Page 129«..1020..126127128129

Archive for the ‘Organic Food’ Category

6 Tips on Raising Organic Kids [Vegan Mofo #26] – Video

Posted: October 1, 2014 at 7:54 am


without comments


6 Tips on Raising Organic Kids [Vegan Mofo #26]
Mother and gardener Sarah Tracey gives her best advice on how to feed a family organic food on a budget. Sign up for the video mailing list: http://bit.ly/evgmofolist http://www.ecovegangal.c...

By: Eco-Vegan Gal

Excerpt from:

6 Tips on Raising Organic Kids [Vegan Mofo #26] - Video

Written by simmons

October 1st, 2014 at 7:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

Organic food – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Posted: at 7:54 am


without comments

Organic foods are produced using methods of organic farming. Currently, the European Union, the United States, Canada, Mexico, Japan and many other countries require producers to obtain special certification in order to market food as organic within their borders. In the context of these regulations, organic food is food produced in a way that complies with organic standards set by national governments and international organizations. Organic food production is a heavily regulated industry, distinct from private gardening.

While the organic standard is defined differently in different jurisdictions, in general organic farming responds to site-specific farming and crop conditions by integrating cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic pesticides and chemical fertilizers are not allowed, although certain organically approved pesticides may be used under limited conditions. In general, organic foods are also not processed using irradiation, industrial solvents, or chemical food additives.[1]

While there may be some differences in the amounts of nutrients and anti-nutrients when organically produced food and conventionally produced food are compared, the variable nature of food production and handling makes it difficult to generalize results, and there is insufficient evidence to make claims that organic food is safer or healthier than conventional food.[2][3][4][5][6] Claims that organic food tastes better are generally not supported by evidence.[3][7]

For the vast majority of its history, agriculture can be described as having been organic; only during the 20th century was a large supply of new chemicals introduced to the food supply.[8] The organic farming movement arose in the 1940s in response to the industrialization of agriculture known as the Green Revolution.[9]

In 1939, Lord Northbourne coined the term organic farming in his book Look to the Land (1940), out of his conception of "the farm as organism," to describe a holistic, ecologically balanced approach to farmingin contrast to what he called chemical farming, which relied on "imported fertility" and "cannot be self-sufficient nor an organic whole."[10] Early soil scientists also described the differences in soil composition when animal manures were used as "organic", because they contain carbon compounds where superphosphates and haber process nitrogen do not. Their respective use effects humus content of soil.[11][12] This is different from the scientific use of the term "organic" in chemistry, which refers to a class of molecules that contain carbon, especially those involved in the chemistry of life. This class of molecules includes everything likely to be considered edible, and include most pesticides and toxins too, therefore the term "organic" and, especially, the term "inorganic" (sometimes wrongly used as a contrast by the popular press) as they apply to organic chemistry is an equivocation fallacy when applied to farming, the production of food, and to foodstuffs themselves. Properly used in this agricultural science context, "organic" refers to the methods grown and processed, not necessarily the chemical composition of the food.

Ideas that organic food could be healthier and better for the environment originated in the early days of the organic movement as a result of publications like the 1943 book, The Living Soil.[13][14] Gardening and Farming for Health or Disease,[15]

Early consumers interested in organic food would look for non-chemically treated, non-use of unapproved pesticides, fresh or minimally processed food. They mostly had to buy directly from growers. Later, "Know your farmer, know your food" became the motto of a new initiative instituted by the USDA in September 2009.[16] Personal definitions of what constituted "organic" were developed through firsthand experience: by talking to farmers, seeing farm conditions, and farming activities. Small farms grew vegetables (and raised livestock) using organic farming practices, with or without certification, and the individual consumer monitored.[citation needed]

Small specialty health food stores and co-operatives were instrumental to bringing organic food to a wider audience.[citation needed] As demand for organic foods continued to increase, high volume sales through mass outlets such as supermarkets rapidly replaced the direct farmer connection.[citation needed] Today there is no limit to organic farm sizes and many large corporate farms currently have an organic division. However, for supermarket consumers, food production is not easily observable, and product labeling, like "certified organic", is relied on. Government regulations and third-party inspectors are looked to for assurance.[citation needed]

In the 1970s, interest in organic food grew with the publication of Silent spring[17] and the rise of the environmental movement, and was also spurred by food-related health scares like the concerns about Alar that arose in the mid-1980s. [18]

Organic food production is a self-regulated industry with government oversight in some countries, distinct from private gardening. Currently, the European Union, the United States, Canada, Japan and many other countries require producers to obtain special certification based on government-defined standards in order to market food as organic within their borders. In the context of these regulations, foods marketed as organic are produced in a way that complies with organic standards set by national governments and international organic industry trade organizations.

Read the rest here:

Organic food - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Written by simmons

October 1st, 2014 at 7:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

Organic foods: Are they safer? More nutritious? – Mayo Clinic

Posted: at 7:54 am


without comments

Organic foods: Are they safer? More nutritious?

Discover the real difference between organic foods and their traditionally grown counterparts when it comes to nutrition, safety and price.

Once found only in health food stores, organic food is now a regular feature at most supermarkets. And that's created a bit of a dilemma in the produce aisle.

On one hand, you have a conventionally grown apple. On the other, you have one that's organic. Both apples are firm, shiny and red. Both provide vitamins and fiber, and both are free of fat, sodium and cholesterol. Which should you choose? Get the facts before you shop.

The word "organic" refers to the way farmers grow and process agricultural products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy products and meat. Organic farming practices are designed to encourage soil and water conservation and reduce pollution.

Farmers who grow organic produce don't use conventional methods to fertilize and control weeds. Examples of organic farming practices include using natural fertilizers to feed soil and plants, and using crop rotation or mulch to manage weeds.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has established an organic certification program that requires all organic foods to meet strict government standards. These standards regulate how such foods are grown, handled and processed.

Any product labeled as organic must be USDA certified. Only producers who sell less than $5,000 a year in organic foods are exempt from this certification; however, they're still required to follow the USDA's standards for organic foods.

If a food bears a USDA Organic label, it means it's produced and processed according to the USDA standards. The seal is voluntary, but many organic producers use it.

Products certified 95 percent or more organic may display this USDA seal.

See the original post:

Organic foods: Are they safer? More nutritious? - Mayo Clinic

Written by simmons

October 1st, 2014 at 7:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

The Best Stocks for Organic Food Lovers

Posted: at 7:54 am


without comments

When investors think of organic food stocks, the first company to come to mind is often Whole Foods . And why not? The company that pioneered the organic grocery business still dominates it, with a valuation at one time over $20 billion.

However, while Whole Foods the company still has millions of admirers, the stock has been struggling, falling to a 52-week low in July,as comparable sales have slipped and the company's growth prospects dimmed. Mainstream grocers such as Wal-Mart and Target have crept in on the organic territory even as private companies such as Trader Joe's and other organic chains have expanded.

For investors looking to make a buck on the growing organic food space, there are better places to put your money. Increasing competition at the retail level has been tough on Whole Foods and other grocers, but it's been a boon for producers of organic foods. Let's take a look at few stocks that have been riding this wave and should continue to grow.

1. WhiteWave Foods WhiteWave Foods might not be a household name, but chances are you're familiar with many of its products, including Silk soy milk and Horizon Organic milk, both of which are top-selling brands nationwide.

Source: Company Website.

WhiteWave Foods began its history as a publicly traded company when Dean Foods announced that it would spin off its organic arm. Since the separation was completed in May 2013, WhiteWave shares have more than doubled to $36 while the stock of its former parent has slipped more than 20%, a reflection of the divergence in the traditional and alternative dairy segments. In its most recent quarter, organic net sales grew 11% while overall revenue jumped 36% thanks to its recent acquisition of organic-foods maker Earthbound Farm. That performance helped drive operating income up more than 50% to $66 million. And WhiteWave's aggressive expansion strategy didn't stop with its Earthbound Farm acquisition. Earlier in September, the company snatched up So Delicious Dairy Free, makers of vegan products such as coconut milk and frozen desserts, for $195 million in cash. That move will tack on another $115 million in annual revenue, or about 4% growth, off the bat, and is expected to boost the bottom line further as cost-saving synergies are implemented.

With its industry-leading distribution network, organic sales growth, and recent acquisitions, WhiteWave Foods is putting itself in position to be a dominant player in the growing organic market for the next generation. The stock isn't cheap, but the acquisitions will help boost bottom-line growth and its competitive advantage.

2. Boulder Brands The parent of butter-alternative Smart Balance has had its struggles this year. The stock is off 30% from its 52-week high, and operating income fell 20% in its most recent quarter despite 19% revenue growth. Taking the longer view, however, Boulder Brands still looks promising. The stock has more than doubled since 2012, and the recent downturn on the bottom line was due to higher input costs, specifically elevated egg-white prices. While Smart Balance sales have flattened, growth in its Natural segment, which includes the brands Udi's, Glutino, and EVOL, is soaring, up 35% in the most recent quarter. With its Udi's line, which saw sales jump 34% in the last quarter, Boulder is particularly strong in the growing gluten-free space; with some estimates indicating a target audience of as many as 44 million Americans for a gluten-free products, there should plenty of room for growth.

Management has promised a stronger second half of the year, and has locked in egg-white prices, which should help control costs. If the company can deliver on earnings expectations over the next two quarters, I'd expect the stock to regain its upward momentum as revenue growth is still strong.

Originally posted here:

The Best Stocks for Organic Food Lovers

Written by simmons

October 1st, 2014 at 7:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

ARMM, state college sign MOA for organic food production in Basilan

Posted: at 7:54 am


without comments

By Charlie C. Sease |Inquirer Mindanao

COTABATO CITY, Philippines A state college and the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) have signed a memorandum of agreement to provide livelihood, initially to Basilan farming folk, through organic food production currently in demand because of its health benefits.

The ARMM, through its HELPS (Health, Education, Livelihood, Peace and Synergy) program, agreed to bankroll P8.5 million for the business venture of producing organically grown fish, vegetables and farm animals with its partner the Aces Polytechnic College of Basilan. The two institutions signed the MOA last Saturday.

ARMM Gov. Mujiv Hataman, impressed by the organic food samples produced by the Basilan farming and fishing cooperatives, said, They are not only nutritious but certified organic food that most people nowadays prefer.

Dr. Francisco Dela Pea, APCB president, who signed the MOA with Hataman, has assured the products are 100 percent free of preservatives, anti-biotic ingredients, synthetic additives, and growth hormones.

Dela Pea said that with the ARMM-HELPS financial assistance, a business boom in halal food could happen.

Using Barangay Balas in Lamitan City as pilot site for the ARMM-HELPS-assisted project, Hataman said another P8.5 million has been earmarked for the construction of an organic feed mill processing plant and other facilities.

A three-hectare model farm might produce enough organic fish, poultry products, goat and other farm animals, said Anwar Upahm, ARMM-HELPS program manager.

Hataman vowed to spread the HELPS initiative to other ARMM provinces, saying some 100 different villages in the region would likely avail of it by 2015.

Follow Us

Go here to read the rest:

ARMM, state college sign MOA for organic food production in Basilan

Written by simmons

October 1st, 2014 at 7:54 am

Posted in Organic Food

Global Survey Says We’re Eating Better, But Our Diet Is Still Unsustainable

Posted: at 7:54 am


without comments

More people are eating local and organic foods and plan to consume less meat and bottled water. However, most also believe they lack enough information and influence to become more environmentally sustainable consumers, a new National Geographic survey has found.

The latest Greendex survey by the National Geographic Society and the research consulting firm GlobeScan measured consumption habits and attitudes in 18 countries. Each was scored on the relative size of its environmental footprint. (Related: 8 Surprising, Depressing, and Hopeful Findings From Global Survey of Environmental Attitudes.)

This year's report, the fifth since 2008, focused on food. It found noticeable improvements in eating habits even as environmentally sustainable behavior when it came to housing, transportation, and consumer goods appeared stuck or had worsened.

Consumers in 11 countries, including South Korea, Hungary, Australia, and Canada, had higher food scores compared with their scores in the previous survey, in 2012. (Read "The Next Green Revolution" in National Geographic magazine.)

The Greendex is a quantitative study of 18,000 consumers in a total of 18 countries (14 in 2008, 17 in 2009 through 2012) asked about energy consumption and conservation, transportation choices, food sources, the relative use of green products versus conventional products, attitudes toward the environment and sustainability, and knowledge of environmental concerns. A group of international experts helped determine the behaviors that were most critical to investigate.

NGM Staff

India, which has ranked first in food sustainability in every Greendex, came out far ahead again, thanks to its culturally dictated eating habits. Nearly one in four Indians is a vegetarian, and those who aren't tend to avoid beef, the most environmentally damaging meat. Indians have reduced the amount of imported food they eat and increased their consumption of locally produced, homegrown, and organic foods.

Sprawling Countries Eat the Most Locally

More than half of consumers surveyed frequently eat locally grown food. Russians are the biggest locavores77 percent consume local food daily or several times a weekfollowed by Indians and Chinese.

Russians, along with Hungarians, Swedes and Germans, also are eating more organic food and natural foods, now more and more part of mainstream diets.

Follow this link:

Global Survey Says We're Eating Better, But Our Diet Is Still Unsustainable

Written by simmons

October 1st, 2014 at 7:54 am

Posted in Organic Food


Page 129«..1020..126127128129