Three ways the Yoga industry can thrive in our Covid-19 world – Stuff.co.nz

Posted: January 5, 2021 at 3:50 am


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There are three key things yoga studios can do to keep their doors open and connect with their communities during these challenging times.

OPINION: The global yoga industry is facing tough times as Covid-19 takes its toll. When people need yoga more than ever, famed yoga studios around the world are shutting their doors, as the pandemic and restrictions take their toll on thousands of businesses.

In New Zealand, were relatively fortunate, as we experience an almost back-to-normal life.

However, the hundreds of yoga studios around New Zealand are struggling to bounce back, particularly in Auckland, which has had to contend with two lockdowns.

Growth hasnt recovered from the first Level 2 restrictions, and communities havent come back to their mats in-studio, preferring to continue to practice from the safety of their home.

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What does this mean for our yoga industry?

Long-term, whats happening overseas will impact us for many years to come.

Teacher trainers are unable to travel and teach budding yoga instructors, and we risk losing businesses unless we collectively adapt and remain agile.

2020 has turned our lives upside down.

People are wary of others and being in enclosed spaces with strangers, particularly our elderly.

Our work patterns have changed, disrupting routines.

Covid-19 burnout and fatigue mean we arent looking after ourselves as well as we could and turning up on the mat means confronting whats really going on.

Online yoga classes were some of the most popular workouts during Lockdown, but how do we encourage people back to mat in-class to save our studios?

There are three key things yoga studios can do to keep their doors open and connect with their communities during these challenging times.

Adding additional income streams to your business will help you get through Covid-19 until in-studio numbers return to normal. Dont put (or keep) your eggs in one basket!

Demand for online classes wont reduce anytime soon, so if you havent explored online classes now is the time.

Consider other ways you can connect with your yogis - do you offer retreats? Can you go niche - focus on pregnancy yoga, injury/rehabilitation or working with seniors? Perhaps explore yoga for medicine. Offer your community more reasons to engage with you.

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enSoul yoga classes.

The beautiful thing about yoga communities is the strength we gain from helping each other. Talk to your students - ask them for their feedback and how theyre feeling. Are there any classes they want to take that you dont currently offer?

Is there anything you can do to help them return to the mat? Can they spread the word for you? The one thing weve learnt this year is that were all in this together, tap into your client base for help, theyre your biggest fans.

In the early days of Covid-19, we would stay online after our yoga classes to connect with our students, which was crucial, especially for people living on their own.

Communication is everything - especially in the fast-moving world of 2020. Reassure your students youve got the safety and wellness procedures down, that their yoga studio is still here for them and is still the same. Talk about the benefits yoga has in helping them deal with the burnout and stress of 2020, to encourage them back to class.

As yoga teachers, we have a responsibility to help our communities cope with the ongoing impacts of the global pandemic.

The mental health impacts of Covid-19 cant be underestimated - and will continue to be felt for some time.

Yoga teachers, and studios, will play a crucial role in rebuilding connectedness, so lets do all we can to support and help each other succeed.

Established in 2015, Ensoul is a yoga and wellness studio based on the Kpiti Coast. Offering online and in-studio classes, it is led by Shannon Jeffries and Tamihana Paurini. Leading a yoga and wellness revolution, they share the power of yoga to strengthen, heal and promote overall wellness in a safe and supportive environment, creating a community of like-minded people, and life-long habits. You can find out more and join at http://www.ensoul.co.nz.

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January 5th, 2021 at 3:50 am

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