are proving to be lucrative markets for these products. There is high demand for organic food and beverages in countries such as India, Argentina, China, Brazil, and Mexico, and thus, manufacturers are forced to expand their manufacturing base to these countries. This in turn is ensuring a steady development of the market. Of regions such as North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Rest of the World, Asia Pacific is anticipated to hold promising growth opportunities in the organic food and beverages market. The regions expected success in the market can be attributed to growing awareness and affinity for organic ingredients. The market in the Rest of the World is also expected to flourish in the coming years.

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Organic Food and Beverages Market: Competitive Landscape

The global food and beverages market is fragmented with players such as Kraft Foods Group Inc., Groupe Danone SA, Starbucks, Whole Foods Market, Dean Foods Co., 365 Everyday Value/Whole Foods, Eden Foods, The Hain Celestial Group, Inc., Kellogg Company, Organic Valley, and Amys Kitchen Inc.

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Organic Food & Organic Beverages Market Competitive Environment and Forecast 2017 2025 - Filmi Baba

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January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

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From CBD-infused Weetos to pegan diets, this year’s top 10 food trends have something to say about SLO County – New Times SLO

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This past year was all about alternative milks and nut butters.

Cannabis and/or CBD-infused food and beverages.

Flower flavors and bitter plant fronds in your cocktails.

Salads, collagen-pumped foods, prebiotics, avocado toast, aai bowls, and antioxidants.

Real butter is back and we all seem to be comfortable cooking with ghee and coconut oil. That's 2019.

I scoured Bon Appetit, Forbes, VinePair, Pinterest, and Global Food Forums for their biggest predictions and trend watches for 2019 and thought about how SLO County had kept up with the rest of the country. It's interesting what our food industry caught on to, such as local sourcing, zero-waste cooking, fresh produce, healthy kids meals, and global flavors. What I love about SLO County is that no matter how healthy we are, we still have long lines for donuts topped with pink and white animal cookies.

Forbes predicted 2019 would be a year of eating at home. The evidence was all over Pinterest: Low-prep, foil pack dinner recipes became the thing for busy cooks. Looking at the latest SLO County data, this makes sense economically. The statistics show our estimated median household income in 2017 is about $72,000. The majority of the population are three to seven person households, and data aside, we know the cost of living in California doesn't leave that much left for eating out and working doesn't leave much time for cooking time-intensive meals. Crock pots, one-pan bakes, and foil packs it is.

According to the market research company Mintel, "anti-aging" was out this year and "healthy aging" was in. In stores, co-ops, and markets, and on menus countywide, we saw more products that support health from the inside out, targeting the brain, bone, joint, muscle, heart, and eye health, as well as reduced inflammation. Interest grew in "nootropics," such as chocolate and coffee, now infused with turmeric and medicinal mushrooms to improve cognitive function.

Alternatives to milk, flour, and anything else people have decided is "bad for you" abound, including oat milka new non-dairy favoriteand tapioca and cassava flour. Maybe you can thank the pegans out there for all of these fabulous alternatives. The new hot diet is both paleo and vegan. Pegan! Get it?

In SLO County, these healthy trends became evident at the co-ops and small market grab 'n' go sections. Locally-grown, organic produce from farmers you know was on every menu, and entirely organic storefronts popped up, like Sheila Kearns Chocolate & Confections, Pagnol at 3rd Street Bakery, and Etto Pastificio.

2019 was the year of the noshing table. Charcuterie board classes were wildly popular, and wine tasting and food events around town all began serving entire spreads of artistically curated "grazing" tables with imported and local cheeses, cured meats, olives, baguettes, and crackers. It's always been a thing in highfalutin circles, but these bites became a mainstream phenomenon. A highlight from the New Times' holiday party was a delicious large spread from Cured and Cultivated in Paso.

Fats made a comeback this year. The keto, paleo, grain-free, and pegan diets infiltrated conversations so much, some of us couldn't help but roll our eyes. We saw these new integrations of fat sources in every local store and in the employee fridge, including keto-friendly nutrition bars crafted with MCT oil powder; coconut butter-filled chocolates; fat bombs; and a new wave of ready-to-drink vegan coffees inspired by butter coffees.

What happens when you legalize it? Hemp hearts, seeds, and oils are from Cleopatra's time, but this year the cannabis craze evolved into everything from waffle mix to dried pasta. A new interest in the potential benefits stemming from other parts of hemp plants had many new storefronts looking to explore the fruitful cannabis biz, while local laws permitted empty buildings in some towns to sell the stuff.

Plant-based foods took on the meat-based snacking world of jerkies and pork rinds. Mushrooms played a key role in jerky snacks. You may have seen vegan jerky at House of Jerky and Whole Foods. I have no authority to write about this because I have yet to try it. Yuck (I think?). Though with all our vegan love, we also live in a place where Wagyu beef and Templeton Hills grass-fed, grass-finished cuts are on restaurant menus, and most days, I see bumper stickers reminding me to eat more meat, so I'll take that advice.

This was the year of Tesla popsicles. Even the classic Otter Pop was replaced with a healthy alternative. Innovative bases, such as avocado, hummus, tahini, and coconut water transformed regular ol' vanilla ice cream. Specialty frozen aisles now offer plant-based frozen desserts and ice creams with savory swirls of artisanal cheese, and here in SLO County, lactose-friendly Negranti sheep's milk ice cream has longer lines at wine festivals than the wineries.

They call it "zero-waste" cocktails. But let's call it what it is: an extra step. If you haven't weened your children off straws, this has also been the year of ordering your kid an apple juice and having to remember to ask for a straw when your server comes back.

VinePair lists sour beers as a top drink trend this year. Do our local craft breweries have it? Yep. Our brewers were on it before 2019. And they're also part of the hybrind frenzy: from beer/wine hybrids such as Firestone Walker's Rosalie to bourbon-barrel-aged wine like James Foster makes at Stave & Steel, Paso. Let's not forget spiked seltzer waters and hard kombucha. And just as stylish this year in SLO County are low and no-proof "mocktails," perfected by Paso's Yes Cocktail Company.

Winemaker Doug Minnick, who co-founded the Garagiste Festival in Paso, said this year in wine was all about the hard-to-grow, rebel varietals such as the arneis.

Many of you have noticed an ocean-themed stand at the Templeton farmers' market. Sea greens came in with the dinner tide this year, from seaweed butter to kelp noodles. Consumers are exploring varietals of algae and kelp with superfood properties. Puffed snacks made from water lily seeds, plant-based tuna alternatives with algae ingredients, crispy snackable salmon skins with omega-3s and kelp jerkies are other ocean-based foods. Oak Creek Commons in Paso even hosted a kelp cooking class this year, which included lots of Pacific Coast seaweed from a local company called Kelpful.

Portable snack packages feature more ambitious bites, such as prosciutto and aged mozzarella and artisanal versions of classic snacks. New packaged snacks take us back to our treat-loving childhoods but with higher quality ingredients and alternative flours and oils. And keeping with the new diet fads, we now have cassava chips, macadamia nut butter, freeze-dried dark chocolate covered strawberries, and aai bowls. Even the cafeteria food at our elementary schools have caught on. Thanks to San Luis Coastal Unified School District, students are snacking on homemade chocolate hummus and organic Kandarian grain salads. They can even meet their farmer in the food lines.

Flavor Writer Beth Giuffre is a snacker. Send tasty noshables to bgiuffre@newtimesslo.com.

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From CBD-infused Weetos to pegan diets, this year's top 10 food trends have something to say about SLO County - New Times SLO

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January 4th, 2020 at 12:54 am

Posted in Organic Food


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