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The art of walking | Opinion – Murray Ledger and Times

Posted: April 3, 2020 at 2:50 am


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Lets take a timeout from politics.

The American Heart Associations National Walking Day is April 3. Walking will put your brain in a meditative state, reduces stress, boosts stress busting endorphins, with a partner boosts stress relieving benefits, boosts energy and reduces fatigue.

Whether you are a Democrat, Republican or Independent, uncertainty about employment, schooling, worry about health of family and friends, and isolation, a daily walk can reduce stress and alleviate mild depression that you may be feeling.

Many of my favorite writers have been walkers. Henry David Thoreau, William Wordsworth, Walt Whitman, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Mahatma Gandhi connected the working of their minds to the steady movement of their feet.

Walking with a purpose is taken as a sign that people are focused, with eyes on the prize. But the art of walking is not about purpose or a prize. As Immanuel Kant maintained, the creation of beauty is embodied in a purposiveness without a definite purpose. The art of walking is all about this purposeless purpose.

We typically walk in order to get somewhere: the grocery store, get the mail, to confer with someone at work. We need to walk the dog or walk in protest like Murrays Womens March for Social Justice. We walk to get in shape, counting our steps on a Fitbit. Our walking becomes a matter of proving, achieving, gaining, or winning.

The frantic attempt to get somewhere, and to be on time, amounts to a Sisyphean struggle, a task that is endless. In Greek legend Sisyphus was punished in Hades for his misdeeds in life by being condemned eternally to roll a heavy stone up a hill.

When walking, we reach a destination, then we must immediately set off again, intent on the next stopping place, then again and again.

Walking is increasingly measured by technological gadgets worn on wrists. We spend an increasing amount of time screening our world using a smart phone screen that captures objects of immediate interest. Instead of asking What do I see? We are told instead how to see, and often what to feel much of which is determined by an algorithm.

Lets instead pursue the art of walking, the opposite of screening the world we live in, and no set of rules. Walking can be a brief respite in our coronavirus stressed lives, allowing us to see life for ourselves again, not unlike a child does. In walking, we can just step out the front door, pay attention, and perceive and feel.

As a pilgrim, or an evening stroller, the pilgrim ambles for the sake of a blessing; an evening stroller may seek digestive benefits, whether walking with a companion or encountering neighbors along the way.

When we walk without a goal, there is a certain beauty in the awareness of being fully alive while moving through a given space in time. This experience cannot be gotten on a page or a smartphone screen, but only through eyes, ears, nose and skin: the sensation of light, of a buildings grace, of streams and rocks, wind and leaves, fragrances of nature, and a boundless horizon.

Someone might say, what is the point of simply ambling along? This would be like asking what the point of watching a sunset is or smelling a rose. The answer is simple: for the experience alone.

A genuine experience of the art of walking is aimless, while we can experience sunsets, fragrance of flowers, and the sounds of animals and insects.

We can travel through this world by walking in a state of awareness. We can behold, rather than being told.

When we give ourselves over to the art of walking, we exist in the moment for no reason other than that of the experience alone, for the appreciation of beauty. There is no purpose in this occurrence, only the immeasurable effect it has on our nerves, our body, our being.

We have many excellent quiet neighborhoods, many miles of new sidewalks. We have a college campus with many possible circuits. Find a partner, practice social distancing, and take your mind off the stressors of this moment.

See you out there on the walkways at a safe!

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April 3rd, 2020 at 2:50 am

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This is why youre bored in quarantine – TRT World

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Philosophers and psychologists may provide an explanation for the tedium some of us feel during lockdown.

The nineteenth century German philosopher Freidrich Nietzsche once asked: Is life not a thousand times too short for us to bore ourselves?

Thats a question millions around the world, with the privilege of self-isolating themselves amid the coronavirus pandemic, now find themselves forced to confront.

Many developed states have either ordered mandatory curfews or strongly advised people to stay at home for all but essential trips. In some cases people are now starting their third week at home with the possibility that they could be stuck there for months more.

For many of those under lockdown, there may be remote working obligations, child care responsibilities, Zoom hangouts, exercise, or a newly found penchant for cleaning or cooking to provide a break from the tedium.

Nevertheless, the spectre of boredom lurks, appearing most frequently after a long and unsuccessful trawl of offerings on Netflix or when a book or mobile phone can no longer hold the attention. A pang of ache in the wrist while refreshing a Twitter feed can give way to that most dreaded of questions: So what now?

Why do we get bored?

The consequences of boredom are not trivial. Psychologists have long documented its link to the development of harmful habits, such as binge eating and substance abuse. People who are bored are also at heightened risk of developing depression and anxiety.

But at the same time, philosophers and scientists have had a hard time defining what boredom actually is and why we feel it.

A 2012 paper by psychologist John D Eastwood summarises boredom as the aversive experience of wanting, but being unable, to engage in satisfying activity.

Eastwood based that definition on the synthesis of four rival theories for the phenomenon. These are: the arousal, existential, psychodynamic, and cognitive theories of boredom.

For the sake of brevity and relevance, lets single out two of those.

The first- the arousal theory- seems most relevant to boredom induced by the lockdown. Eastwoods paper defines it as the nonoptimal arousal that ensues when there is a mismatch between an individuals needed arousal and the availability of environmental stimulation.

Put simply, we feel the urge to be stimulated but our environment is not able to satisfy that need.

Coronavirus-related lockdowns have restricted our stimulatory environments to our homes and social media. Whereas before the pandemic, there were cafes, nightclubs, and football stadiums, now we have only the contents and members of our homes, as well as those we can reach virtually through technology.

The second, the existential theory, has a more broader explanation on the phenomenon of boredom but can perhaps provide a way out of our current tedious impasse.

We will allow Eastwood to provide his definition before going our own way.

The York University academic explains: Existential theories argue that boredom is caused by a lack of life meaning or purpose; boredom ensues when an individual gives up on or fails to articulate and participate in activities that are consistent with his values.

He further describes existential boredom as: A sense of emptiness, meaninglessness and a paralysis of agency- the bored individual is unable to find impetus for action.

Boredom and the meaning of life

It seems like a dramatic jump to go from discussing the boredom felt while trying to find something good to watch on Netflix to talking about the meaning of life, but the two are intertwined, at least according to the existentialists.

Explaining philosophical ideas is hard at the best of times, let alone explaining their relevance to why you feel bored during an ongoing pandemic, so bear with us.

The starting point of existential thought is that all attempts at understanding the meaning of life start with the individual, and not an all governing cosmic order.

Human beings must reconcile the urge to find purpose in their existence, with the seeming indifference of the world around them. That inherent contradiction is the cause of anxiety, which philosophers have described as angst or dread.

Not many people are thinking about the purpose of their lives during their morning commute, shopping trip, or coffee date. Normal life provides plenty of distraction from the feeling of existential anxiety.

For some, the coronavirus pandemic will have created an upheaval of that sense of normality, exposing its construction on chaotic underpinnings, and forcing them to recognise the fundamental randomness of their environment.

This confrontation between individual purpose and chaotic reality can lead to an inertia from which boredom with everyday life is a byproduct - Ordinary activities lose their stimulatory appeal, as we can no longer find meaning in them.

Boredom and creativity

It is important to make clear that existential anxiety is not tied to specific temporary situations like the coronavirus lockdown but understanding it can provide a way out of the boredom some of us may currently feel.

Thats because for existentialist thinkers like Nietzsche and Danish theologian Soren Kierkegaard, boredom was not just a weight dragging down humans into the pits of despair, but could also be the impetus for dramatic individual change and transformation.

Nietzsche described boredom as the unpleasant calm that precedes creative acts.

While for Kierkegaard, it was our abhorrence of boredom that provided the impulse for creativity.

Boredom is the root of all evil. It is very curious that boredom, which itself has such a calm and sedate nature, can have such a capacity to initiate motion. The effect that boredom brings about is absolutely magical, but this effect is one not of attraction but of repulsion, he wrote.

There is some scientific evidence to support this link between boredom and creativity.

A 2012 study by Sandi Mann, an occupational psychologist at the University of Central Lancashire, suggested that participating in boring activities led to better performance in certain subsequent creative activities.

Interestingly, Manns research provides a possible mechanism for this link, suggesting that daydreaming may prove to be an important vector in turning boredom into creativity.

At the risk of oversimplifying, Manns explanation is summarised as follows: Boredom forces people to seek out forms of stimulation. Unable to find it externally, the focus shifts to internal thoughts and feelings, which manifests as daydreaming. That inner stimulation gained by daydreaming compensates for the external lack of stimulation. This leads to more creative problem solving.

With fewer external distractions due to the pandemic, it could be that many more of us start looking internally rather than externally for our sources of stimulation.

Recent articles by the Washington Post and the Atlantic have described how Isaac Newton and William Shakespeare wrote some of their greatest works during times of pandemic. It may well have been that a series of daydreams brought on by boredom gave the world calculus and Macbeth.

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Holocaust survivor’s book applies in these times | Opinion – westvalleyview.com

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The memoir will feel slight in your hands, only 165 pages long. Even so, for sheer insight per page, Mans Search For Meaning has no rival among books written in the last 100 years.

It is the story of Viktor Frankl, a psychiatrist from Vienna, and how he survived the Nazi death camps. It is a tale of extreme struggle, despair, loss, grief and the many ways in which life can challenge us.

In other words, a perfect book for life in the face of COVID-19.

I first read Frankls book while slogging through the crash of a marriage in my early 30s. The end of that relationship left me bitter, ashamed and feeling toxic on a daily basis.

Reading about the victims of Auschwitz and their suffering provided some much-needed perspective.

The Nazis took away everything Frankl valued: His wife, his mother, his father, his brother, his possessions, everything down to the manuscript he considered his lifes work.

What they could not steal was what Frankl describes as the last of the human freedoms to choose ones attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose ones own way.

Over the years, that quote has crossed my mind thousands of times: At the bedside of my mother as she wasted away in the hospital; in the face of professional disappointments and losses that made me angry, frustrated or despondent; while driving along the freeway and getting cut off by a moron; and over this past week, dealing with the fallout of the coronavirus outbreak.

Theres liberation in the idea: That ultimately we all get to choose our own attitude, no matter what happens around us or to us, no matter how life tests us.

Of course, Frankl wasnt done dispensing wisdom with one quote, which is why I have read his book at least once a year since the first time I picked it up.

He writes eloquently about surviving the icy cold march to a work site by fixing his imagination upon the face of his wife as he stumbled along for miles.

Her face, he explains, allowed him to grasp the greatest secret that human poetry and human thought and belief hold for us.

The salvation of man, Frankl writes, is through love and in love.

Re-reading the book again over the past few days, I found myself thinking, of all things, about a spat I witnessed in the grocery store: A grown man threatening an elderly woman for adding what he believed to be too many cans of soup to her shopping cart. Profanities flew. The old woman gave as good as she got.

Eventually they went off in separate directions trailing f-bombs in their wake, but not before the man delivered this pearl.

B-h, youll be dead soon enough anyways.

Frankl, whose book covers far greater deprivation than a lack of Campbells chicken noodle in a can, writes with insight about suffering and how it can lead us to find meaning in our lives. Suffering pushes us to live in one of two ways, he writes.

(We) may remain brave, dignified and unselfish. Or in the bitter fight for self-preservation he may forget his human dignity and become no more than an animal.

For Frankl, finding meaning in life is the ultimate goal. Twice he quotes Nietzsche on the subject: He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.

My thought: If the COVID-19 crisis tests us in the most profound ways, youll be glad you read the book. If not and Im just being overly dramatic, youll be glad anyways.

There are far worse ways to spend a couple hours in quarantine.

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Cold Chain Tracking and Monitoring Devices Market Report by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application Forecast 2019 2025 – Science In Me

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Cold Chain Tracking and Monitoring Devices Market

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Covid-19 life lessons from some of history’s greatest thinkers – TheArticle

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Pandemics reveal the true colours of human nature. Albert Camus argued as much in his novel The Plague the book which everyone is talking about (and which is now a bestseller for the first time since its publication in 1947).

Sure enough, with Covid-19 weve seen it all, from heroism, self-sacrifice and scientific endeavour to racism, ageism and mercenary self-preservation. Humans are both the salt of the earth and red in tooth and claw.

With that in mind and as a bit of light reading to keep you occupied in quarantine heres a brief look at what some of historys greatest thinkers might have to say about human behaviour (and the behaviour of governments) in the Age of Coronavirus.

Long before Jesus Christ, it was the Chinese philosopher Confucius who first espoused the Golden Rule: never impose on others what you would not choose for yourself. Or, as the government would put it: Stay home. Protect the NHS. Save lives.

Its fair to say that Aristotle would be struggling with social distancing and self-isolation. Man is, Aristotle wrote, by nature a social animal. Yet he would also be encouraged by the spirit of togetherness that Covid-19 has engendered in countries like the UK, for, according to Aristotle, the public is more important than the private.

I have seen all the works that are done under the sun; and, behold, allisvanity and vexation of spirit. So says the Preacher, or Ecclesiastes, in the Old Testament. The author remains unknown, but some say it is the son of David, King Solomon.In any case, considering the bookshelf boasting and video call vanity that has become par for the course in lockdown, its hard to disagree.

Thanks to Covid-19, an adjective which derives from a school of Ancient philosophy is making a comeback: stoic. One of Stoicisms most famous proponents was the Roman Emperor, Marcus Aurelius, whose Meditations provides many useful aphorisms for these uncertain times. Take this one: death smiles at us all, all a man can do is smile back.

You might feel like youre going through the Nine Circles of Hell, or Dantes Inferno,right now. But Dantewasnt just a religious poet. He also wrote about politics and government, arguing inDe Monarchiathat war and its causes would be eliminated if the whole earth and all that humans can possess can be a monarchy, that is, one government under one ruler. Last week, Gordon Brown made a similarargument about Covid-19.

Thomas Cromwell is all the rage right now thanks to Hilary Mantels Wolf Hall trilogy, but it is his rival, Thomas More, who we should be focusing on. After all, it was More who, in his seminal work, Utopia, popularised the idea of a universal basic income. Due to Covid-19, both the UK and US governments are now reconsidering their long-held hostility to the idea.

Writing at a time ravaged by both the Thirty Years War and the English Civil War, Thomas Hobbes compared his contemporaries lawlessness to what he called the state of nature a primordial mode of existence before laws and governments. In the state of nature, Hobbes argued that life is a war of all against all. If youve been in a supermarket recently, you wouldnt disagree.

As soon as any man says of the affairs of the state, What does it matter to me? the state may be given up as lost. So wrote Jean-Jacques Rosseau in The Social Contract. John F Kennedy recorded these words in one of his notebooks and, in his first inaugural address, asked Americans not to ask what their country could do for them, but what they could do for their country. David Cameron invoked Kennedy withhis Big Society agenda, but it is under Boris Johnson that nearly a million British people have volunteered to help the NHS.

Thomas Malthus, of Malthusian fame, would see a sinister silver lining in the Age of Coronavirus: rising mortality rates. Malthus argued that, if left unchecked, a population would outgrow its resources, leading to greater inequality and famine. Some of his ideas for keeping this in check included chastity, war and, you guessed it, plague.

Charles Darwin didnt coin the term survival of the fittest (that was Herbert Spencer), but it aptly sums up his theory of natural selection, the process by which a speciesadaptsin order tosurvive. Of course, with Covid-19, it is the least fit among us (the elderly and those with underlying health conditions) who are at most risk. And only time will tell how well the human race adapts to lockdown.

The man who provided the greatest intellectual challenge to the capitalist system would surely welcome the disruption that Covid-19 has brought upon the global economy. A universal income is on the cards, key workers are being applauded like never before and the rest of us, freed from the office, have escaped what Marx called the despotic bell. Working from home, we can now hunt in the morning and fish in the afternoon (or just watch TV all day) the communist life.

God is dead, proclaimed Friedrich Nietzsche, we have killed him. Indeed, whereas past pandemics like the Black Death and Spanish Flu were widely seen as works of divine punishment, the global reaction to Covid-19, with the exception of religious fanatics and Kourtney Kardashian, has been markedly nihilistic.

Unlike John Maynard Keynes, who would welcome both the lowering of interest rates and billion-pound stimulus packages, Friedrich Hayek will be turning in his grave. In The Road to Serfdom he argued that central planning and nationalisation lead to totalitarianism and warned against the pursuit of wartime measures in peacetime exactly the measures being introduced right now.

The pin-up of the Right, Ayn Rand wouldnt have a problem with stockpiling or wealthy Londoners fleeing to their second homes. Echoing Enlightenment figures such as Bernard Mandeville and Adam Smith, Rand believed in the the virtue of selfishness and questioned both the ethic of altruism and whether humans need a moral code at all. The individual, Rand believed, should exist for his own sake, neither sacrificing himself to others nor sacrificing others to himself.

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Tech companies making the people dance to their tune in India – H2S Media

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Friedrich Nietzsche, a renowned German philosopher, once said: Without music, life would be a mistake. And he was 100% right. Music has evolved out of movie theatres, radios and live shows to become our constant companion. Whether we are exercising, traveling, working or studying, music helps us do everything better. As much as we should thank the singers and the music industry for giving us our daily motivation, we should also be thankful to some consumer electronic brands who have taken several innovative measures, thereby making music portable. Especially for the young generation, carrying music along all the time is a prevalent and common phenomenon. However, some brands are dedicated to enabling their consumers to get the divine music experience with ultimate gadgets. Lets check out the brands that are leading in presenting innovative audio gadgets for the best possible user experience.

JBL is an American audio electronics company that was established in 1946. Its founder Mr James Bullough Lansing was an innovative engineer who laid the foundation for initial products offered by the company. Even though James ended his life in 1949 but his legacy lives on till today. JBL earned its fame by supplying high-end music equipment to touring artists and bands. Most music festivals and rock acts back then used JBL loudspeakers, making it a desirable brand. Today the brand offers a vast range of audio equipment both in professional and consumer categories.

Conceptualized in the early 2000s in France, ZOOOK has gained popularity for its agility in giving an instant makeover to the music delivery equipment and also making them more accessible. All the product offered by ZOOOK suggest their innovative outlook and are affordable, highly durable, and trendy! From earphones to heavy-duty party speakers, ZOOOK has developed powerful devices that are extremely comfortable to use, carry around and manage. With an increased userbase among the youngsters, they are already on their way to break stereotypes, open doors and explore the fantastic. The company has a strong brand presence across online and at offline trade channels retail stores, direct dealer channels, and e-commerce websites across the world.

This consumer electronics startup is based in India. boAt started its operations in 2016 intending to offer affordable, durable, and fashionable audio products and accessories to millennials. The company has a sharp focus on the quality of the products and has become popular among millennials for their earphones, headphones, speakers, travel chargers and premium rugged cables, etc. Today the company has created a niche for themselves in the Indian market by addressing common issues faced by millennials and Gen Z in terms of quality audio products. The company claims to work with the philosophy to create experiences and not products. So far, they have been able to win the hearts of millennials with their unique products.

Sennheiser is a German audio company that focuses on the designing and production of innovative audio products. The company offers a wide range of products under various categories such as microphones, headphones, telephony accessories and avionics headsets for personal as well as professional use. The brand is mainly famous for its headphones that provide a comfortable fit and a fantastic music experience. With time the company has been at the forefront to provide wireless transmission technology, conference and tour guide systems, aviation headsets, high-quality headphones, and headphone transducers and monitor systems.

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5 Themes of Nietzsche That You Can Apply to Your Life – Study Breaks

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Frederick Nietzsche, the 19th century German philosopher, transformed the fields of science and philosophy. His revolutionary ideas have drastically altered the history of modern intellectual thought, but during his lifetime, he amassed countless enemies with his antithetical beliefs toward religion and morality.

Following his renouncement of religion, he wrote a letter to his sister, explaining why he felt the need to leave the church. Nietzsche wrote, Hence the ways of men part: if you want to strive for peace of soul and pleasure, then believe; if you wish to be a devotee of truth, then inquire. Here are five ways that Nietzsches ideals can be applied to your own life.

Nietzsches search for moral truth in his life led him to question why humans feel the need to discover truth. He began his critique of truth by emphasizing that all life is perspective. He thought that because everyones life is different, their beliefs, judgments and actions will also differ. As our interpretations and judgments change, our perspective shifts, leading individuals to have different perceptions of morality.

This realization led Nietzsche to question why people feel the yearning for immutable laws to govern morality. Nietzsche asked himself the questions, Why truth rather than perspective? Why certainty rather than more interpretation? He postulated that our will to truth was not a natural desire.

Instead, Nietzsche believed that the human demand for rigid morality was a choice that we make out of fear, in order to convince ourselves that there is order in the universe. Nietzsche claimed that, because our will to truth forces us to base our beliefs in the perspectives of others, it glorifies the least creative parts of ourselves.

In these times of political uncertainty, we could all benefit from the wisdom of Friedrich Nietzsche. If we sought to understand others perspectives, instead of screaming at those we disagree with, we could move past our party differences.

Nietzsche realized that everyones values are different because they have distinctive perspectives. Everyone has different perceptions of life, so the truth is never black or white. People engaging in confirmation bias are obeying their will to truth, and subscribing themselves to a particular ideology, while ignoring other possible principles. Nietzsche teaches us that our beliefs should naturally change over time, as our judgments and perceptions of life change.

Instead of engaging in confirmation bias and believing only the facts that fit your narrative, attempt to gather facts from different perspectives. Nietzsche wants you to recognize that your will to truth is not a natural desire. Next time you think your beliefs are right and someone elses are wrong, remember that your values may not coincide with theirs, but that doesnt mean you cant understand their perspective. Instead of judging their beliefs, interpret them, and try to figure out what led them to that way of thinking.

If you think someones beliefs are wrong, silencing them will only push them further away. The only way for us to come to a mutual understanding is by creating a more open discussion, focused on respecting varied perspectives.

What weve called universal values, what we have called truth, has always only ever been the personal expressions of those who promoted them. Nietzsche

Nietzsche believed that universal morality is merely personal maxims that have been universalized for everyone to follow. He explains that the real values we hold are not based on the perspectives of others, but are expressions of who we are, and what feels powerful or life-giving to us. Nietzsche believed a rigid religious code creates what he called the herd mentality. Like a herd of animals, a herd mentality aims towards sameness, comfort and the preservation of its population.

The herd mentality puts the community over the individual, and limits creativity and independence. Nietzsche realized the universal codes he previously followed were nothing more than tools for enforcement, used by the herd to limit his free choices and individuality. Because universal morality requires us to adopt our beliefs from others perspectives, it limits our free expression and appeals to the least creative part of ourselves: the part that craves inflexible moral truth.

Rainer Maria Rilke was a poet during the late 19th and early 20th centuries whose writing was fueled by his fluctuating beliefs concerning an increasingly secular, war-torn Europe. Prominent Nietzsche themes appear in his poetry and, like Nietzsche, much of his work was not appreciated during his lifetime.

All who seek you test you. And those who find you, bind you to image and gesture. I would rather sense you, as the earth senses you. In my ripening, ripens what you are. Rilke

This is because they adopt the perspectives of others, who see God rigidly in image and gesture. They refrain from seeing God in different ways, thus restricting Gods influence on their lives. Rilke, like Nietzsche, believed that spiritual enlightenment could never be synonymous with conformity because enlightenment comes from the unknown, something you can sense but not conform to.

Instead of keeping your spiritual beliefs stagnant, try to evolve your spirituality and change it for the better when an opportunity presents itself. It is the changing perception of God, Rilke suggests, that changes people for the better.

Nietzsche suggested that we can move past our will to truth, and free ourselves from the entrapment of the herd mentality, by becoming beyond good and evil. Instead of falling victim to our will to truth and borrowing the values of others, we should awaken our will to power, which is our passion and drive to create our life in the image of what we value.

Nietzsches philosophy proposes that we say yes to whatever gives us meaning in our own lives the things we find value in personally. Many critics believe Nietzsche to be a promoter of anarchism because of his hatred of government and religion but, although his work has been frequently associated with anarchists, Nietzsche denied these claims.

I dont think his goal was to demonize the values of those organizations. He was merely pointing out problems in the structures of government and religion. His philosophy doesnt condemn specific values; instead, it condemns values that are adopted from others. Nietzsche maintained his criticism of organized religion throughout his life, but he also recognized that spirituality can grant immense value to some peoples lives.

Although some religious scholars see Nietzsche as an enemy to be disproved, I see him as someone who exposed obvious problems in religion because he wished for people to autonomously discover their own spirituality. His attacks on organized religion lead many spiritual folks to reject his insights, but his intention wasnt for people to abandon spirituality. His philosophy was a renouncement of his faith, not an attack on the faith of others.

Although many religious individuals find his work repulsive, I believe you can appreciate Nietzsche and still find meaning in religion. Nietzsche preached individual freedom of belief, whatever that belief may be.

Nietzsches ethics ask us to take a bold step. Eliminating our sources of truth in the world will most likely lead to nihilism, which is the belief that nothing has value or meaning. Many perceive nihilism as a negative or destructive perspective, but in contrast to the common view, Nietzsche believed nihilism is a prompting, or an opportunity that can enable us to reevaluate what gives value to our lives. Nietzsche believed that if we destroy our previous set of beliefs, and suffer the initial existential angst of nihilism, we can discover where our true values lie.

Many misinterpret his view as an endorsement of pessimism, but they couldnt be further from the truth. His view enables someone to experience the full depth of their character. Nietzsche advises a revision of self but doesnt require us to get rid of all of our past herd-built values. He is asking us to consider our existing values, as well as all other possibilities.

Nietzsche is not advising you to adopt a nihilistic outlook on life. He is saying that to find your own truths in life, you must first reject the truths given to you by the herd. To find value in your life, you cannot blindly follow the values of others. Next time you feel a loss of meaning in your life, interpret that depressed state as an opportunity for change. Instead of sulking in your perceived loss of self, realize that you feel that way because you avoided your true values. Look at nihilism as a gift that enables you to find true value by cleaning your slate of its narrow imitative beliefs.

What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus?

The greatest weight is a metaphorical situation put forth by Nietzsche. His goal was to make you think about what gives value to your life. Nietzsches hypothetical makes us ask ourselves if we would want to live eternally as we have been living. He proposes that most of us would curse the demon. The greatest weight is the feeling that crushes you into repeating past mistakes, and it is built from the unevaluated values you adopt from your herd.

Nietzsche suggests that in every little thing ask yourself, do you desire this once more and innumerable times over? If you change yourself and reevaluate your values, the weight can be lifted. However, if you remain under the same influences of the herd-prescribed guilt, you will become crushed under the weight, and submit to your unoriginal repetitive ways.

His vision, from the constantly passing bars, has grown so weary that it cannot hold anything else. It seems to him there are a thousand bars; and behind the bars, no world.

As he paces in cramped circles, over and over, the movement of his powerful soft strides is like a ritual dance around a center in which a mighty will stands paralyzed.

Only at times, the curtain of the pupils lifts, quietly. An image enters in, rushes down through the tensed, arrested muscles, plunges into the heart and is gone. Rilke

In Rilkes poem The Panther, he observed a panther behind the bars at a zoo, insightfully comparing the panthers will to live with that of mankinds. This poem examines how the greatest weight confines humankind to a subservient state. Like the panther, mankind lives behind bars. The panther is held captive in a cell made from human ingenuity, while mankinds personal jail cells are blandly pre-subscribed by social beliefs that captivate the wildness and individualism of the human spirit.

Humanitys confinement is built from its defined limitations. The social norms and beliefs of an individuals herd composes the bars of their prison, restricting that persons actions, and inhibiting their freedom of original self-expression. Rilke, like Nietzsche, recognized that we can escape our enclosure of forced beliefs and awaken ourselves to what we value personally. But, upon realizing all the bars that stand in the way of our dreams, many of us submit to the comfortability of our cage.

When you feel overtaken by the greatest weight, dont hide your wild aspirations in fear of them once again resurfacing. Break out of your self-made, herd-based enclosure and chase after the dreams that give meaning to your life.

Link:
5 Themes of Nietzsche That You Can Apply to Your Life - Study Breaks

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March 8th, 2020 at 10:45 am

Posted in Nietzsche

Dr. Schliemann or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Classics – Dartmouth Review

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On February 11th, Professor Curtis Dozier (Class of 00) spoke to a packed room about The Big One: The Fall of Rome and Contemporary Hate Groups. As the director of the Pharos Project out of Vassar College, Dozier seeks to combat the appropriation of the classical tradition by hate groups online through documenting appropriations, correcting the errors, omissions, and distortions that underpin these groupss interpretations, and to articulate a politically progressive approach to the study of Greco-Roman antiquity. While the stated purpose of his presentation was to discuss the appropriation of the fall of the Western Roman Empire by these groups, the discussion quickly took a broader focus.

Professor Doziers work with the Pharos Project falls into the domain of classical reception: the study of how antiquity and its relics have been portrayed, interpreted, and represented since. To introduce us to his work, he began with the case of The Colleges own Hovey Murals. Previously located in the basement of the Class of 53 Commons, the murals depict Eleazer Wheelock setting out into the wilderness to teach the Abenaki. Dozier asserts that implicit in these murals is the presentation of classical education as a civilizing influence: from the recurring presence of a Latin textbook Gradus ad Parnassum, to the Latin inscriptions, to the explicit reference to the Department of Classics on the panel of the first image. While the Hovey Murals are products of the early 20th century, Dozier sees the ideas represented as not just an artifact but emblematic of how white supremacists groups talk about a classical education todaya tool to preserve their warped understanding of Western Civilization.

At its most basic, this appropriation of the classical tradition is an appeal to authority. While they will often falsify the historical record, when they do use legitimate sources, they attempt to draw parallels from antiquity to inform our present behavior; our forefathers did this, and thus so should we. The fall of Rome occupies a special place in their thought as the Roman Empire is paradoxically something great and worthy of emulation, yet, something we need to account for the collapse of. Dozier asserts that this has led to the appropriation of scholarship to support whatever political agenda these groups wish to advance: Rome falls because of the barbarians at the gates; Rome falls because of the sexual liberation of women. Such claims pose a particular challenge to academics as, while these hate groups present simplified narratives with absolute certainty, to do so in response would be intellectually dishonest to the complexity of the scholarship. However, Dozier asserts that all of this debate only matters so long as we continue to view the fall of Rome as something that mattersone of the few assumptions that both those published in peer-reviewed journals and Reddit seem to agree. Why do we need it to matter? Why do the classics matter at all?

Dozier finds his answer in the re-appropriation of the classical tradition to advance his politically progressive agenda. Due to antiquities central place in academia, there is apossibly undeservedcache of authority in the classical tradition. Those who reference Greece and Rome sound intelligent. Thus contemporary scholars have an obligation to positively politicize the classical tradition such that it advances progressive narratives and creates new methodologies that place the consideration and advancement of the historically marginalized as central.

An example of this ideology in practice is Vassar College renaming its Department of Classics, the Department of Greek and Roman Studies. He asserts that no other disciplines name includes an implicit endorsement of the subject contained. We use the term classic to denote that which is essential to study, and thus the name classics implies antiquity is worthy of our study. Here is where Doziers argument begins to fall apart; etymological evidence shows that we should flip this causal chain. We use the term classic to denote something of value as the culture of antiquity was so universally considered vital that we borrowed its name. Classic comes from the Latin classicus, an adjective describing that which pertains to the patrician class. The use of the term to refer to those standard texts of exemplary quality emerges during the 6th century AD to refer to the products and pursuits of this patrician class. The classical predates the word classic.

I further object to Doziers deviation from the accepted methodology in his work rebutting the hate groups. While he asserts that the classics have always been secretly politicized in favor of a conservative agenda, and, he only wishes to do the same openly in a left-leaning manner, he is arguing for a false dichotomy. It may be true that the accepted scholarship contains biased actors and positions, but methodologically we should strive for apolitical accuracy. In deviating from the accepted methodology to arrive at a desired end, that which we create is equally erroneous as hate groups using the classics to further hateful ends. Regardless of the moral message, its still a case of motivated reasoning.

Similarly, Dozier presents the narratives constructed by these groups as problematic, but not why they are flawed beyond failing to compart with a progressive viewpoint. One example that was brought up during the talk is the case of Doziers attempt to debunk an interpretation of Juvenal the Satirist as sexists. When Dozier reached out to the experts in his field on Roman satire, to his surprise, they confirmed that the interpretation of the hate groups is historically accurate. This example demonstrates an intellectual dishonesty both in committing the logical fallacy of discrediting an argument because of the associated speaker and in his motivation to simply oppose these groups, not accurately document the history.

While these critiques are responses to Doziers answer to the question of the value of classics, if we dismiss his answer as fallacious, there is still the question of why do the classics matter? Why does the study of history matter at all beyond just existing as an appeal to tradition? Nietzsche provides an answer to this question in his essay On the Uses and Abuses of History for Life (1874); history is useful in so far as it serves life. The beasts of nature live unhistorically, acting in each moment before immediately forgetting. Man lives historically; his actions bound by the ever-increasing burden of the past, which weights against his ability to act. This burden finds its extreme in the superhistorical man, who knows so much that he is rendered entirely impotent. To put this point more colloquially: the man who knows everything fears everything. A person must know just enough to keep them safe, but not too much as to be paralyzed by fear. While we desire the bliss of an unhistorical existence, we, too, want the products of historicism. The obligation of the intellect is to mediate between these extremes. We must both be able to learn from the past but not be made useless by our knowledge of it. Thus, if knowledge breeds inaction, we must distinguish not only what we save but what we discardsacrificed as it has become unproductive to our ends.

Nietzsche continues that there are three types of history that each inspires different actions and dangers. Monumental History is that which preserves and motivates greatness yet can breed resentment if that greatness becomes mythical and unachievable. Antiquarian History is that which seeks to protect the tradition of our civilization yet can become fetishistic if too removed from its content and dangerous if in lieu we substitute in our own. Critical History is that which condemns the past for its failures yet can become so broad as to make one believes nothing matters lest it all be problematic. Much like how the quest of man is to mediate between the extremes of the unhistorical and superhistorical, so too must you navigate between the poles of history itself. Nietzsche saw his period as defined by the overabundance of knowledge that exclusively exists for its own sake. Those who generated this knowledge never asked why or reflected upon its value. Put succinctly, Nietzsche studied the classics because to do so served his life. It motivated greater action.

The hate groups Dozier discusses represent the extreme form of Antiquarian History, attempting to apply the past to the present without any regard for its context. As Nietzsche explains to these groups, it seems presumptuous or even criminal to replace such an antiquity with something new and to set up in opposition to such a numerous cluster of revered and admired things the single fact of what is coming into being and what is present. Hate groups have become so thoroughly invested in this unchanging conception of the past as to render all action which incites change impossible. As even the most celebrated scholars have an incomplete knowledge of the context of antiquity, those without this formal education dangerously substitute their own. Worse, they attempt to do this with falsification generated through unsound methodologies. This inability to make the present look like the past is what breeds their defining featureresentment.

Dozier himself, however, represents the extreme form of critical history. In so thoroughly condemning both antiquity and the tradition of studying it for its failures, he has concluded that it is of no inherent value. Thus, he can use it most cynically to advance his agenda. In the words of Nietzsche through this excess an age attains the dangerous mood of irony about itself and, from that, an even more dangerous mood of cynicism. He made this view clear to the audience when asked by Professor Michael Lurie of the Classics Department why it would not be philosophically consistent for him to resign his position. Tragically, Dozier concurred.

While there are valid conversations about the accessibility of Ivory Towers, the excess of critical history has led Oxford to consider removing Homer and Virgil as required reading in attempt to make classics more accessible. This is not unique to Oxfordseemingly the last refuge of classical educationbut the culmination of a process that has gone for the past century. Dartmouth does not require I read Homer for Classics or Shakespeare for English. However, in attempting to concede to the critical historian and in making things too available, we sacrifice the very value they contain.

I didnt come to Dartmouth to be a Classics major. I came here to learn; I came here to engage in the liberal arts; I came here to engage in an intellectual community. I thought I wanted to be a Government major but those people I most enjoyed talking with, who seemed the most shaped and inspired by what they studied, were the Classicists. Everything I found valuable about the classics does not relate at all to the criticisms Dozier madehe missed the point of classical education and history entirely.

Read more:
Dr. Schliemann or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Classics - Dartmouth Review

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March 8th, 2020 at 10:45 am

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(Audio) Pythia forecasts the next trend in consumer products – Startuprad.io

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The Enabler

This is a video interview from our podcast Tech Startups Germany. All the recordings on this channel are made possible by Invest in Hessen (learn more herehttps://www.invest-in-hessen.com/home).

We will post this interview and all others as podcast(s) next Tuesday night Central European Time. Subscribe here and have them on our device when you wake up:

Audio only Tech Startups Germany by Startuprad.io iTuneshttps://apple.co/2Z17bfl Deezerhttp://bit.ly/2Qbh1rl TuneInhttp://bit.ly/2M8vpzn Stitcherhttp://bit.ly/34xTANO Video Tech Startups Germany by Startuprad.io iTuneshttps://apple.co/2M8ZxKJ

We come to love the work ethics here. Frankfurt is a work minded city. Peter Hart during his Startuprad.io interview

In this interview for Invest-in-hessen.com we are talking to Peter Hart (https://www.linkedin.com/in/peter-hart-94373435/), a serial entrepreneur, based in Frankfurt. Despite being just 28 years old, Peter already launched 12 ventures. He started out back in 2015 with his consumer product brand Dr. Severin (https://drseverin.com/). During his first venture launch, Joe interviewed Peter in German back in 2015. We talk to him about his newest venture Pythia AI (https://www.pythia-ai.com/)

I dont divide between business books and private books. If you grow personally, you grow as a leader. Peter Hart during his Startuprad.io interview

We talk to him to learn more about his 12thventure, called Pythia AI (https://www.pythia-ai.de/). Pythia was started when Peter followed his data-driven approach to launch new consumer products and he got approached by Rossmann (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rossmann_(company)), Germanys 2ndlargest chain of drug stores. The drug store chain invested in the startup (https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/pythia#section-funding-rounds) to help them with forecasting trends for product development.

In case you are wondering: The venture is named after the priest, founding and serving the Oracle of Delphi in Greek mythology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythia).

Peter looks a bit tired in the interview, since he just returned from opening an office in Sunny Vale, in the Silicon Valley.

We are very happy with the talent pool here (in Frankfurt), especially the engineers. Peter Hart during his Startuprad.io interview

During his time in Silicon Valley, Peter wanted to reach out to venture capital investors. He went along the two main streets where they are headquartered and knocked on their doors. Surprisingly this was very successful, and it appears no one has done this before.

Despite knocking on many doors in Silicon Valley, Pythia is not done with their fundraising and they are looking for additional investors for their Series A fundraising.

I think philosophy goes really well with business. You formulate a more concrete business philosophy. Peter Hart during his Startuprad.io interview

Pythia forecasts the next trend in consumer products

Principles by Ray Daliohttps://amzn.to/38ZgmB7

The man who solved the markethttps://amzn.to/2SZ6Jgw

What You Do Is Who You Are: How to Create Your Business Culturehttps://amzn.to/2SYi00x

The little princehttps://amzn.to/3c6hWDm

Friedrich Nietzsches Books:

Herman Hesses Books

Before the Top Book List we talked about The hard thing about hard thingshttps://amzn.to/32symSb

Herman Hessehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_Hesse

Friedrich Nietzschehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Nietzsche

Arthur Schopenhauerhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Schopenhauer

And maybe you want to have a look at the often quoted VC Ben Horowitzhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Horowitz

This is a video interview from our podcast Tech Startups Germany. All the recordings on this channel are made possible by Invest in Hessen (learn more here https://www.invest-in-hessen.com/home).

We will post this interview and all others as podcast(s) next Tuesday night Central European Time. Subscribe here and have them on our device when you wake up:

Audio only Tech Startups Germany by Startuprad.io iTunes https://apple.co/2Z17bfl Deezer http://bit.ly/2Qbh1rl TuneIn http://bit.ly/2M8vpzn Stitcher http://bit.ly/34xTANO Video Tech Startups Germany by Startuprad.io iTunes https://apple.co/2M8ZxKJ

We come to love the work ethics here. Frankfurt is a work minded city. Peter Hart during his Startuprad.io interview

In this interview for Invest-in-hessen.com we are talking to Peter Hart (https://www.linkedin.com/in/peter-hart-94373435/), a serial entrepreneur, based in Frankfurt. Despite being just 28 years old, Peter already launched 12 ventures. He started out back in 2015 with his consumer product brand Dr. Severin (https://drseverin.com/). During his first venture launch, Joe interviewed Peter in German back in 2015. We talk to him about his newest venture Pythia AI (https://www.pythia-ai.com/)

I dont divide between business books and private books. If you grow personally, you grow as a leader. Peter Hart during his Startuprad.io interview

We talk to him to learn more about his 12th venture, called Pythia AI (https://www.pythia-ai.de/). Pythia was started when Peter followed his data driven approach to launch new consumer products and he got approached by Rossmann (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rossmann_(company)), Germanys 2nd largest chain of drug stores. The drug store chain invested in the startup (https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/pythia#section-funding-rounds) to help them with forecasting trends for product development.

In case you are wondering: The venture is named after the priest, founding and serving the Oracle of Delphi in Greek mythology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythia).

Peter looks a bit tired in the interview, since he just returned from opening an office in Sunny Vale, in the Silicon Valley.

We are very happy with the talent pool here (in Frankfurt), especially the engineers. Peter Hart during his Startuprad.io interview

During his time in the Silicon Valley, Peter wanted to reach out to venture capital investors. He went along the two main streets where they are headquartered and knocked on their doors. Surprisingly this was very successful, and it appears no one has done this before.

Despite knocking on many doors in the Silicon Valley, Pythia is not done with their fundraising and they are looking for additional investors for their Series A fundraising.

I think philosophy goes really well with business. You formulate a more concrete business philosophy. Peter Hart during his Startuprad.io interview

Principles by Ray Dalio https://amzn.to/38ZgmB7

The man who solved the market https://amzn.to/2SZ6Jgw

What You Do Is Who You Are: How to Create Your Business Culture https://amzn.to/2SYi00x

The little prince https://amzn.to/3c6hWDm

Friedrich Nietzsches Books:

Herman Hesses Books

Before the Top Book List we talked about The hard thing about hard things https://amzn.to/32symSb

Herman Hesse https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_Hesse

Friedrich Nietzsche https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Nietzsche

Arthur Schopenhauer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Schopenhauer

And maybe you want to have a look at the often quoted VC Ben Horowitz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Horowitz

Follow this link:
(Audio) Pythia forecasts the next trend in consumer products - Startuprad.io

Written by admin

March 8th, 2020 at 10:45 am

Posted in Nietzsche

Red Sparrow, Jennifer Lawrence, and the movement #metoo – Play Crazy Game

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Jennifer Lawrence makes the secret agent of Russian are in Red Sparrow by Francis Lawrence (not related to work, by the second Chapter of the trilogy the Hunger Games). Charlize Theron the secret agent of the British Atomic Blonde by David Leitch had. Woe, to think that the films have something in common. Has forbidden, one interview after the other, Jennifer Lawrence. In the course of time released, of course, who wanted to put him a coat, as he on the terrace, in london, moved out Versace. You answered that with a dress an hour or so of frost, other that the five minutes are required, the photos would be it. And in the rest of the no woman has ever taken a cold, owing to which it is a backless dress (Friedrich Nietzsche, as quoted him Ennio Flaiano in language guide is important to not go unnoticed in the society; whether true or well invented, hits the point).

Red Sparrow is not Atomic Blonde, says Jennifer, for this thing called the female gaze, the last category of criticism received in the course of the harassment, and the movement #metoo. In the meantime, in terms of the Oscars, two of the artists, which was sitting not far away from the Dolby theatre is a statue of Harvey Weinstein in a Bathrobe on the sofa, a statuette in hand as bait. The Female gaze in contrast to male gaze, the previously imperato. View of women against the male gaze. Always, that it is impossible to distinguish, without trust, only intentions are. After you have read and approved the screenplay, Jennifer Lawrence is the veto has on the result. If a scene has not mentioned it, or he felt uncomfortable, the Director would have the cut in the Assembly. The film version of the agreement, ribadirsi step-by-step. A kind of final cut in sex (the other final cut not even the filmmakers, because then the dvd with the directors cut is usually longer and boring; with the gender of the trend could be reversed, who would not want to see the cutscenes from Jennifer?).

To see the movie two hours and twenty for a history of spies, you should access the whole not see a big difference just. Naked there and it seems the same to many others. We hope it served at least as Jennifer explained undressed the control over his body after the hack photo private use, in the year 2014. Very well, we are satisfied that the healing has worked. Now Jennifer is a little bit of control over his films again. The Oscars, the risk at a young age, the career, the power of the statuette as best actress in a receipt in the year of 2013 for The positive side there is no exception. Two games for the ex-ballerina of the Bolshoi theatre, after the accident is taken up as a spy (in order to ensure that hospitals are decent mother sick) are a big step in the right direction.

Read the original here:
Red Sparrow, Jennifer Lawrence, and the movement #metoo - Play Crazy Game

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March 8th, 2020 at 10:45 am

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