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Archive for the ‘Thai Chi’ Category

Columbia Asia opens new hospital in Vietnam

Posted: June 8, 2012 at 3:17 am


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MALAYSIA-based international healthcare provider Columbia Asia has opened a new hospital in Binh Duong, Vietnam, which is the group's 22nd hospital in the region.

The services provider said Columbia Hospital in Binh Duong is its third facility in Vietnam after the one in Gia Dinh, Ho Chi Minh City.

The group also has an international clinic in District One, Ho Chi Minh City.

"Binh Duong has an increasing population and so we are here to meet the demand for quality healthcare now and in the future," Columbia Hospital-Binh Duong general director Dr Thai Tuong Tuong said in a statement.

The company, which is 30 per cent owned by the Employee Provident Fund and 70 per cent by a US-based International Columbia USA LLC, is developing two more hospitals, in Petaling Jaya and Klang.

Its operations in Vietnam are through 100 per cent foreign direct investment.

Columbia Asia Sdn Bhd (Southeast Asia) chief executive officer Kelvin Tan said Columbia Hospital-Binh Duong follows the Columbia Asia business model that focuses on medical excellence and caring patient services.

"This community hospital is built smaller than the standard private hospital, allowing it to provide private healthcare at affordable rates while helping to ease patient flow and operate more efficiently," he said.

The hospital has a capacity of 100 beds, with a total of 34 medical consultants. It is equipped with three operating rooms, a 10-cot nursery, four delivery suites and seven emergency bays. On top of that, it offers ambulatory, dialysis, endoscopy and physiotherapy services.

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Columbia Asia opens new hospital in Vietnam

Written by simmons

June 8th, 2012 at 3:17 am

Posted in Thai Chi

SHOOTING / SEASA CHAMPIONSHIPS: Hafiz guns down Sea Games champ

Posted: June 7, 2012 at 11:17 am


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Hafiz Adzha won the 25m rapid fire individual title yesterday. Pic by Goh Thean Howe

Hafiz edged reigning Sea Games champion Ha Minh Thanh of Vietnam 25-24 in the shoot-off in the final for the individual title while Macaus Chio Hong Chi took bronze.

Compatriot Hazli Izwan Amir Hasan had actually finished third but competition rules specify that one country can only earn one medal in each event.

Hafiz, together with Hazli and Khalel Abdullah, posted a combined 1,727 total to win the team gold followed by Vietnam (1,705) and Macau (1,588).

The victory over the Sea Games champion today (yesterday) gives me a huge boost ahead of next years Myanmar edition. Minh Thanh gave me anxious moments as he kept on putting the pressure on me, said Hafiz, who finished at last years Indonesia Sea Games, yesterday.

However, he cracked under pressure and I won the title by one shot. Vietnam protested but the jury, upon checking the targets, did not change the result.

Wishu Awaluddin then followed up with wins in the junior and team events.

RESULTS (Malaysia unless stated) Men's 25m rapid fire pistol individual: 1 Hafiz Adzha, 2 Ha Minh Tranh (Vie), 3 Chio Hong Chi (Mac); Team: 1 Malaysia 1,729, 2 Vietnam 1,705, 3 Macau 1,588.

Juniors 25m rapid fire pistol individual: 1 Mohd Wisnu Awaluddinn 558, 2 Lu My Long (Vie) 542; Team: 1 Malaysia 1,542, 2 Vietnam 1,615.

50m rifle prone individual: 1 Lin Aung (Mya) 694.7, 2 Phung Le Huyen (Vie) 689.2, 3 Mohd Shahril Sahak 687.8; Team: 1 Myanmar 1,759, 2 Vietnam 1,756,

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SHOOTING / SEASA CHAMPIONSHIPS: Hafiz guns down Sea Games champ

Written by simmons

June 7th, 2012 at 11:17 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Uncle Ho's legacy lives on in Vietnam

Posted: at 11:17 am


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6 June 2012 Last updated at 19:32 ET By Viv Marsh BBC News

On an overcast morning in Hanoi, the queue stretches several hundred metres. Women dressed in traditional ao dai; schoolchildren in uniform jostling one another; grim-faced old men standing in silence; a few self-conscious Western tourists.

They are all waiting to see Vietnam's figurehead and Communist revolutionary leader, Ho Chi Minh - even though he has been dead for 43 years.

For the visitor, the enduring image of Ho Chi Minh may be the one he never wanted - the long shuffle through security checks around his mausoleum, culminating in a few seconds' hushed walk past his embalmed body. He himself wished to be cremated.

What would have been the late president's 122nd birthday this year, on 19 May, was marked by an exhibition of Ho Chi Minh documents in the province of Thai Nguyen and the launch of a translated biography, endorsed by the ruling Communist Party, entitled Ho Chi Minh - an Immortal Saint.

The 16-chapter book chronicling the late president's life and career was written by Thai social activist Suprida Phanomjong, the son of a former Thai prime minister, who is said to have had close connections to Ho Chi Minh.

State website VietNam News said the author had been "touched to see how the Vietnamese people worshipped the president".

The book's Vietnamese-language launch - six years after it first appeared in Thai - was attended by a leading Vietnamese propaganda official, Nguyen An Tiem.

The state-backed Voice of Vietnam website said the publication was "expected to help raise public awareness of Ho Chi Minh Thought and his moral examples", thus contributing towards "studying and following Ho Chi Minh's Moral Example campaign".

"The fact that he lived a fairly abstemious life and that he was devoted to the cause of his country, all those things are meant to be virtues that all Communists share," says Sophie Quinn-Judge, a scholar and biographer of Ho Chi Minh.

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Uncle Ho's legacy lives on in Vietnam

Written by simmons

June 7th, 2012 at 11:17 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Tips for exploring Bangkok for free

Posted: June 3, 2012 at 1:16 pm


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BANGKOK Chaos is part of Bangkok's charm. But the savvy traveler quickly learns how to navigate Bangkok's legendary traffic jams and discover its soul, a mix of urban jungle and Buddhist serenity where shopping and eating are national pastimes.

Despite the weak dollar, Bangkok remains one of the best deals in Asia. Some of the world's tastiest street food sells for as little as 25 baht (80 cents) a plate. Beat traffic by zipping down side streets in a tuk-tuk or cruising up the Chao Phraya on public express boats for stunning views of the city's premier attractions both for about a dollar. Other favorite outings are free:

LUMPINI PARK: An oasis of tropical gardens and paved jogging paths in the middle of the city. Beat the heat by avoiding the park in midday. There are early-morning tai chi classes and after-work aerobics classes. You can rent paddle boats, take the kids to one of Bangkok's best outdoor playgrounds or marvel at the massive monitor lizards in the lake.

CHATUCHAK MARKET: Browsing is free at the largest outdoor market in Thailand, and it's a sight to see whether or not you take something home. Chatuchak's thousands of stalls are divided into sections that include antiques, home dcor, clothing and food. You can find everything from Buddha statues and Thai handicrafts to handmade jewelry and the occasional endangered species in the live animal section. For upscale, air-conditioned window shopping, head to shopping malls Siam Paragon, Emporium or Central World.

TEMPLE HOPPING: Catch some karma at Bangkok's many Buddhist temples, known in Thai as "wats." Some of the most popular, Wat Po and Wat Arun, ask foreigners to pay a minimal entrance fee but hundreds of others are free, including the impressive Temple of the Golden Mount, also known as Wat Saket. A temple compound's shaded walkways and quiet corners are a perfect place to escape the sensory overload on Bangkok's busy streets.

FLOWER MARKET: Bangkok's largest flower market, Pak Klong Talat, is open 24 hours but it's busiest just after 2 a.m. when traders unload their fresh-cut blossoms in bulk. It's a kaleidoscope of colors with an incredible selection of orchids at jaw-droppingly cheap prices. The market is just south of Wat Pho and not far from the Grand Palace in the historical section of old Bangkok.

PATPONG: For a walk on Bangkok's wild side, take an evening stroll along Patpong Road. It offers the incongruous mix of go-go bars and evening shopping. A thriving night market selling T-shirts, pirated DVDs and other souvenirs runs through the red-light district and spills onto the adjacent Silom Road, which is packed with street food vendors, restaurants and bars.

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Tips for exploring Bangkok for free

Written by simmons

June 3rd, 2012 at 1:16 pm

Posted in Thai Chi

Bangkok: 5 free things to do

Posted: May 28, 2012 at 1:21 pm


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BANGKOK Chaos is part of Bangkok's charm. But the savvy traveler quickly learns how to navigate Bangkok's legendary traffic jams and discover its soul, a mix of urban jungle and Buddhist serenity where shopping and eating are national pastimes.

Despite the weak dollar, Bangkok remains one of the best deals in Asia. Some of the world's tastiest street food sells for as little as 25 baht (80 cents) a plate. Beat traffic by zipping down side streets in a tuk-tuk or cruising up the Chao Praya on public express boats for stunning views of the city's premier attractions both for about a dollar. Other favorite outings are free:

LUMPINI PARK: An oasis of tropical gardens and paved jogging paths in the middle of the city. Beat the heat by avoiding the park in midday. There are early morning tai chi classes and after work aerobics classes. You can rent paddle boats, take the kids to one of Bangkok's best outdoor playgrounds or marvel at the massive monitor lizards in the lake.

CHATUCHAK MARKET: Browsing is free at the largest outdoor market in Thailand, and it's a sight to see whether or not you take something home. Chatuchak's thousands of stalls are divided into sections that include antiques, home dcor, clothing and food. You can find everything from Buddha statues and Thai handicrafts to handmade jewelry and the occasional endangered species in the live animal section. For upscale, air-conditioned window shopping, head to shopping malls Siam Paragon, Emporium or Central World.

TEMPLE HOPPING: Catch some karma at Bangkok's many Buddhist temples, known in Thai as "wats." Some of the most popular, Wat Po and Wat Arun, ask foreigners to pay a minimal entrance fee but hundreds of others are free, including the impressive Temple of the Golden Mount, also known as Wat Saket. A temple compound's shaded walkways and quiet corners are a perfect place to escape the sensory overload on Bangkok's busy streets.

FLOWER MARKET: Bangkok's largest flower market, Pak Klong Talat, is open 24 hours but it's busiest just after 2 a.m. when traders unload their fresh-cut blossoms in bulk. It's a kaleidoscope of colors with an incredible selection of orchids at jaw-droppingly cheap prices. The market is just south of Wat Pho and not far from the Grand Palace in the historical section of old Bangkok.

PATPONG: For a walk on Bangkok's wild side, take an evening stroll along Patpong Road. It offers the incongruous mix of go-go bars and evening shopping. A thriving night market selling T-shirts, pirated DVDs and other souvenirs runs through the red-light district and spills onto the adjacent Silom Road, which is packed with street food vendors, restaurants and bars.

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Bangkok: 5 free things to do

Written by simmons

May 28th, 2012 at 1:21 pm

Posted in Thai Chi

Bangkok: 5 free things for visitors to do

Posted: May 25, 2012 at 2:12 pm


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BANGKOK Chaos is part of Bangkok's charm. But the savvy traveler quickly learns how to navigate Bangkok's legendary traffic jams and discover its soul, a mix of urban jungle and Buddhist serenity where shopping and eating are national pastimes.

Despite the weak dollar, Bangkok remains one of the best deals in Asia. Some of the world's tastiest street food sells for as little as 25 baht (80 cents) a plate. Beat traffic by zipping down side streets in a tuk-tuk or cruising up the Chao Praya on public express boats for stunning views of the city's premier attractions — both for about a dollar. Other favorite outings are free:

LUMPINI PARK: An oasis of tropical gardens and paved jogging paths in the middle of the city. Beat the heat by avoiding the park in midday. There are early morning tai chi classes and after work aerobics classes. You can rent paddle boats, take the kids to one of Bangkok's best outdoor playgrounds or marvel at the massive monitor lizards in the lake.

CHATUCHAK MARKET: Browsing is free at the largest outdoor market in Thailand, and it's a sight to see whether or not you take something home. Chatuchak's thousands of stalls are divided into sections that include antiques, home decor, clothing and food. You can find everything from Buddha statues and Thai handicrafts to handmade jewelry and the occasional endangered species in the live animal section. For upscale, air-conditioned window shopping, head to shopping malls Siam Paragon, Emporium or Central World.

TEMPLE HOPPING: Catch some karma at Bangkok's many Buddhist temples, known in Thai as "wats." Some of the most popular, Wat Po and Wat Arun, ask foreigners to pay a minimal entrance fee but hundreds of others are free, including the impressive Temple of the Golden Mount, also known as Wat Saket. A temple compound's shaded walkways and quiet corners are a perfect place to escape the sensory overload on Bangkok's busy streets.

FLOWER MARKET: Bangkok's largest flower market, Pak Klong Talat, is open 24 hours but it's busiest just after 2 a.m. when traders unload their fresh-cut blossoms in bulk. It's a kaleidoscope of colors with an incredible selection of orchids at jaw-droppingly cheap prices. The market is just south of Wat Pho and not far from the Grand Palace in the historical section of old Bangkok.

PATPONG: For a walk on Bangkok's wild side, take an evening stroll along Patpong Road. It offers the incongruous mix of go-go bars and evening shopping. A thriving night market selling T-shirts, pirated DVDs and other souvenirs runs through the red-light district and spills onto the adjacent Silom Road, which is packed with street food vendors, restaurants and bars.

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Bangkok: 5 free things for visitors to do

Written by simmons

May 25th, 2012 at 2:12 pm

Posted in Thai Chi

Vietnamese intellectuals back PH Panatag claim

Posted: May 22, 2012 at 11:14 am


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Published : Tuesday, May 22, 2012 00:00 Article Views : 3,764

HANOI: Sixty-six Vietnamese from various backgrounds and fields, supported the Philippines claim on the Panatag (Scarborough) Shoal and called on China to abandon its absurd marital claim on the area.

The group, which include well-known intellectuals and academicians in Vietnam and overseas, sent a letter to Philippine Ambassador to Vietnam Jerril Galban Santos to express their support for the Philippines in the standoff with China.

Among the signatories are a former Vietnamese ambassador to China, several heads of tertiary institutions, poets and social scientists.

We fully support the sovereign rights of the Philippines in the Panatag Shoal area and the Philippiness actions to defend her sovereign rights, they said in their letter.

We resolutely oppose Chinas attempts to use its nine-dashed line, which is completely without historical or legal basis, to encroach on the Exclusive Economic Zones and continental shelves of the Philippines, Vietnam and other Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) countries. We strongly oppose Chinas illegal actions and threats of force in the Panatag Shoal dispute, they added.

The group also backed the Philippine governments proposal to submit the dispute to the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (Itlos).

We call on the governments and citizens of all Asean countries to take concrete actions to show solidarity with the Philippines, to assist her in the defense of her sovereign rights in the Panatag Shoal area, and to defend the sovereign rights of each and every Asean country as affirmed in United Nations Convention on the Law of the Seas (Unclos), they said.

We solemnly declare that Chinas illegal nine-dashed line constitutes a threat to peaceful cooperation and sustainable development in Southeast Asia. To re-establish stability and ensure freedom of navigation in the West Philippines Sea/East Sea, we demand that China gives up its absurd maritime claims in these waters. The just cause of the government and people of the Philippines will prevail, they added.

Those who signed the letter were Major-General Nguyen Trong Vinh, Former Ambassador of The Socialist Republic of Vietnam to PR China, Prof. Nguyen Minh Thuyet, PhD, Former Vice-President, The Committee for Culture, Education and Youth, National Assembly, Nguyen Ngoc, Writer, Bui Ngoc Tan, Writer, Thanh Thao, Poet, Prof. Pham Duy Hien, PhD, Former Director, Da Lat Institute of Atom, Prof. Nguyen Hue Chi, Former President of Scientific Committee, Institute of Vietnamese Literature, Pham Toan, Educator, Prof. Nguyen The Hung, PhD, University of Da Nang, Vice President, Vietnamese Association of Hydromechanics, Prof. Chu Hao, Director, Tri Thuc Publisher, Dr. Nguyen Dinh Nguyen, PhD, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. Association Prof. Hoang Dung, PhD, Ho Chi Minh City University of Pedagogy, Pham Xuan Nguyen, President, Association of Ha Noi Writers, Nguyen Ba Dung, Engineer, Pham Hoang Quan, Independent Researcher, Hoang Hung, Poet, Prof. Tuong Lai, Former President, The Institute of Sociology of Vietnam, Nguyen Quang A, PhD, Former President, The Institute of Development Studies, Nguyen Ngoc Giao, Former Lecturer, Freelance Writer, Paris, France, Thai Van Cau, Space Science Specialist, USA, Nguyen Xuan Dien, PhD, Institute of Han-Nom, Dinh Kim Phuc, Researcher on the East Sea and Vietnamese Islands, Le Dang Doanh, PhD, Former Director, Central Institute of Economic Management (CIEM), Prof. Hoang Tuy, PhD, Former President, Scientific Committee of Vietnam Institute of Mathematics, Prof. Emeritus Nguyen Dang Hung, PhD, University of Liege, Belgium, To Van Truong, PhD, Specialist of Vietnamese Natural Resources and Environment, Ha Si Phu, PhD, 4E Bui Thi Xuan Str., Dang Thi Thanh Bien, Phan Dac Lu, Poet, Mac Lam, Journalist, Mai Thai Linh, Former Teacher, Researcher, Huynh Nhat Hai, retired Official, Huynh Nhat Tan, Ha Dinh Nguyen, 76, Tran Thanh Van, Association Prof. Dang Ngoc Le, PhD, President, Association of Linguistics of Ho Chi Minh City, Tran Thi Khanh, Editor, Nguyen Thi Tu Huy, PhD, lawyer Tran Quoc Thuan, Former Permanent Vice Chairman, Office of National Assembly of the SR of Vietnam, Kha Luong Ngai, Former Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Sai Gon Giai Phong News, Cao Lap, Former Political Prisoner in Con Dao, Tran Minh Thao, Writer, Dang Thi Hao, PhD, Former Vice Head, Section of Ancient and Mediveal Literature, Institute of Literature, Ha Noi, Vu Quang Viet, Specialist of Economics for UN, USA, Prof. Nguyen Dinh Cong, PhD, Former Chair of the Construction Department, University of Construction, Ha Noi, Nguyen Duc Hiep, Specialist of the Atmosphere, Office of Environment and Heritages, NSW, Australia.

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Vietnamese intellectuals back PH Panatag claim

Written by simmons

May 22nd, 2012 at 11:14 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Facilitator/Trainer for Baseline Survey

Posted: at 11:14 am


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The Intergeneration Deaf Education Outreach Project - IDEO JSDF TF 099058

TERMS OF REFERENCE Facilitator/Trainer for Baseline Survey

Project: Intergeneration Deaf Education Outreach Title: Facilitator/Trainer for Baseline Survey Report to: Project Manager

BACKGROUND:

The Intergenerational Deaf Education Outreach Project IDEO is implemented by World Concern Development Organization (WCDO) in cooperation with the Ministry of Education and Training (MOET) through four years (2011 2015) in four provinces of Hanoi, Thai Nguyen, Hue and Ho Chi Minh City. The Project is funded by the Japanese Social Development Fund, entrusted to the management of the World Bank.

Project Goal: To assist young deaf children to integrate into mainstream society, by piloting an innovative joint family and institution-based delivery system comprising screening, family support, and preschool services.

Main Objectives/Components:

Component 1: Demonstrating joint family-institution pre-school education for deaf children and developing essential knowledge base The component aims to create affordable ways of helping families with a deaf child via a 5-fulltime-person Family Support Team (comprising of two deaf "Family Mentors", one sign language teacher, one hearing teacher of the deaf children, and one hearing communication facilitator/interpreter) placed in each of the six centers/schools countrywide. In each selected center/school a model classroom will be established and resourced for use during training and to try out checklists and procedures, etc. The program will provide deaf children with early opportunities to acquire sign language in parallel with the ongoing opportunities to learn to speak through speech therapy and build up their parents knowledge and confidence about their children's capacity to communicate, learn and engage with a wider community.

An essential knowledge base will be established to support training, monitor the efficacy of educational approaches for young deaf children, conduct demonstration of program mechanisms and outcomes, and devise assessment tools for language development of the child. This knowledge base will provide information on preschool deaf education from local and global sources within Vietnam, and also support the use of research-based knowledge during decision-making processes about educational placement and communication for deaf children.

Component 2: Developing professional human resources for pre-school deaf education This component aims to train deaf adults to become family educators, hearing signing people to facilitate communication between hearing and deaf people in family and school settings, and hearing teachers of deaf children to assess and accommodate student language needs so that together they can provide effective preschool readiness services for deaf children and their families. This component will support the demonstration model in Component 1 to form Family Support Teams (FST). There will be the involvement from various international and national experts in training and supervising the activities.

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Facilitator/Trainer for Baseline Survey

Written by simmons

May 22nd, 2012 at 11:14 am

Posted in Thai Chi

Drug pushers get 27 years | National news | The Phnom Penh Post – Cambodia's Newspaper of Record

Posted: May 19, 2012 at 3:11 pm


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Lee Jen Ton (left) and Tsen Chi Shen enter the Phnom Penh Municipal Court yesterday. Photograph: Vireak Mai/Phnom Penh Post

Kor Vandy, presiding judge at the Phnom Penh Municipal Court, said Tsen Chi Shen and Lee Jen Ton had been arrested after a package containing 347 grams of the powder was intercepted in August last year.

Tsen told the court in April he had entered Cambodia a year earlier as a door and window seller, but had turned to smuggling drugs after falling into gambling-related debt.

I sent packs of drugs to Taiwan three times, and each time I received commission of $1,000, he said, adding that he sent the heroin via the Veng Tai Veng company, which was sub-sent through Cambodia Express.

Lee, however, continued to protest his innocence.

He admitted having stayed in the same Phnom Penh guesthouse as Tsen, but said he had not been aware Tsen had been packing and sending the powder to Taiwan.

Yeng Bunna, chief of the Interior Ministrys anti-drug department, said the drug powder had been discovered after Veng Thai Veng reported a suspicious package. Police arrested Lee before raiding a room at the guesthouse.

Tsen had been arrested in October, police said.

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Drug pushers get 27 years | National news | The Phnom Penh Post - Cambodia's Newspaper of Record

Written by simmons

May 19th, 2012 at 3:11 pm

Posted in Thai Chi

Bus plunges into Vietnam river bank; 34 killed

Posted: at 3:11 pm


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HANOI, Vietnam (AP) A crowded overnight bus plunged off a bridge into a river in central Vietnam, killing 34 passengers and injuring 21 others in one of the country's deadliest road accidents.

The 50-seat coach lost control and ripped through the bridge's guardrails Thursday night, diving about 18 meters (60 feet) and landing on its top, partially submerged in the Serepok River, said local official Tran Bao Que.

"When the accident happened, everyone in the bus was sleeping," survivor Nguyen Van Khanh told online news site Dan Tri. "I vaguely heard a noise like a gun fire and then people were screaming when the bus was overturned. I managed to escape through a window which was smashed opened by others."

Que said it took rescuers four hours to pull the bodies from the bus, which was traveling on a regular 350-kilometer (217-mile) route from the central highland province of Dak Lak to the southern commercial hub of Ho Chi Minh City.

Rescuers used axes to try to free trapped passengers. Photos showed a body hanging limply out the side of the ripped-open vehicle, which was hoisted out of the river by crane early Friday morning.

Y Bliu Arul, deputy director of the General Hospital in Dak Lak, says the bus's two drivers were among the 32 people who died at the scene. Two others died at the hospital. Of the 21 injured, 16 were in serious condition.

Authorities are investigating the cause of the crash. Vietnam has one of the world's highest traffic fatality rates, with more than 11,000 people killed each year.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Bus plunges into Vietnam river bank; 34 killed

Written by simmons

May 19th, 2012 at 3:11 pm

Posted in Thai Chi


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