Free FIT tests offered for National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month – The Robesonian

Posted: March 7, 2020 at 3:43 pm


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March 07, 2020

LUMBERTON A local health-care leader recently was elected president of the Sandhills Healthcare Executives Forum.

Jason Cox, Southeastern Health vice president and Southeastern Regional Medical Center chief operating officer, will serve a two-year term in his position with the forum, which is the local chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives and encompasses a 13-county region.

Im excited by the opportunity to serve as president of the Sandhills Healthcare Executives Forum for the next two years, Cox said. Im also humbled by the opportunity to serve the regions health-care executives in their professional growth and development.

Cox joined Southeastern Health in 2016. He received a masters degree in Public Administration from Bowie State University and a masters degree in Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Before coming to Southeastern Health, he served in management roles in health care for 14 years and spent several years in the United States military.

Cox

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_Cox.jpgCox

March 07, 2020

LUMBERTON Southeastern Healths chief Nursing officer recently received the American College of Healthcare Executives Senior-Level Healthcare Executive Regents Award.

The award was presented to Renae Taylor on Feb. 19 at the North Carolina Healthcare Associations Winter Meeting in Raleigh.

The award recognizes ACHE members who are experienced in the field and have made significant contributions to the advancement of health-care management excellence and the achievement of ACHEs goals.

Members are evaluated on leadership ability, innovative and creative management, executive capability in developing their own organization and promoting its growth in stature in the community, contributions to the development of others in the health-care profession, leadership in state, local or provincial hospital and health association activities, participation in civic/community activities and projects, participation in ACHE activities, and interest in assisting ACHE in achieving its objectives.

A native of Bladenboro, Taylor received an associate degree in Nursing from Robeson Community College in 1991 and a bachelors degree in Nursing from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in 2008. She received a masters degree in Health-Care Administration from Independence University in 2012 and is certified as a critical care registered nurse. Before stepping into her current role in 2013, Taylor served as director of critical care services and as unit manager of the intensive care unit. She is an ACHE fellow and also holds a Nurse Executive-Advanced Certification.

The American College of Healthcare Executives is an international professional society of more than 48,000 health-care executives who lead hospitals, health-care systems, and other health-care organizations. The societys mission is to advance its members and health-care management excellence. The American College of Healthcare Executives offers its prestigious FACHE credential, signifying board certification in health care management. For more information, visit http://www.ache.org.

Renae Taylor is presented the Regents Award by Southeastern Health Vice President and SRMC COO Jason Cox, left, and NC Regent and FirstHealth Moore Regional Hospital COO Brian Canfield.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_Award.jpgRenae Taylor is presented the Regents Award by Southeastern Health Vice President and SRMC COO Jason Cox, left, and NC Regent and FirstHealth Moore Regional Hospital COO Brian Canfield.

March 07, 2020

At the monthly Robeson County Board of Health meeting on Feb. 27, Tillie Clark, regional state dental hygienist, provided CDC Water Fluoridation Quality awards to the townof Fairmont and the city of Lumberton. Accepting the awards for Fairmont were Town Manager Katrina Tatum and Water Department employees Ronnie Seals and Kevin Taylor. Accepting for Lumberton was Corey Walters, assistant Public Works director.

As Clark noted, fluoridation is considered one of the 10 great public health achievements in the 20th century in the United States and we are a fortunate community to have it provided in most areas.

So what else is in the top 10 list? The others are vaccinations, motor vehicle safety, recognition of tobacco use as a hazard, family planning, healthier mothers and babies, safer and healthier foods, control of infectious diseases, safer workplaces and decline in deaths from coronary heart disease and stroke. It is safe to say that all of these are still works in progress in the 21st century.

The importance of these awards being handed out at the board meeting was that last year Robeson County was faced with the prospect of not adding fluoridation to the water because of chemical and equipment issues. Like many other places, the equipment goes back 50-plus years in fact fluoridation has been occurring for 75 years so repairs are not an option. The Health Board had been approached about providing a resolution to discontinue fluoridating, as this was required before any action could be taken by the county. An alternative plan was developed, but this decision was not required and fluoridation continues. Needless to say, it would be very difficult for a board whose sole consideration is public health to advocate for the removal of one of the great accomplishments.

What has changed over the years is the amount of fluoride that is available through toothpaste. However, community water fluoridation remains the most efficient and cost-effective way to deliver fluoride to everyone in a community irrespective of their age, income or education. The goal is to prevent cavities and there has been a 25% reduction of this condition because of fluoridation.

Like everything else, there is an anti-group that opposes this healthful addition. Their argument revolves around fluorosis (white or dark spots on the teeth because of overexposure of chemical), excessive intake (most children use too much toothpaste so this exacerbates the problem), violates informed consent, doesnt prevent 100% of cavities, health concerns in various tissues, misinformation spread through the internet and it is counter to holistic health. Recognizing those concerns, nearly all public health, medical and dental organizations recommend water fluoridation. Those entities still providing it in Robeson County are applauded for doing so.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_Smith-bill-1.jpg

Fairmont Water Department employee Kevin Taylor, left, Town Manager Katrina Tatum and Water Department employee Ronnie Seals, right, accept a CDC Water Fluoridation Quality Award from Tillie Clark, regional state dental hygienist.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_Smith-Fairmont.jpgFairmont Water Department employee Kevin Taylor, left, Town Manager Katrina Tatum and Water Department employee Ronnie Seals, right, accept a CDC Water Fluoridation Quality Award from Tillie Clark, regional state dental hygienist.

Corey Walters, assistant director of Lumbertons Public Works Department, accepts a CDC Water Fluoridation Quality Award from Tillie Clark, regional state dental hygienist.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_Smith-Lumberton.jpgCorey Walters, assistant director of Lumbertons Public Works Department, accepts a CDC Water Fluoridation Quality Award from Tillie Clark, regional state dental hygienist.

February 29, 2020

LUMBERTON Two Southeastern Health employees walked away from the companys annual service awards banquet on Tuesday with top honors.

Health Lab Analyst I Heather McQueen was named the 2019 winner of the John D. Drake Distinguished Service Award, Southeastern Healths highest employee honor, during the event in Southeastern Regional Medical Centers cafeteria. and SeHealth Chief Process Design Officer Steve Elgin was named the 2019 winner of the W. Reid Caldwell Jr. Distinguished Leadership Award.

Heather is well-known and respected throughout the organization and community for her compassion, enthusiasm, and energy, said Southeastern Health President/CEO Joann Anderson, who made the surprise presentations. Her combination of high ethical standards and vast experience enables her to be an excellent mentor to other employees.

McQueen, who has been with Southeastern Health for 18 years, is the 33rd person to be named winner of the Drake Award, which was established by the Southeastern Health board of trustees in 1988 to recognize exceptional service by employees. The Drake award was named in honor of the late John D. Drake, who retired as head cook in 1984 after 38 years of service.

To qualify for the Drake award, a Southeastern Health employee must demonstrate high standards for personal performance on the job, loyalty and dedication to the organization, an excellent attendance record, respect by fellow workers, leadership skills, and a caring attitude to fellow employees and guests of the organization.

To qualify for the Caldwell award, a Southeastern Health leader must serve at the director level or higher with five or more years of service and must exemplify the fulfillment of the mission, vision, values and standards of behavior of the organization while serving as a mentor to other leaders, removing barriers and contributing to a learning and advancing organization.

Steves leadership has been described as professionally relentless as he is consistently focused on helping Southeastern and its patients achieve the best outcomes possible in the most effective and efficient manner, Anderson said during the presentation.

The Caldwell award was established in June 2016 in honor of Southeastern Health Government Affairs Officer Reid Caldwell. Since joining the organization in 1981 as a vice president, he has led by example by exhibiting integrity, honesty and ethical behavior throughout his career.

McQueen and Elgin were awarded a framed certificate and an engraved watch as part of their respective awards. Their names also will be added to plaques that are permanently displayed in SRMCs main corridor.

McQueen lives in Whiteville with her husband, Aaron, and their two children, Gabriel and Noah.

Elgin, originally from Grundy, Va., lives in Florence, S.C., with his wife, Tebie, and their three children, Savannah, Stephen and Heather.

Previous winners of the Drake award were: 1988, Julia Harris; 1989, Addie Mae Caple; 1990, Beatrice Leggett and Vashti Pittman; 1991, Thelma Jean Reeves; 1992, Paula McLean; 1993, Shirley Thompson; 1994, Sonya Oxendine; 1995, Terry Carter; 1996, Vera McDowell; 1997, Jimmy Page; 1998, James E. Jones; 1999, JoAnn Falls and Myrtle Oxendine; 2000, Patricia Davis; 2001, Sherri Hayes; 2002, Doris Madden; 2003, Mary Catherine Buie; 2004, Noel Bounds; 2005, Cynthia George; 2006, Rhonda Carter; 2007, Anne Marie Hendren; 2008, Myrtle Wilcox; 2009, Audrey Cox; 2010, Bryan Hilbourn; 2011, Merry Hardin; 2012, Gerard McRae; 2014, Jeff Edge; 2015, Lisa A. Hunt; 2016, Lori Corbett; 2017, Jeanine Lawson; and 2018, Phillip Knecht.

Previous winners of the Caldwell award were Elizabeth Kirschling, 2016; Cynthia George, 2017; and Jonathan Everson, 2018.

Heather McQueen, right, is pictured after the Drake Award presentation with Southeastern Health President/CEO Joann Anderson.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_SeHealth-McQueen.jpgHeather McQueen, right, is pictured after the Drake Award presentation with Southeastern Health President/CEO Joann Anderson.

Steve Elgin, right, is pictured after the Caldwell Award presentation with Southeastern Health President/CEO Joann Anderson.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_SeHealth-Elgin.jpgSteve Elgin, right, is pictured after the Caldwell Award presentation with Southeastern Health President/CEO Joann Anderson.

February 29, 2020

LUMBERTON Because March is National Nutrition Month, Southeastern Regional Medical Centers Maternal Child Health unit is reminding the public that the best nutrition for babies is found through breastfeeding.

Southeastern Health is part of the Enrich Carolinas Breastfeeding Initiative, which aims to improve maternity care and breastfeeding rates in underserved communities in the Carolinas. As part of that initiative, most of SRMCs Maternal Child Health nurses have completed 20 hours of didactic online coursework through the University of Virginia and five hours of clinical time with international board-certified lactation consultants to further develop their breastfeeding education skills. All of the units nurses are expected to complete the training by April 30. Also, all of the Maternal Child Health providers will complete three hours of online education.

This training will help us to better sever the nutritional needs of the smallest members of our community, said Matilda Cooper, Maternal Child Health manager. Not only are we providing women with breastfeeding support during their hospital stay, we are also working to educate women before their babies are born about the benefits of breastfeeding and how to receive support to breastfeed successfully through breastfeeding classes with expectant moms.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be exclusively breastfed for at least the first six months with continued appropriate complementary foods for one year or longer. According to the Center for Disease Control and Preventions 2018 Breastfeeding Report Card, only 27% of infants in North Carolina are exclusively breastfeeding through six months.

Southeastern Health reminds mothers that the best nutrition for babies is found through breastfeeding. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be exclusively breastfed for at least the first six months.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_SeHealth-Maternal.jpgSoutheastern Health reminds mothers that the best nutrition for babies is found through breastfeeding. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be exclusively breastfed for at least the first six months.

February 29, 2020

LUMBERTON One hundred and one employees were honored Tuesday at Southeastern Healths annual service awards banquet.

SeHealths administrators presented service pins during the after-dinner ceremony held in Southeastern Regional Medical Centers dining room. Those in attendance made dinner selections from a variety of delicious entrees prepared by SeHealths Food and Nutrition Services staff. Entertainment was provided by Musician Michael Hulett.

Employees celebrating a five-year anniversary milestone of 15 or more years were honored at the ceremony by receiving service pins. More than 2,200 employees work on Southeasterns main campus and affiliated agencies.

Henry L. Stephens was recognized for 45 years of service.

Honored for 40 years of service were: Rhonda L. Carter; Anna M. Cooke; Lucinda H. Locklear; and Catherine Smith.

Receiving 35 year pins were: Deborah L. Ayers; Bonnie; Fay M. Blanks; Tina L. Bullard; Tammy M. Coleman; Anna M. Hammonds; Thomas V. Pratt; and Teresa C. Vanderford.

Recognized for 30 years of service were: Gwendolyn G. Blue; Ramona Bradley; Joshua B. Buie; Lora M. Dietrich; Linda M. Gerald; Laura Sissy Grantham; Diane H. Liles; Regina O. McGirt; Melanie G. McKee; Ethel M. Piggott; Sheila Slaughter; Tronda B. Sturdivant; Leslie W. Tyner; and Shelia F. Williams.

Honored for 25 years of service were: Julie R. Atkinson; Cheryl A. Chavis; Christine E. Eason; Deborah A. Fagan; Ardie M. Gilchrist; Kenneth B. Hilbourn; Phyllis Jacobs; Donna B. Kinlaw; John McKoy; and Joyce D. Slate.

Recognized with 20 year pins were: Susan G. Bass; Michelle M. Blair; Doris L. Britt; Sharon D. Campbell; Sandra K. Chavis; Murrell L. Dockery; Aundrea R. Emanuel, FNP; Carolyn R. Graham; Miranda I. Graham; Chris C. Guess; Billy C. Hammonds; Mary E. Ivey; Don R. Jacobs; Teresa S. Jones; Cassandra King; Cathlene Locklear; Jeffery Locklear; Kimberly Locklear; Ruth J. McAlister; Emily D. Parnell; Elaine L. Pate; Marilyn R. Reaves; Phillip W. Richardson; Christy P. Rogers; Mark Ross; Sudie B. Smith; Pamela S. Ward; and Judy L. Williams.

Honored for 15 years of service were: Jennifer R. Altman; Katie R. Atkinson; Annette D. Baxley; Karen D. Blackmon; Meredith G. Britt; Tammy L. Bullard; Anthony M. Cabatu; Lorna A. Clothier; Lamont Collins; Sabine M. Cox; Dianne L. Cummings; Rebecca S. Davis; Karen L. Dent ; Vonda W. Edwards; Lavonda S. Foley; Bruce A. Gilliard; Roderick S. Graham; Mildred E. Hammond; Patrick K. Hester; Sonja R. Hilburn; Nancy W. Huggins; Wendy R. Hunt; Carrie E. Jacobs; Garry Johnson; Richard L. Jones; Jeffery H. Labbe; Tammy R. Locklear; Yvonne O. Locklear; Virginia J. Lowery; Glenda M. Monroe; Donna L. Odum; Jane A. Pitman; Lisa M. Rozier; Dr. Dennis O. Stuart; Rachel L. Vasquez; and Myra P. Williams

Henry L. Stephens, of St. Pauls, was recognized by SeHealth President and CEO Joann Anderson for 45 years of service.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_Honors.jpgHenry L. Stephens, of St. Pauls, was recognized by SeHealth President and CEO Joann Anderson for 45 years of service.

February 22, 2020

LUMBERTON Southeastern Radiology Associates has received reaccreditation from the American College of Radiology in computed tomography scan for adult and pediatric patients, and achieved ACRs designation as an ACR Lung Cancer Screening Center.

We are very blessed to have leadership and staff who strive to make this and other accreditations possible here at Southeastern Health, said Jeff Inman, Southeastern Healths Technical Operations supervisor. Our community will be better served knowing they are getting the best in imaging standards.

The accreditations, which last for three years, were given after the computed tomography services of Southeastern Radiology Associates were surveyed by the American College of Radiologys Committee on Computed Tomography Accreditation of the Commission on Quality and Safety.

Southeastern Radiology Associates is located at 209 W. 27th St. in Lumberton.

Southeastern Radiology Associates recently received reaccreditation from the American College of Radiology in computed tomography scan.

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_Radiology-pix.jpgSoutheastern Radiology Associates recently received reaccreditation from the American College of Radiology in computed tomography scan.

February 22, 2020

This past week at Hard Road CrossFit, my coach had us working on handstand skills. For most people this is not too exciting but for me it was a big deal.

As athletic as I am, gymnastic skills have always frustrated me. I cannot really even do a somersault without having to sit five minutes to get over being dizzy. Because of this, I have avoided the handstand portion of CrossFit for four years now. This past week, however, I decided as I am not getting any younger it was time to master at least one gymnastic skill. I am proud to say that at approximately 6:15 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 17, I did my first-ever handstand at the age of 56! I did it after class and off in a corner but as soon as I got up I heard cheers coming from all around the gym.

My daughter Nikki was grinning from ear-to-ear and my coach, David, gave me a hug. My fitness family had seen me conquer my fears and were there to support me. That, my friends, is why group fitness can be so special.

Here are some of the benefits of getting fitness on with your people:

Coaching: When you exercise together with other people around you, there will be a qualified fitness expert that will lead the whole group. They can answer questions, cheer you on and act as a personal trainer to modify your workout to make it the most beneficial.

More bang for your buck: Joining a gym that offers group exercise will give you more bang for your buck. You can enjoy many more fitness benefits when you are in the right group of people. You can encourage each other, have fun and hold each other accountable for making it to class. When you are going solo, it is easier to skip a workout and stay home because no one is expecting you.

Lower risk of injury: Having a group of people around you that have the same goals as you is very helpful and can decrease the risk of getting injured. This is because when you are doing a certain routine or a workout the wrong way, the folks that you are with during the exercise will help you correct your form and positioning. A coach or group leader can also keep an eye on you to make sure your form is correct.

Higher endorphin output: When you exercise in groups, you will feel lighter, happier, and calmer even after an intense workout session. Exercising in a group increases the production of your endorphins or happy hormones. This is a great opportunity to share a laugh and make new friends.

Camaraderie between participants: Group exercises are not only meant to provide you benefits on your fitness goals alone, but they are pretty great for building your social life. You can meet a lot of people and gain new friends! And when this happens, youll be more excited every time your group is scheduled for a class.

So whether its CrossFit, Zumba, Spin or even a Running Club, exercising with other people can be a great way to keep your fitness routine fresh and develop some lifelong friendships. And who knows, for those of us single folks, we just might meet someone special who shares our love for fitness!

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February 21, 2020

LUMBERTON Residents who are 55 years and older are being offered the chance to discuss health issues that affect them with people who can make a difference in the community.

The Healthy Robeson Community Conversations event is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. March 24 at St. Joseph MRC Solid Rock Church in Red Springs.

Ongoing conversations like these guide Healthy Robeson to focus its efforts on topics that are most relevant to the community. St. Joseph MRC Solid Rock Church is located at 305 E. Sixth St. in Red Springs. Breakfast will be served.

People interested in attending need to call Community Health Services intern Jada Walker at 910-671-5000, Ext. 7410, by March 16.

February 15, 2020

LUMBERTON Physicians at Southeastern Regional Medical Center have elected new officers to lead the medical staff.

Chosen to serve a two-year term that started in January were Dr. Robin Peace, president; Dr. Eric Breitbart, president-elect; and Dr. Kailash Chandwani, secretary/treasurer. Dr. Dennis Stuart is immediate past president.

Dr. Vanesh Khetpal and Breitbart will serve two-year terms as chairs of the departments of medicine and surgery, respectively.

Peace, a family practitioner who is a native of Granville County, has been practicing in Robeson County for 21 years, and with Southeastern Health since 2015 at the Southeastern Medical Clinic North Lumberton. She is also a medical provider for Southeastern Hospice. A graduate of East Carolina University School of Medicine, she completed her residency at Pitt Memorial Hospital in Greenville in 1998. Before joining Southeastern Health full-time, Peace practiced with Robeson Health Care Corporation for 17 years, serving as chief medical officer for 11 of those years. During that time, she also served as a hospitalist with Southeastern Regional Medical Center. She is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine and the American Academy of HIV Medicine.

I was honored to be asked to serve as medical staff president, Peace said. I look forward to representing Southeastern Health and the medical staff.

Breitbart is an orthopedic surgeon who has specialized in sports medicine at Southeastern Healths Southeastern Orthopedics since 2015. A native of New Jersey, Breitbart received a medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Newark in May 2009. He completed an orthopedic residency at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in June 2014 and a fellowship in sports medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia in July 2015. He received specialized training in both adult sports medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and pediatric sports medicine through the Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia.

Chandwani is an interventional pain physician who joined Southeastern Spine and Pain Clinic in 2013. He received his medical degree from Sindh Medical College in Pakistan in 2001 and completed a residency in anesthesiology at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock in 2009. He also completed a fellowship in interventional pain management at University Hospitals, Case Medical Center in Cleveland in 2010. He is certified by the American Board of Anesthesiology.

Peace

https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_SREMC-Peace.jpgPeace

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Free FIT tests offered for National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month - The Robesonian

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