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Archive for the ‘Thai Chi’ Category

4 Thais among Forbes Asia's 48 Heroes of Philanthropy

Posted: June 21, 2012 at 1:24 pm


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Home business 4 Thais among Forbes Asia's 48 Heroes of Philanthropy

Philanthropy

The Nation June 21, 2012 3:12 pm

Released today, Boonchai, founder of Cellphone Network and Total Access Communication, was honoured for his devotion in supporting education and culture since selling control of the company in 2005. This year, he plans to open the Thai Contemporary Art Museum in Bangkok, an US$8.4 million showcase for his collection of modern Thai painting, sculpture and miniatures that will be the nations largest privately funded museum.

Tan pledges half his net profit to his Tan Pan Foundation, which works to improve education, the environment and tourism. Gave $67,000 from his TV appearances with a standup comic for new buildings at Bor Thong Kindergarten in Chon Buri, his hometown. He also contributed to Japanese earthquake relief and raised more money via his restaurants and Facebook fan page for a total of $143,000.

Bilaibhan, chairperson of the family-owned Nai Lert Park Hotel, is helping lead efforts to conserve the nations fast-disappearing architectural heritage as president of the Siam Society. She also serves as president of a Thai fund involved in protecting wild elephants. Runs the Lert Sin Foundation, which supports health care and education and is funded from the legacy of her grandfather, who built real estate, retailing and transport businesses.

Thongma, CEO of Pruksa Real Estate, donated some $660,000 to hospitals, Buddhist organisations and schools in 2010 and 2011. A civil engineer by training, hes channeled most of his education-related giving into the engineering field.

Forbes Asia enlisted 48 most remarkable givers from across Asia Pacific. From each of 12 jurisdictions, four are selected for their mark in philanthropy in innovative ways.

"The selections are subjective and we aimed for a mix of notable people and causes. We also try to identify new philanthropists each year and pick only true philanthropists who are giving their own money. If highlighting these 48 generous souls encourages more people to support worthy causes, then we will deem our project a big success," said John Koppisch, Senior Editor, Forbes Asia.

Education for the poor remains a strong theme for many of the philanthropists.

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4 Thais among Forbes Asia's 48 Heroes of Philanthropy

Written by simmons

June 21st, 2012 at 1:24 pm

Posted in Thai Chi

Pattaya Mail

Posted: June 18, 2012 at 11:23 am


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BANGKOK, June 18- Vietnams Vice President Nguyen Thi Doan will officially visit Thailand on June 20-24 to strengthen bilateral ties between the two countries, according to Thailands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Madame Doan, as a guest of the Thai government, is scheduled to meet with Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra on Friday.

The meeting is intended as an opportunity exchange ideas and views to further bilateral relations, cooperation and development as well as to foster strategic partnership in terms of politics, economies, society, culture and education.

During her official trip to the kingdom, the vice president of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam will travel to Thailands northeastern provinces of Nakhon Phanom and Khon Kaen, where there are historical connections between Thailand and Indochina, and will meet with provincial governors.

In addition, Madame Doan is set to visit the Thai-Vietnamese Friendship Village and meet with the large Vietnamese community in Nakhon Phanom where Ho Chi Minh, father and first president of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) from 1945 to 1969 and an iconic leader of the post-World War II anti-colonial movement in Asia.

Affectionately known to Vietnamese as Bac (Uncle) Ho, the Vietnamese independence leader visited Bangkok and lived in Nakhon Phanom in the late 1920s.

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Pattaya Mail

Written by simmons

June 18th, 2012 at 11:23 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Index Creative Village spreads overseas

Posted: June 12, 2012 at 4:19 am


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WATCHIRANONT THONGTEP June 12, 2012 1:00 am

Based in the commercial capital Ho Chi Minh City, TVMIndex - a 50:50 JV - will provide international-standard event-organising services, multimedia production and sponsorship management for multinational companies and local enterprises, as well as for Thai companies operating in Vietnam.

The JV is expected to generate revenue of Bt70 million this year, with multinational and local companies accounting for 60 per cent of the total.

Index Creative Village co-chief executive officer Kriangkan Kanjanapokin yesterday said the company had confidence in the strength of the Vietnamese economy, and the country's population of more than 80 million presented a sizeable market.

Meanwhile, international conglomerates, including major Thai companies in the automobile and beverage industries, were continuing to invest and expand their business in the country to cash in on the advantages of the Asean Economic Community, which will be implemented in 2015.

Kriangkan added that in the first phase, the JV would focus on Ho Chi Minh City-based companies as well as government bodies. TVMIndex currently has 13 staff.

Le Thi Phuong Thuy, chairwoman of Tri Viet Media, said that through the partnership, the company would like to see know-how, creativity and innovation transfer from a highly experienced Thai event organiser to strengthen its core competency.

Index Creative Village next month plans to announce a second Asean joint venture, in Myanmar, after having organised several events for the government early this year, Kriangkan said.

The company will then discuss further expansion in the Middle East with its Dubai-based JV, Aspan Index Events, while negotiating with several media companies in Indonesia about setting foot in Asean's largest and most populous country.

"With these efforts, the company expects to gain at least Bt196 million in revenue from overseas business within five years," he added.

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Index Creative Village spreads overseas

Written by simmons

June 12th, 2012 at 4:19 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Travel: Five great free things you can do in Bangkok

Posted: June 9, 2012 at 12:14 am


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BANGKOK Chaos is part of Bangkoks charm.

But the savvy traveller quickly learns how to navigate Bangkoks legendary traffic jams and discover its soul, a mix of urban jungle and Buddhist serenity where shopping and eating are national pastimes.

Despite the weak U.S. dollar, Bangkok remains one of the best deals in Asia. Some of the worlds tastiest street food sells for as little as 25 baht (80 cents) a plate. Beat traffic by zipping down side streets in a tuk-tuk or cruising up the Chao Praya on public express boats for stunning views of the citys premier attractions both for about a dollar. Other favourite outings are free:

Lumpini Park: An oasis of tropical gardens and paved jogging paths in the middle of the city. Beat the heat by avoiding the park in midday. There are early morning tai chi classes and after work aerobics classes. You can rent paddle boats, take the kids to one of Bangkoks best outdoor playgrounds or marvel at the massive monitor lizards in the lake.

Chatuchak Market: Browsing is free at the largest outdoor market in Thailand, and its a sight to see whether or not you take something home. Chatuchaks thousands of stalls are divided into sections that include antiques, home decor, clothing and food. You can find everything from Buddha statues and Thai handicrafts to handmade jewelry and the occasional endangered species in the live animal section. For upscale, air-conditioned window shopping, head to shopping malls Siam Paragon, Emporium or Central World.

Temple hopping: Catch some karma at Bangkoks many Buddhist temples, known in Thai as wats. Some of the most popular, Wat Po and Wat Arun, ask foreigners to pay a minimal entrance fee but hundreds of others are free, including the impressive Temple of the Golden Mount, also known as Wat Saket. A temple compounds shaded walkways and quiet corners are a perfect place to escape the sensory overload on Bangkoks busy streets.

Flower market: Bangkoks largest flower market, Pak Klong Talat, is open 24 hours but its busiest just after 2 a.m. when traders unload their fresh-cut blossoms in bulk. Its a kaleidoscope of colours with an incredible selection of orchids at jaw-droppingly cheap prices. The market is just south of Wat Pho and not far from the Grand Palace in the historical section of old Bangkok.

Patpong Road: For a walk on Bangkoks wild side, take an evening stroll along Patpong Road. It offers the incongruous mix of go-go bars and evening shopping. A thriving night market selling T-shirts, pirated DVDs and other souvenirs runs through the red-light district and spills onto the adjacent Silom Road, which is packed with street food vendors, restaurants and bars.

Have your say

Do you know a great free thing to see or do in Waterloo Region or Wellington County? Write by email to reporter Barbara Aggerholm at baggerholm@therecord.com. Later this summer, shell report back on your suggestions.

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Travel: Five great free things you can do in Bangkok

Written by simmons

June 9th, 2012 at 12:14 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Flowers talking

Posted: at 12:14 am


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A truck driver waits for customers at the Ho Thi Ky flower market

Located in a shallow alley off Ly Thai To Street, Ho Thi KyFlower Marketis one of the biggest flower markets inHo Chi Minh City.

Entering the market in early morning, I was amazed by the sight of roses, lotuses, lilies, daisies and orchids being unloaded from trucks and motorbikes from all over Vietnam and beyond. I was overwhelmed by the pleasant fragrances of hundreds of varieties of fresh cut flowers dominating the air, which gave the place the feeling of eternal springtime.

A few hours later, I returned, but was unbothered by the summer heat of high noon, cooled by the good energy of people shopping for flowers, whose minds I could only assume were full of pleasant thoughts. Despite the heat, I found the atmosphere relaxed with shopkeepers who were happily willing to let me taking photos and interview them.

Flower trading is a tough job. The markets shops open early and many do not close until after midnight, most of the shopkeepers working long hours both during the week and on weekends.

But, just like flowers they sell, there is something tender, gentle, natural and polite about these shop attendants, who spend a large chunk of their lives surrounded by the citys most beautiful flowers.

Bundles of flowers for sale at the Ho Thi Ky flower market

When I was born, the flower market was already here. Our shop offers orchids from gardens in Hoc Mon, Cu Chi, Long An, Da Lat and Thailand. Prices change a bit everyday, said Duong Thi Kim Thoa, 20, a shopkeeper at a small flower stall at Ho Thi Ky.

Thoa said because it was one day before first day of a new lunar month, prices were higher.

Whereas buying fresh flowers on a regular basis is more common in northern Vietnam, in HCMC most fresh flowers end up decorating events such as weddings and funerals.

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Flowers talking

Written by simmons

June 9th, 2012 at 12:14 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Columbia Asia opens new hospital in Vietnam

Posted: June 8, 2012 at 3:17 am


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MALAYSIA-based international healthcare provider Columbia Asia has opened a new hospital in Binh Duong, Vietnam, which is the group's 22nd hospital in the region.

The services provider said Columbia Hospital in Binh Duong is its third facility in Vietnam after the one in Gia Dinh, Ho Chi Minh City.

The group also has an international clinic in District One, Ho Chi Minh City.

"Binh Duong has an increasing population and so we are here to meet the demand for quality healthcare now and in the future," Columbia Hospital-Binh Duong general director Dr Thai Tuong Tuong said in a statement.

The company, which is 30 per cent owned by the Employee Provident Fund and 70 per cent by a US-based International Columbia USA LLC, is developing two more hospitals, in Petaling Jaya and Klang.

Its operations in Vietnam are through 100 per cent foreign direct investment.

Columbia Asia Sdn Bhd (Southeast Asia) chief executive officer Kelvin Tan said Columbia Hospital-Binh Duong follows the Columbia Asia business model that focuses on medical excellence and caring patient services.

"This community hospital is built smaller than the standard private hospital, allowing it to provide private healthcare at affordable rates while helping to ease patient flow and operate more efficiently," he said.

The hospital has a capacity of 100 beds, with a total of 34 medical consultants. It is equipped with three operating rooms, a 10-cot nursery, four delivery suites and seven emergency bays. On top of that, it offers ambulatory, dialysis, endoscopy and physiotherapy services.

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Columbia Asia opens new hospital in Vietnam

Written by simmons

June 8th, 2012 at 3:17 am

Posted in Thai Chi

SHOOTING / SEASA CHAMPIONSHIPS: Hafiz guns down Sea Games champ

Posted: June 7, 2012 at 11:17 am


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Hafiz Adzha won the 25m rapid fire individual title yesterday. Pic by Goh Thean Howe

Hafiz edged reigning Sea Games champion Ha Minh Thanh of Vietnam 25-24 in the shoot-off in the final for the individual title while Macaus Chio Hong Chi took bronze.

Compatriot Hazli Izwan Amir Hasan had actually finished third but competition rules specify that one country can only earn one medal in each event.

Hafiz, together with Hazli and Khalel Abdullah, posted a combined 1,727 total to win the team gold followed by Vietnam (1,705) and Macau (1,588).

The victory over the Sea Games champion today (yesterday) gives me a huge boost ahead of next years Myanmar edition. Minh Thanh gave me anxious moments as he kept on putting the pressure on me, said Hafiz, who finished at last years Indonesia Sea Games, yesterday.

However, he cracked under pressure and I won the title by one shot. Vietnam protested but the jury, upon checking the targets, did not change the result.

Wishu Awaluddin then followed up with wins in the junior and team events.

RESULTS (Malaysia unless stated) Men's 25m rapid fire pistol individual: 1 Hafiz Adzha, 2 Ha Minh Tranh (Vie), 3 Chio Hong Chi (Mac); Team: 1 Malaysia 1,729, 2 Vietnam 1,705, 3 Macau 1,588.

Juniors 25m rapid fire pistol individual: 1 Mohd Wisnu Awaluddinn 558, 2 Lu My Long (Vie) 542; Team: 1 Malaysia 1,542, 2 Vietnam 1,615.

50m rifle prone individual: 1 Lin Aung (Mya) 694.7, 2 Phung Le Huyen (Vie) 689.2, 3 Mohd Shahril Sahak 687.8; Team: 1 Myanmar 1,759, 2 Vietnam 1,756,

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SHOOTING / SEASA CHAMPIONSHIPS: Hafiz guns down Sea Games champ

Written by simmons

June 7th, 2012 at 11:17 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Uncle Ho's legacy lives on in Vietnam

Posted: at 11:17 am


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6 June 2012 Last updated at 19:32 ET By Viv Marsh BBC News

On an overcast morning in Hanoi, the queue stretches several hundred metres. Women dressed in traditional ao dai; schoolchildren in uniform jostling one another; grim-faced old men standing in silence; a few self-conscious Western tourists.

They are all waiting to see Vietnam's figurehead and Communist revolutionary leader, Ho Chi Minh - even though he has been dead for 43 years.

For the visitor, the enduring image of Ho Chi Minh may be the one he never wanted - the long shuffle through security checks around his mausoleum, culminating in a few seconds' hushed walk past his embalmed body. He himself wished to be cremated.

What would have been the late president's 122nd birthday this year, on 19 May, was marked by an exhibition of Ho Chi Minh documents in the province of Thai Nguyen and the launch of a translated biography, endorsed by the ruling Communist Party, entitled Ho Chi Minh - an Immortal Saint.

The 16-chapter book chronicling the late president's life and career was written by Thai social activist Suprida Phanomjong, the son of a former Thai prime minister, who is said to have had close connections to Ho Chi Minh.

State website VietNam News said the author had been "touched to see how the Vietnamese people worshipped the president".

The book's Vietnamese-language launch - six years after it first appeared in Thai - was attended by a leading Vietnamese propaganda official, Nguyen An Tiem.

The state-backed Voice of Vietnam website said the publication was "expected to help raise public awareness of Ho Chi Minh Thought and his moral examples", thus contributing towards "studying and following Ho Chi Minh's Moral Example campaign".

"The fact that he lived a fairly abstemious life and that he was devoted to the cause of his country, all those things are meant to be virtues that all Communists share," says Sophie Quinn-Judge, a scholar and biographer of Ho Chi Minh.

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Uncle Ho's legacy lives on in Vietnam

Written by simmons

June 7th, 2012 at 11:17 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Tips for exploring Bangkok for free

Posted: June 3, 2012 at 1:16 pm


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BANGKOK Chaos is part of Bangkok's charm. But the savvy traveler quickly learns how to navigate Bangkok's legendary traffic jams and discover its soul, a mix of urban jungle and Buddhist serenity where shopping and eating are national pastimes.

Despite the weak dollar, Bangkok remains one of the best deals in Asia. Some of the world's tastiest street food sells for as little as 25 baht (80 cents) a plate. Beat traffic by zipping down side streets in a tuk-tuk or cruising up the Chao Phraya on public express boats for stunning views of the city's premier attractions both for about a dollar. Other favorite outings are free:

LUMPINI PARK: An oasis of tropical gardens and paved jogging paths in the middle of the city. Beat the heat by avoiding the park in midday. There are early-morning tai chi classes and after-work aerobics classes. You can rent paddle boats, take the kids to one of Bangkok's best outdoor playgrounds or marvel at the massive monitor lizards in the lake.

CHATUCHAK MARKET: Browsing is free at the largest outdoor market in Thailand, and it's a sight to see whether or not you take something home. Chatuchak's thousands of stalls are divided into sections that include antiques, home dcor, clothing and food. You can find everything from Buddha statues and Thai handicrafts to handmade jewelry and the occasional endangered species in the live animal section. For upscale, air-conditioned window shopping, head to shopping malls Siam Paragon, Emporium or Central World.

TEMPLE HOPPING: Catch some karma at Bangkok's many Buddhist temples, known in Thai as "wats." Some of the most popular, Wat Po and Wat Arun, ask foreigners to pay a minimal entrance fee but hundreds of others are free, including the impressive Temple of the Golden Mount, also known as Wat Saket. A temple compound's shaded walkways and quiet corners are a perfect place to escape the sensory overload on Bangkok's busy streets.

FLOWER MARKET: Bangkok's largest flower market, Pak Klong Talat, is open 24 hours but it's busiest just after 2 a.m. when traders unload their fresh-cut blossoms in bulk. It's a kaleidoscope of colors with an incredible selection of orchids at jaw-droppingly cheap prices. The market is just south of Wat Pho and not far from the Grand Palace in the historical section of old Bangkok.

PATPONG: For a walk on Bangkok's wild side, take an evening stroll along Patpong Road. It offers the incongruous mix of go-go bars and evening shopping. A thriving night market selling T-shirts, pirated DVDs and other souvenirs runs through the red-light district and spills onto the adjacent Silom Road, which is packed with street food vendors, restaurants and bars.

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Tips for exploring Bangkok for free

Written by simmons

June 3rd, 2012 at 1:16 pm

Posted in Thai Chi

Bangkok: 5 free things to do

Posted: May 28, 2012 at 1:21 pm


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BANGKOK Chaos is part of Bangkok's charm. But the savvy traveler quickly learns how to navigate Bangkok's legendary traffic jams and discover its soul, a mix of urban jungle and Buddhist serenity where shopping and eating are national pastimes.

Despite the weak dollar, Bangkok remains one of the best deals in Asia. Some of the world's tastiest street food sells for as little as 25 baht (80 cents) a plate. Beat traffic by zipping down side streets in a tuk-tuk or cruising up the Chao Praya on public express boats for stunning views of the city's premier attractions both for about a dollar. Other favorite outings are free:

LUMPINI PARK: An oasis of tropical gardens and paved jogging paths in the middle of the city. Beat the heat by avoiding the park in midday. There are early morning tai chi classes and after work aerobics classes. You can rent paddle boats, take the kids to one of Bangkok's best outdoor playgrounds or marvel at the massive monitor lizards in the lake.

CHATUCHAK MARKET: Browsing is free at the largest outdoor market in Thailand, and it's a sight to see whether or not you take something home. Chatuchak's thousands of stalls are divided into sections that include antiques, home dcor, clothing and food. You can find everything from Buddha statues and Thai handicrafts to handmade jewelry and the occasional endangered species in the live animal section. For upscale, air-conditioned window shopping, head to shopping malls Siam Paragon, Emporium or Central World.

TEMPLE HOPPING: Catch some karma at Bangkok's many Buddhist temples, known in Thai as "wats." Some of the most popular, Wat Po and Wat Arun, ask foreigners to pay a minimal entrance fee but hundreds of others are free, including the impressive Temple of the Golden Mount, also known as Wat Saket. A temple compound's shaded walkways and quiet corners are a perfect place to escape the sensory overload on Bangkok's busy streets.

FLOWER MARKET: Bangkok's largest flower market, Pak Klong Talat, is open 24 hours but it's busiest just after 2 a.m. when traders unload their fresh-cut blossoms in bulk. It's a kaleidoscope of colors with an incredible selection of orchids at jaw-droppingly cheap prices. The market is just south of Wat Pho and not far from the Grand Palace in the historical section of old Bangkok.

PATPONG: For a walk on Bangkok's wild side, take an evening stroll along Patpong Road. It offers the incongruous mix of go-go bars and evening shopping. A thriving night market selling T-shirts, pirated DVDs and other souvenirs runs through the red-light district and spills onto the adjacent Silom Road, which is packed with street food vendors, restaurants and bars.

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Bangkok: 5 free things to do

Written by simmons

May 28th, 2012 at 1:21 pm

Posted in Thai Chi


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