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Archive for the ‘Enlightenment’ Category

Where To Buy The Nike Kyrie 6 Enlightenment – Sneaker News

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Unlike the one-time NBA champion behind the sneaker, the Nike Kyrie 6 is not welcoming the last month of the decade on the sidelines, as it is dropping in yet another concept-driven colorway dubbed the Enlightenment edition. Outfitted in a dark-purple engineered mesh and suede upper, this latest iteration of Irvings sixth signature sneaker with the Swoosh presents the heel eye graphic in a gum-pink color, making the symbol more visible at different angles to toy with the idea of perspective. The hits of yellow, red, green, and blue found on the tongue logo, lace holders, and outsole are inspired by camera light filters used to change images and films, and thus alter perception. Check out a complete store list below to see where these are dropping, and expect them to release in full family sizes on Nike.com and at affiliated retailers on December 7 for $130 (adults), $80 (kids), and $55 (infants).

Nike Kyrie 6 Enlightenment Release Date: December 7th, 2019 $130 (Adults) $80 (Kids) $55 (Infants) Style Code: BQ4630-500

Make sure to follow @kicksfinder for live tweets during the release date.

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Where To Buy The Nike Kyrie 6 Enlightenment - Sneaker News

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‘See’ Episode 8 Review: Haniwa and Kofun bear the price of enlightenment in this dark episode – MEAWW

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"The gift of sight can be blinding," Paris (Alfre Woodard) had ominously told Haniwa (Nesta Cooper) and Kofun (Archie Madekwe) in the previous episode of 'See', as they approached Jerlamarel's House Of Enlightenment.

And the children learn the meaning behind her words in this gripping episode, titled 'House Of Enlightenment'. Jerlamarel's House of Enlightenment is reminiscent of the witch's house in the age-old cautionary tale of 'Hansel and Gretel'.

While the witch's house was covered in chocolates, candies, cakes and other sweet things to entice two lost and hungry children, Jerlamarel's 'civilized' house possesses the same amount of fascination for Haniwa and Kofun.

Apart from finding a father who had never looked in their direction for 17 years, the twins are in awe of the facilities available to them.

Indeed, they seem to have entered a new era of knowledge, as they grasp the concept of a hot shower, different clothes that include shirts and trousers, as well as books.

Jerlamarel, like any good host, takes them around the house and introduces them to his children, who also possess the gift of sight, unlike the normal dystopian world Haniwa and Kofun have grown up in.

The house possesses practically everything from our modern world. The land of milk and honey, or is it?

While Haniwa is willing to give this new world a chance, Kofun still misses Baba Voss (Jason Momoa), the father who took care of him all these years, rather than their biological father.

The viewer knows that it can't be this easy, and the discomfort slowly seeps in, especially at Jerlamarel's overtly enthusiastic welcome and fondness. And sure enough, events begin to spiral radically out of control.

Betrayal becomes the order of the day. Kofun can also helplessly stare as he faces separation from Haniwa. Though Baba Voss comes in to save the day, even he is not able to salvage much apart from a gruesome Game Of Throne-esque murder.

However, hope is not lost, and the episode ends with Baba, Paris and Kofun finding a small chance of being reunited with Haniwa again.

While this drama is taking place, Tamacti Jun (Christian Camargo) entrusts Maghra (Hera Hilmar) with an uneasy task: Convince Kane (Sylvia Hoeks) to abdicate the throne.

A fool's fantasy, Kane reminds her. In her haze of delusional grandeur, Kane says that it is all god's will. Ironically Kane makes the revealing statement, "There is no succession, there is no majesty, no legitmacy, there's just a petty lie, agreed upon by petty people." What a hard-hitting statement.

If Maghra must defy god's will, then she must do the honorable thing of "picking up a knife" and taking what is hers. Maghra echoes what we've all been thinking, "God's law, god's words, god's choice, it's amazing how they all align with whatever you want at any given time."

And later in the episode, the tables are quickly turned, and Kane makes a decision that is in her favor again. There's a hint of a very uncomfortable union ahead, if Maghra allows it, that is.

Another point to note is Maghra has still not forgotten her family in the least and has something planned for them. That would be an interesting meeting, considering that they believe she is dead.

While the action scenes are always thrilling to watch, 'See' delivers the best performances, when it is surrounded by silence. With its facade of paradise, false cheer and seeming subservience, the episode could best be described as an uneasy itch that slowly devolves into a rash.

The performances by Kane and Maghra with its undertones of tension and resentment are the highlight of the episode.Episode 8 of 'See' released on Apple TV on December 6.

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'See' Episode 8 Review: Haniwa and Kofun bear the price of enlightenment in this dark episode - MEAWW

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Briefly Noted Book Reviews – The New Yorker

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The Cheffe, by Marie NDiaye, translated from the French by Jordan Stump (Knopf). At the heart of this novel is a character study of a brilliant chef, filtered through the perception of her most obsessive disciple, a much younger man to whom she is fairy godmother, mother, and beloved. His attraction propels a spiralling family psychodrama, whose richness and suspense are surpassed by those of scenes depicting the chefs exquisite inventions, from a signature green-robed leg of lamb to sweet crabmeat poached in absinthe. NDiaye creates an arresting portrait of a self-effacing genius, as the chef yearns to leave only a vague, marveling recollection in the eaters minds... only a dish, or just its name, or its scent, or three bold, forthright colors on a milky white plate.

Mary Toft; or, The Rabbit Queen, by Dexter Palmer (Pantheon). In a small English village at the dawn of the Age of Enlightenment, a woman named Mary Toft gives birth to a dismembered rabbit every few days. Whether her plight is a medical miracle, an elaborate hoax, or a shared moment of collective delusion is the conundrum of this frolicsome period comedy. The young surgeon who cares for Toft becomes renowned as an expert in human-leporine midwifing, and, when word of Toft reaches King Georges court, she is summoned with the surgeon and his apprentice to London, where they become entwined in the bizarre and barbarous world of the upper classa visit that exposes the chasm between provincial innocence and metropolitan cunning.

Parisian Lives, by Deirdre Bair (Nan A. Talese). The author of this sparkling memoir achieved two of the greatest coups in literary biography: writing a semi-authorized life of Samuel Beckett, which the gnomic Irishman promised to neither help nor hinder, and a life of Simone de Beauvoir, which was based on interviews conducted immediately before the philosophers death. Bair spent seven years on Beckett and ten on Beauvoir, and her dedication to her subjects is apparent. Into her accounts of working with these eminent, often exasperating writers she weaves recollections of malfunctioning tape recorders, grandstanding sources, and her travails as a professional and a mother commuting across the Atlantic, working in a field dominated by men.

Medieval Bodies, by Jack Hartnell (Norton). Elegantly combining strands from the histories of medicine, art, and religion, this study explores how the medieval world understood and treated the human body. In the late Middle Ages, medicine sought natural as well as mystical causes for all manner of afflictions, making diagnosis a complex affair (stringy hair, for instance, might indicate an unscrupulous character, while baldness resulted from an excess of heat). Focussing on Byzantium, the Islamic world, and the patchwork of kingdoms constituting western and central Europe, Hartnell deftly shows how these societies visual cultures were, like their medical theories, profoundly influenced by a symbolic understanding of humanitys relationship to realms seen and unseen.

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Briefly Noted Book Reviews - The New Yorker

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Are you enlightened to your own stressful thinking right now? That’s the only enlightenment that matters Byron Katie – Thrive Global

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Byron Katie has said When someone loves what is, she makes use of anything life happens to bring her way, because she doesnt con herself anymore. Katies own life is a testament to this statement. In 1986, at the bottom of a ten-year spiral into depression, rage and self-loathing, she woke up one morning to a state of joy that has never left her. She realized that when she believed her stressful thoughts, she suffered, but that when she questioned them, she didnt suffer, and that this is true fo every human being. Her simple yet powerful process of inquiry is called The Work.

Katie has been bringing The Work to millions of people for more than thirty years. Her public events, workshops, intensives, School for The Work and Turnaround House have brought freedom to people all over the world. Her books include the bestselling Loving What Is and A Mind At Home With Itself. To discover all about The Work and so much more, enjoy the videos below.

Judge your neighbor, write it down, ask four questions, turn it around just one at a time:

Watch our full conversation here:

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Are you enlightened to your own stressful thinking right now? That's the only enlightenment that matters Byron Katie - Thrive Global

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Explainer: the ideas of Kant – The Conversation AU

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It was claimed Immanuel Kants routine was so predictable his neighbours could set their clocks by his daily walk.

Born in 1724 in the Prussian town of Knigsberg (now Kaliningrad, Russia), Kant had a strict education and traditional Protestant upbringing. At 16, he enrolled at university to study philosophy.

After a time working as a tutor and lecturer, in 1770 Kant was appointed Professor of Logic and Metaphysics at the University of Knigsberg. He never married, and seems never to have left his home town again after 1754.

But from this small Prussian town, his ideas spread to influence science, religion, politics and art to this day.

Read more: Explainer: the ideas of Foucault

During Kants lifetime, people believed God had created us to understand the world perfectly. But the rise of modern science challenged this view.

In Critique of Pure Reason (1781), Kant argued the way the world seems is not an accurate reflection of how it really is.

He said our minds create a picture of the world based on what we perceive through our senses. Knowledge is not simply a representation of external reality: it is a construction.

This was a new and controversial idea. It implied that, since we cannot experience God through the senses, we cannot know that God exists we can only have faith in his existence.

In a still largely Christian Europe, Kant was censored for these views. In 1793, the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm II threatened Kant with punishment if he published further on religion.

Despite censorship, questioning of God remained central to Kants work.

In Critique of Practical Reason (1788), Kant asked how we know what we should do. Through faith in God, he said, we have access to a moral law that tells us how to act.

At the centre of Kants ethical theory was the categorical imperative: we must always act in such a way that we believe would be just under a universal law.

Perhaps it is easiest to understand this as a version of the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Kant wanted to understand the natural world, but he was also curious about how it makes us feel. In Critique of Judgement (1790), Kant wondered why people found gardens and pastoral settings beautiful, while mountains and the night sky invoked a frightened awe he called the sublime.

Kant believed we experience terror in the face of nature when it reminds us of our own small and fleeting place on earth. Kants theory of the sublime inspired a generation of artists in awe of the mysterious powers of nature.

Many of Kants ideas are now outdated.

Kant believed that certain differences between people are innate. In On the Different Human Races (1775), he argued there is only one human species but people of different races have different inborn characteristics and abilities.

These ideas helped to establish a pseudo-scientific basis for racism, which was used to justify colonial oppression and genocide.

By considering European societies as the ideal model of human development, Kant argued that not all races were capable of achieving the same level of civilization as European ones. This aspect of Kants thinking reveals how racism has historically been deeply entangled with the concept of civilization.

Kant was a public intellectual who wrote for a broad audience. As more people became educated and literate, a public sphere emerged in which people engaged in reasoned debate: the age of Enlightenment.

The term Enlightenment was first used in 18th century France, but Kant gave us the classic definition. In An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment? (1784), Kant wrote that Enlightenment was about people thinking freely for themselves - rather than relying on authorities.

Although Kant believed in free speech, he was not a democrat. In the Enlightenment essay, he praised the institution of monarchy, and was quick to condemn the violence of revolutions.

Kant believed that political freedom would increase through gradual historical progress rather than through revolution. In Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch (1795), he imagined a future secured by an international federation of republics.

We are far from the future of perpetual peace Kant imagined, but his ideas are still relevant for thinking through modern challenges.

His theory of knowledge still broadly underpins modern science. When scientists create models, they understand that these are representations not the real thing.

Kants theory of the sublime can help us to understand why climate change provokes such strong feelings in us: it makes us reflect on our own transience.

His ideas about Enlightenment influence debates about education and free speech, and his concept of international federalism can be seen in the United Nations.

Many scholars and activists still appeal to Kant to understand the origins of some of our most faulty and deeply entrenched ideas about race.

Finally, in a time of tightening borders, Kants concepts of world citizenship and universal hospitality can provoke us to think critically about peace, migration, and international relations.

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Explainer: the ideas of Kant - The Conversation AU

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The 1619 Project Is Reshaping How We Teach Slavery But Is It Enough? – The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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This past August, the New York Times released the 1619 Project, a compendium of journalism and poetry examining the 400 years since enslaved Africans arrived on American soil.

The multimedia project has been widely lauded as the first mainstream journalism to reframe American history, centering the arrival of those first few dozens of enslaved Africans. Now, in partnership with the Pulitzer Center, the work at the core of the project is making its way into classrooms across the country including many here in the D.C. region.

But critics argue the project is biased, incomplete, or even incorrect in its thesis. You could say the same thing about the English common law, for example, or the use of the English language, argued a such critic in New York Magazine. You could say that about the Enlightenment. Or the climate. You could say that Americas unique existence as a frontier country bordered by lawlessness is felt even today in every mass shooting. You could cite the death of countless millions of Native Americans by violence and disease as something that defines all of us in America but that would be to engage in a liberal inquiry into our past, teasing out the nuances.

New York Times staff writer Nikole Hannah-Jones, who led the project, says every component was thoroughly fact-checked and verified to ensure the arguments were sound. But the core question of whether a retelling of history can ever be really complete remains especially when studies show so few American students are taught much of anything about slavery.

Well learn more about the 1619 Project and curriculum from a local journalist, then hear from a high school teacher whos used the material and a college professor who has pushed back against it.

Produced by Maura Currie

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The 1619 Project Is Reshaping How We Teach Slavery But Is It Enough? - The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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Battling the Blues Part 2: Nurture the spirit – Steamboat Pilot & Today

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Editors note: This is part two in a series of four articles exploring the causes of and ways to combat winter blues. The focus of the series is on mental health and strategies for improving your state of mind through physical activity, spirituality, diet and community and connections.

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS Wherever you find your spirituality, research shows that finding that connection that meaning can provide a buffer against depression.

For whatever struggles or loss someone might be facing, the holidays can be an especially difficult time, said Dr. Jo Ann Grace the spiritual health care coordinator and bereavement counselor for Northwest Colorado Healths hospice program. People may inside feel really sad but are caught between everyone being joyful its a paradox of emotions that can happen at the same time.

Whether or not you worship a god or take part in an organized religion, Grace said, Its about connections, relationships, spirituality and how you are finding meaning in the midst of the holiday season.

For some, especially living in a place surrounded by spectacular natural beauty, that connection to something larger or sense of deep gratitude, awe and peace can be found on a mountaintop or at the edge of a pristine lake.

Nature is one of the most underutilized treasures in life. It has the power to unburden hearts and reconnect to that inner place of peace, wrote Dr. Janice Anderson and Kiersten Anderson in their book Off Beat Enlightenment, which focuses on different ways to find inner peace, health and happiness.

The quest for spirituality and meaning can be one that is ever-evolving, ever-growing and change throughout a persons life.

Where do you look for this hope that you know is there? Bob Dylan queried in his poem, Last Thoughts on Woody Guthrie. You can either go to the church of your choice/ Or you can go to Brooklyn State Hospital.

That spiritual quest and search for meaning gets at thinking about what it means to be human, said Grace. And connection where you can make those connections that allows you to be most fully yourself.

Grace is also a neuroscientist, helping people in her private practice to understand the connections between the brain, body and spirit.

In her work, Grace has found that when people are in a period of grief, they can find relief by focusing on what they most value and where they feel free and fully engaged whether that be worshipping a god, practicing yoga, digging in the garden or riding a horse.

And in addition to the individual component, theres also a communal component, she said. Our brain needs to connect to a tribe.

In the study of the Blue Zones, the locations across the globe with the highest percentage of centenarians, several of the top keys to longevity are finding a sense of purpose, belonging to a community and the nurturing of ones religion or spirituality.

The Blue Zone research attributed physical and mental benefits to spirituality.

People who pay attention to their spiritual side have lower rates of cardiovascular disease, depression, stress and suicide, and their immune systems seem to work better. To a certain extent, adherence to a religion allows them to relinquish the stresses of everyday life to a higher power, said Dan Buettner, Blue Zones founder.

Religiosity and spirituality have been shown to cause changes in the brain, such as increasing serotonin.

There is also an increasing amount of research on the benefits of the practice of meditation and mindfulness being fully aware of the moment to both physical and mental health and combatting the blues.

Meditation trains the brain to achieve sustained focus and to return to that focus when negative thinking, emotions and physical sensations intrude which happens a lot when you feel stressed and anxious, according to Dr. John W. Denninger, director of research at the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine.

On Thursday, Dec. 12, Grace is co-facilitating the Blue Christmas service at 6 p.m. at St Pauls Episcopal Church in Steamboat Springs.

It is a nondenominational service to support individuals who are grieving or feeling down this holiday season.

The service is a chance for people to gather together, write a name or message on a star and hang it on a tree, light a candle and honor a person or honor the self and recognize the transition you are going through, Grace said. And recognize you are not by yourself other people are going through similar experiences.

To reach Kari Dequine Harden, call 970-871-4205, email kharden@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @kariharden.

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Battling the Blues Part 2: Nurture the spirit - Steamboat Pilot & Today

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Williamson brings consciousness, peace to Perry message Monday – theperrynews.com

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Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson addressed about 20 Perry-area voters Monday morning in downtown Perry.

Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson addressed about 20 Perry-area voters Monday morning in downtown Perry, bring her message of higher consciousness and peace seeking to to the campaign trail.

The event was free and open to the public as a public service by the Perry-Area Democrats.

Williamson has sold more than 3 million books worldwide, with millions of people attending her lectures over a 35-year career focused on spiritual enlightenment and well being. Her most recent works include A Politics of Love: A Handbook for a New American Revolution, published in 2019, and Tears to Triumph: The Spiritual Journey from Suffering to Enlightenment, from 2016.

One of Williamsons signature campaign promises was a call for between $100 billion and $500 billion in reparations for African-American slavery to be distributed over 10 years by a group of black leaders for economic and education projects.

My campaign for the presidency is dedicated to the search for higher wisdom, Williamsons website says. Its purpose is to create a new political possibility in America where citizens awaken, our hearts and minds are uplifted and our democracy once more becomes a thing about which we can all feel proud.

Williamsons issue statements are available online on the campaign website.

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Williamson brings consciousness, peace to Perry message Monday - theperrynews.com

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Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn Lied About Purging Anti-Semitism From the Party – PJ Media

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The Simon Wiesenthal Center has named Britain's Labor Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn the top anti-Semite of the year -- an honor that Corbyn enjoyed once before.

How proud his mother must be.

With the parliamentary elections scheduled for Thursday and Corbyn's Labor Party trailing Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Conservatives badly, the last thing Labor needs is to be exposed as a bunch of Hitler mini-mes. But the august Times of London has published an article detailing a massive leak of internal Labor Party documents. The article shows not only that anti-Semitism is running rampant in the party, but that Corbyn's promise that Labor is dealing with its anti-Semitism is a lie.

Times of Israel:

Jewish groups and others have rung alarm bells over the prospects of party leader Jeremy Corbyns promotion to No. 10 Downing Street with increasing distress as the December 12 British election has approached, accusing the far-left politician of allowing a massive rise in anti-Semitism within the ranks of the party, and of being anti-Semitic himself.

There are also recordings of meetings that show dozens of cases of anti-Semitism languishing for more than a year with no action being taken.

What kind of anti-Semitism are we looking at?

It reportedly took the party more than ten months to expel a staffer from Nottingham who last year said that Jews represent a viral infection that need to be completely eliminated and added that he wanted the complete extinction of all Jews.

The party refused to say whether it had referred that case to the police.

And when the party finally gets around to "disciplining" members, not much is done. The report notes that "half of 100 cases dealt with between the summer of 2018 and May, 2019 ended with no action taken or with just a warning, the report said. Some members were ordered to attend diversity training which Labour has not set up."

Guess they sort of forgot that part.

Meanwhile, the Simon Wiesenthal Center is extremely worried:

If Jeremy Corbyn wins, he will make Britain a pariah on the world stage, Hier said. To have a person seeking the highest office who ignored anti-Semitism for years, who did everything in his power to encourage it is shocking.

I always thought the motto "Never Forget" was redundant in western countries. How could educated people "forget" six million people were slaughtered?

As it turns out, it still wasn't enough for some people. It's not a question of remembering. It's a matter of hate, fear, and loathing. And when people who believe that way get in power, you get camps, persecution, and gas chambers.

The British people are about to be tested as few modern societies have ever been; whether to embrace Medieval superstition and unreasoning fear or walk in the light of enlightenment and knowledge. Ordinarily, it would be silly to dub Boris Johnson a defender of Enlightenment values. But compared to Corbyn and his Nazi wannabees? No contest.

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Labour's Jeremy Corbyn Lied About Purging Anti-Semitism From the Party - PJ Media

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Exposing the Secret Cost of IVF: Heartbreak and a Second Mortgage – PR Web

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"The IVF Talks" is a patient-centered event taking place on February 9th in Los Angeles, CA.

LOS ANGELES (PRWEB) December 09, 2019

As rising numbers of couples and individuals experience infertility and undergo treatment like in-vitro fertilization (IVF), the true costs to their emotional and financial welfare are being chronicled. Industry experts are calling for emphasis on knowledge, community and enlightenment as a counterweight to the stress and unsavory practices some providers engage while marketing expensive services and medication to patients. It is time to educate and enlighten people struggling to have a family, so they can gain a sense of emotional control over their fertility. There is a tremendous need for transparency in this industry, whether it be informational, financial, or emotional. said Rozanne Sher, co-organizer of The IVF Talks, a patient-focused event scheduled for February 9 in Los Angeles, Calif. People need to feel empowered when undergoing such an emotionally draining experience. Knowledge is power. Our goal is to arm them with expert information so they will be well equipped to tackle the emotional and financial minefield along their journey to family.

According to a report published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 12 and 13 percent of American couples will experience some difficulty starting a family [1]. This number is expected to continue to grow in the coming years, as more women delay having a child and turn to IVF when ready. Studies show that the annual IVF cycle volume in the U.S. has grown 70 percent from 2005 to 2015 [2].

The CDC reports that out of about four million births per year in the U.S., 80,000 babies are via IVF. The success rate in the U.S is as follows:

The emotional toll the process takes on couples is significant. One Harvard paper reported that a study of 200 couples seen consecutively at a fertility clinic found that half of the women and 15 percent of the men said that infertility was the most upsetting experience of their lives. Another study cited in the same paper found that women with infertility felt as anxious or depressed as those diagnosed with cancer, hypertension, or recovering from a heart attack [4]." Moreover, the medications intended to treat infertility may themselves contribute to patient despair. The same Harvard paper linked them to side effects that can include depression, mania, irritability, and thinking problems.

Financial imperatives contribute to patient stress. The average cost of a single IVF cycle in the U.S. is between $12,000 and $15,000 and on average, it costs $50,000 to conceive a child through IVF [5]. Although 16 states have passed laws that require insurers to either cover or offer coverage for infertility diagnosis and treatment, most plans dont cover it.

That means most of the associated costs of infertility treatment are paid for in cash by couples desperate to start a familymaking them vulnerable to fall victim to misinformation and unnecessary add-on procedures. Researchers in Barcelona discovered that intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), which is routinely sold to families undergoing IVF treatment as an expensive add-on, actually reduced success rates by 55 percent as compared to standard IVF treatment [6].

I know from my own personal experience; the IVF process can be overwhelming and confusing not only emotionally but financially. The IVF Talks aims to educate all people on navigating the IVF process and bring forward the experts from different arenas of the IVF process. These are doctors most patients arent privy too during their routine infertility care. said Adam Bloch, co-organizer of The IVF Talks.

The IVF Talks is tackling unspoken issues of the IVF Industry head on and galvanizing all white-hat doctors and clinics in the movement to inform and empower with education, he continued. Were bringing the conversation forward, out of the shadows, with trusted industry expert advice across every aspect of the IVF process.

The IVF Talks will be held at the Aratani Theatre in Los Angeles on February 9, 2020. Buy tickets here.

About The IVF Talks The IVF Talks event is a unique, first of its kind, user-focused experience that empowers couples with expert information to tackle misinformation and other struggles throughout the Infertility journey. The Talks Company LLC, DBA The IVF Talks was established in May 2019 by Rozanne Sher and Adam Bloch to deliver state-of-the-art events centered around delivering Infertility information to the masses. Visit http://www.theivftalks.com

1.National Center for Health Statistics, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, July 15, 2016 2.Family Builder Workplace Index, The Fertility IQ, 2017-2018 3.Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report, Center for Disease Control, October 2017 4. The Psychological impact of infertility and its treatment, Harvard Medical School, May 2009 5.Coverage for fertility treatments often comes up short, CNBC, June 30, 2019 6.IVF Add-on sold to desperate couples may lower chances of having a baby by a third, study says, The Independent June 26, 2019

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