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George Gurdjieff – Religious Figure – Biography

Posted: February 9, 2018 at 9:42 am


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During the 1920s and '30s, George Gurdjieff accumulated followers who were interested in his methods for attaining a higher level of consciousness.

G.I. Gurdjieff was born circa 1866 in Alexandropol (present-day Armenia). In 1922, after settling in France, he reopened his Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man. There, he taught students to reintegrate their spiritual nature with their daily modern lives. Gurdjieff's followers included writers P.L. Travers and Katherine Mansfield. He died in Neuilly, France (near Paris) in 1949.

George Ivanovich Gurdjieff, generally referred to as G.I. Gurdjieff, was born in Alexandropol, in the Armenian region of the Russia Empire (present-day Armenia). His birth date is possibly January 13, 1866a date that is listed in one passport. However, another passport puts the date as December 28, 1877, and some close friends believed that his birth year was 1872. Gurdjieff himself was vague about his origins.

Gurdjieff's mother was Armenian and his father was Greek. Though his father worked as a carpenter, he also regaled Gurdjieff and others with recitations of legends, such as the epic of Gilgamesh. These tales may have spurred Gurdjieff's later belief in the existence of ancient knowledge that surpassed what was offered by science and religion.

Gurdjieff received early tutelage from the dean of the military cathedral at Kars, who was a priest and family friend. According to his autobiography, Meetings with Remarkable Men, he journeyed across Central Asia, Egypt and India in a voyage of spiritual discovery. However, there is no corroboration for Gurdjieff's self-reported accounting of his travels between 1887 and 1911.

When his travels were over, Gurdjieff returned to Russia. Following the Russian Revolution of 1917, he moved to Tiflis, Georgia, where he opened the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in 1919. A few years later, Gurdjieff settled in France, where his institute took shape once more.

From his base at the Chteau du Prieur, near Fontainebleau, Gurdjieff shared his new philosophy. He believed that man was in an almost constant sleep state, and that people must work to revive themselves in order to regain the higher consciousness that they are capable of. He also averred that the sleep state made people easy to manipulate, and was therefore a proponent of questioning everything.

At Fontainebleau, Gurdjieff often required people to listen to his writings as they were read aloud. People at the center also performed exercises and dance movements, sometimes to music created by Gurdjieff and composer Thomas de Hartmann.

Though he had brought followers with him to France, Gurdjieff gained more once he was ensconced in Fontainebleau, particularly as one early acolyte, P.D. Ouspensky, elucidated and propagated his teachings. His prominent followers included architect Frank Lloyd Wright's third wife, Olgivanna Hinzenburg, writer Katherine Mansfield, editor A.R. Orage and Mary Poppins author P.L. Travers.

Gurdjieff developed a special vocabulary of his own in some of his writings, using words such as "blastegoklornian." For his disciples, these words increased his aura of deep understanding and mystery. For Gurdjieff's detractors, they made his writings even more nonsensical.

Gurdjieff continued teaching even after his Fontainebleau center closed its doors in 1933. He remained in Paris during World War II, surviving under the German occupation. On October 29, 1949, in Neuilly, France (near Paris), he died at the approximate age of 83. He left behind works that include All and Everything (containing Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson, Meetings with Remarkable Men and Life Is Real Only Then, When 'I Am') and The Herald of Coming Good.

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George Gurdjieff - Religious Figure - Biography

Written by grays

February 9th, 2018 at 9:42 am

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George Gurdjieff – Religious Figure – Biography.com

Posted: December 28, 2017 at 2:46 pm


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During the 1920s and '30s, George Gurdjieff accumulated followers who were interested in his methods for attaining a higher level of consciousness.

G.I. Gurdjieff was born circa 1866 in Alexandropol (present-day Armenia). In 1922, after settling in France, he reopened his Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man. There, he taught students to reintegrate their spiritual nature with their daily modern lives. Gurdjieff's followers included writers P.L. Travers and Katherine Mansfield. He died in Neuilly, France (near Paris) in 1949.

George Ivanovich Gurdjieff, generally referred to as G.I. Gurdjieff, was born in Alexandropol, in the Armenian region of the Russia Empire (present-day Armenia). His birth date is possibly January 13, 1866a date that is listed in one passport. However, another passport puts the date as December 28, 1877, and some close friends believed that his birth year was 1872. Gurdjieff himself was vague about his origins.

Gurdjieff's mother was Armenian and his father was Greek. Though his father worked as a carpenter, he also regaled Gurdjieff and others with recitations of legends, such as the epic of Gilgamesh. These tales may have spurred Gurdjieff's later belief in the existence of ancient knowledge that surpassed what was offered by science and religion.

Gurdjieff received early tutelage from the dean of the military cathedral at Kars, who was a priest and family friend. According to his autobiography, Meetings with Remarkable Men, he journeyed across Central Asia, Egypt and India in a voyage of spiritual discovery. However, there is no corroboration for Gurdjieff's self-reported accounting of his travels between 1887 and 1911.

When his travels were over, Gurdjieff returned to Russia. Following the Russian Revolution of 1917, he moved to Tiflis, Georgia, where he opened the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in 1919. A few years later, Gurdjieff settled in France, where his institute took shape once more.

From his base at the Chteau du Prieur, near Fontainebleau, Gurdjieff shared his new philosophy. He believed that man was in an almost constant sleep state, and that people must work to revive themselves in order to regain the higher consciousness that they are capable of. He also averred that the sleep state made people easy to manipulate, and was therefore a proponent of questioning everything.

At Fontainebleau, Gurdjieff often required people to listen to his writings as they were read aloud. People at the center also performed exercises and dance movements, sometimes to music created by Gurdjieff and composer Thomas de Hartmann.

Though he had brought followers with him to France, Gurdjieff gained more once he was ensconced in Fontainebleau, particularly as one early acolyte, P.D. Ouspensky, elucidated and propagated his teachings. His prominent followers included architect Frank Lloyd Wright's third wife, Olgivanna Hinzenburg, writer Katherine Mansfield, editor A.R. Orage and Mary Poppins author P.L. Travers.

Gurdjieff developed a special vocabulary of his own in some of his writings, using words such as "blastegoklornian." For his disciples, these words increased his aura of deep understanding and mystery. For Gurdjieff's detractors, they made his writings even more nonsensical.

Gurdjieff continued teaching even after his Fontainebleau center closed its doors in 1933. He remained in Paris during World War II, surviving under the German occupation. On October 29, 1949, in Neuilly, France (near Paris), he died at the approximate age of 83. He left behind works that include All and Everything (containing Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson, Meetings with Remarkable Men and Life Is Real Only Then, When 'I Am') and The Herald of Coming Good.

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George Gurdjieff - Religious Figure - Biography.com

Written by simmons

December 28th, 2017 at 2:46 pm

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Gurdjieff’s Teaching of The Fourth Way

Posted: December 15, 2017 at 3:44 pm


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A practical and sacred teaching of great scale, The Fourth Way shows how to use one's ordinary lifewith all its uncertainty, negativity, suffering and pleasuresto come to real life. Rather than avoiding life or being magnetized or entrapped in it, one learns to consciously live one's life fearlessly, without imagination or regret. Actualizing the practices and principles of the teaching develops self-knowledge and being, which lead to real understanding and objective conscience.

Unlike the three classic ways of self-transformationwork with the body (hatha yoga), work with the emotions (monasticism), work with the mind (raja yoga)in The Fourth Way one stays in the midst of life working on all three centersbody, emotions, mind. The aim is to develop a harmonious individual capable of intelligent and creative response to life's opportunities and challengesa New Type of Man. [The word Man, here as elsewhere, is used in its active sense, not as gender.]

Fundamental to the teaching, yet often overlooked, is its focus on the sacred. While eschewing contemporary notions of love and the self-calming manufactured meanings of ordinary life, the teaching is grounded in Man as being the image of God, and whose actualization of that image will lessen the sorrow of our Common Father Creator. The teaching offers a unique means and perspective by which that image can be realized. Prayer is a definite part of the teaching. See the Gurdjieff Prayer Book.

Gurdjieff said, "One must learn to pray, just as one must learn everything else. Whoever knows how to pray and is able to concentrate in the proper way, his or her prayer can give results." Gurdjieff begins All and Everything with a prayer. Many prayers and hymns are given in the pages that follow. Read "Is Gurdjieff Prince Ozay?"

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Gurdjieff's Teaching of The Fourth Way

Written by grays

December 15th, 2017 at 3:44 pm

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Gurdjieff, A Beginner’s Guide: How Changing The Way We React …

Posted: December 10, 2017 at 5:42 pm


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Friedman was born in a log cabin in the South, the South Bronx, He has always kept his New York accent. He attended P.S. 95, a public grammar school, and DeWitt Clinton High School, an all boys public high school. He started the University of Michigan at 17 but was unprepared socially. This has been his modus operandi throughout life. He then spent six months in active duty and five and half years in the reserve. After active service, he attended UCLA studying for a PhD in Clinical Psychology, but after two and a half years, he flunked out. He worked as a research psychologist in the defense industry for eighteen months, and then not knowing what to do, he applied to law school since there were no requirements other than having a B.A. On a lark, he applied to Harvard Law School, and much to his amazement, was accepted. At Harvard, he was one of the students there who made the top half of the class possible. After graduation, he settled in San Francisco where he obtained a job in a small firm in San Carlos, about 25 miles south of the city. While there he created, The Goldwater Calendar: Time for a Change??? about Barry Goldwater, the Republican candidate in the 1964 presidential election. After six months at the San Carlos firm, he was fired, one of the happiest days of his life. He next worked as a lawyer in a mixed neighborhood in San Francisco which he enjoyed, but had the thought he wanted to be a university teacher. While teaching Business Law at the University of Connecticut, he wrote his unpublished book about auto insurance entitled Are You Being Taken For a Ride? A chapter of the book entitled 'Why Auto Insurance Rates Keep Going Up' was published in the September 1969 issue of The Atlantic. After one year at Uconn, he came back to San Francisco to the hippie revolution. As a staff attorney for the Legal Aid Society of Alameda County, he reached the pinnacle of his writing career having five articles published in The New Republic in the space of seven months. After eighteen months at Legal Aid, he was asked to leave because he wasn't filing any big issue cases. He had a few thousand in the bank and wondered if he could go a few months without a job. The legal aid job was the last job Friedman ever had with the exception of teaching Family Law at Warwick University in Coventry, England for eighteen months, which was more of a vacation than a job, but the vacation abruptly ended when he received an advance to write a book on English divorce laws

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Gurdjieff, A Beginner's Guide: How Changing The Way We React ...

Written by simmons

December 10th, 2017 at 5:42 pm

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Gurdjieff’s Mission – YouTube

Posted: December 8, 2017 at 4:44 am


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GurdjieffLegacy.Org - Trailer for The Life & Significance of George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff, Part II Gurdjieff's Mission: Introducing The Teaching to the West, 1912--1924. Shot on site in St. Petersburg, Moscow, Constantinople, London, Fontainebleau-en-Avon, New York and Lascaux, this documentary videonarrated by William Patrick Patterson and based on his book Struggle of the Magiciansretraces Gurdjieff's mission to introduce the teaching to the West. P.D. Ouspensky's and J.G. Bennett's enigmatic relationship with Gurdjieff are explored. Particularly stressed are the "St. Petersburg Conditions" and Gurdjieff's technique of "divine acting." The video vividly demonstrates Gurdjieff's warning to America of the rise and challenge of the East with footage recalling the 9/11 attack and its aftermath.

William Patrick Patterson, a leading international exponent and teacher of The Fourth Way is the founder/director of The Gurdjieff Legacy Foundation and has led groups, as well as given seminars and talks throughout the United States for many years. He has written nine books on the teaching and directed, written and narrated the award-winning video trilogy The Life & Significance of George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff, Introduction To Gurdjieff's Fourth Way: From Selves To Individual Self To The Self and the just released Spiritual Pilgrimage Mr. Gurdjieffs Fathers Grave. He is also the founder/editor of The Gurdjieff Journal (est. 1992), the first domestic and international Fourth Way journal.

If you are interested in Gurdjieffs Fourth Way Teaching or have questions please contact us. Come experience the Teaching firsthand at a public seminar or event. For a listing of current events visit http://www.gurdjiefflegacy.org/20anno.... For those not in a geographical area where The Gurdjieff Legacy Foundation groups exist, the Online Fourth Way School is offered. To apply visit http://www.gurdjiefflegacy.org/ofws/o.... Alternatively, you can email us at Arete@GurdjieffLegacy dot org.

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Gurdjieff's Mission - YouTube

Written by grays

December 8th, 2017 at 4:44 am

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New to this Work? Start Here | Gurdjieff Becoming Conscious

Posted: November 28, 2017 at 12:43 pm


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Why Work?

To understand why we call this practice the Work, take a moment to watch this video:

We go through our day in varying degrees of attention. Most of our daily tasks call for minimal attention, such as dressing ourselves, eating or interacting with friends and family. Some tasks require more attention; such as reading a book, drafting an email or attending a job interview.

We can perform the first group of actions while simultaneouslyperformingothers: dress ourselves while speaking on the phone, eat while chatting with our friends or interact socially while sending and receiving text messages. However, we cannot perform tasks that require attention alongside other tasks without harming our performance. We cannot read a book while speaking on the phone, draft an email while chatting with our friends, or attend a job interview while texting.

We function in varying degrees of attention

Our attention is subject to our will. If we desire, we can perform any task more attentively.We can bring attention to dressing, sensing the fabric of our clothes,matching the colors of our shirt to our slacks and shoes,etc. We can dine intentionally, tasting each bite, each sip, etc.

But we neednt be professionals in any field to verify that we can bring more or less attention to the simplest actions, and this demonstrates that:

Our attention is subject to our will

Dressing inattentively is effortless; dressing intentionally requires effort. Eating inattentively is effortless; tasting the food requires effort. Directing attention through will requires effort.This explains whyGurdjieff called his methods of self-development The Work.

Directing attention is not the end of the Work; it is a means by which, we become conscious. Few teachings make the distinction between consciousness and attention, and this is where the Fourth Way differs from most other systems.The Workis not only about being attentive; it is about being conscious, andconsciousness is self-awareness. George Gurdjieff called this self-remembering. Peter Ouspensky called it divided attention. More recently, it has become popularly known as being present. Call it as we may, without the distinction between awareness and consciousness, our efforts to be conscious can only yield partial results.

I have invited writers of all ages and cultures, and from all walks of life to share their successes and failures in their efforts to be conscious. Their posts form the foundation of ggurdjieff.com. Subscribe to receive our posts by email.

Here there are only those whopursue one aimto be able to be. George Gurdjieff

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New to this Work? Start Here | Gurdjieff Becoming Conscious

Written by grays

November 28th, 2017 at 12:43 pm

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Gurdjieff – Rare Remarkable – YouTube

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George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff - parts of the only moving images (film, footage) of G.I.Gurdjieff 1947-49. Fourth Way. Movements. Ouspensky.

Suggested reading:

In Search of the Miraculous: Fragments of an Unknown Teaching New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1949; London: Routledge, 1947. - P.D. Ouspensky

Psychological Commentaries on the Teaching of Gurdjieff and Ouspensky, Boston: Shambhala, 1996, and Samuel Weiser Inc., 1996, ISBN 0-87728-910-7 (6 volumes)

Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson by G. I. Gurdjieff (1950)

Other books off on a tangent:

The Reality of Being, by Jeanne de Salzmann, 2010, Shambhala Publications, ISBN 978-1-59030-928-5

The Unknowable Gurdjieff, Margaret Anderson, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1962, ISBN 0-7100-7656-8

Gurdjieff: A Very Great Enigma by J. G. Bennett, 1969

Gurdjieff: Making a New World by J. G. Bennett 1973, ISBN 0-06-090474-7

Idiots in Paris by J. G. Bennett and E. Bennett, 1980

Becoming Conscious with G.I. Gurdjieff, Solanges Claustres, Eureka Editions, 2005

Mount Analogue by Ren Daumal 1st edition in French, 1952; English, 1974

Gurdjieff Unveiled by Seymour Ginsburg, 2005

Our Life with Mr. Gurdjieff by Thomas and Olga de Hartmann, 1964, Revised 1983 and 1992

IT'S UP TO OURSELVES, A Mother, A Daughter and Gurdjieff, a Shared Memoir and Family Photoalbum by Jessmin and Dushka Howarth, Gurdjieff Heritage Society, 2009, ISBN 978-0-9791926-0-9

Undiscovered Country by Kathryn Hulme, 1966

The Gurdjieff Years 1929--1949: Recollections of Louise March by Annabeth McCorkle

Teachings of Gurdjieff : A Pupil's Journal : An Account of Some Years With G.I. Gurdjieff and A.R. Orage in New York and at Fontainbleau-Avon by C. S. Nott, Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1961

On Love by A. R. Orage, 1974Psychological Exercises by A. R. Orage 1976

The Fourth Way by P. D. Ouspensky, 1957

The Psychology of Man's Possible Evolution by P. D. Ouspensky, 1978

Eating The "I": An Account of The Fourth Way: The Way of Transformation in Ordinary Life, William Patrick Patterson, 1992

Boyhood with Gurdjieff by Fritz Peters, 1964

Gurdjieff Remembered by Fritz Peters, 1965

The Gurdjieff Work by Kathleen Speeth ISBN 0-87477-492-6 Gurdjieff: An Introduction To His Life and Ideas by John Shirley, 2004, ISBN 1-58542-287-8

Gurdjieff: A Master in Life, Tcheslaw Tchekhovitch, Dolmen Meadow Editions, Toronto, 2006

Toward Awakening by Jean Vaysse, 1980

Gurdjieff: An Approach to his Ideas, Michel Waldberg, 1981, ISBN 0-7100-0811-2

A Study of Gurdjieff's Teaching, Kenneth Walker, 1957

Gurdjieff: The Key Concepts, Sophia Wellbeloved, Routledge, London and N.Y., 2003, ISBN 0-415-24898-1

Who Are You Monsieur Gurdjieff?, Ren Zuber 1980

Gurdjieff, Louis Pauwels, 1964

The Self and I: Identity and the question "Who am I" in the Gurdjieff Work, Dimitri Peretzi, 2011, ISBN 978-960-99708-1-5

Gurdjieff and Hypnosis: A Hermeneutic Study, by Mohammad H. Tamdgidi, foreword by J. Walter Driscoll, Palgrave/Macmillan, 2009 (HC)/2012 (PB), ISBN 978-0230615076 (HC), ISBN 978-1137282439 (PB)

The Shadows of the Masters, Leonardo Vittorio Arena, ebook, 2013.

Comprehensive biographies Gurdjieff: Making a New World posthumous work by John G. Bennett, 1973, Harper, ISBN 0-06-060778-5 The Harmonious Circle: The Lives and Work of G. I. Gurdjieff, P. D. Ouspensky, and Their Followers by James Webb, 1980, Putnam Publishing. ISBN 0-399-11465-3 Gurdjieff: The anatomy of a Myth by James Moore, 1991, ISBN 1-86204-606-9 Gurdjieff's America: Mediating the Miraculous by Paul Beekman Taylor, 2004, Lighthouse Editions, ISBN 1-904998-00-3. Reissued as Gurdjieff's Invention of America 2007, Eureka Editions. G. I. Gurdjieff: A New Life by Paul Beekman Taylor, 2008, Eureka Editions, ISBN 978-90-72395-57-3

Music G.I. Gurdjieff Sacred Hymns, by Keith Jarrett, ECM, 1980 Seekers of the Truth: The Complete Piano Music of Georges I. Gurdjieff and Thomas de Hartmann, Volume One, by Cecil Lytle, Celestial Harmonies, 1992 Reading of a Sacred Book: The Complete Piano Music of Georges I. Gurdjieff and Thomas de Hartmann, Volume Two, by Cecil Lytle, Celestial Harmonies, 1992 Words for a Hymn to the Sun: The Complete Piano Music of Georges I. Gurdjieff and Thomas de Hartmann, Volume Three, by Cecil Lytle, Celestial Harmonies, 1992 Gurdjieff/deHartmann, piano music pianist Elsa Denzey, GFT (record label), 1998 Gurdjieff's Music for the Movements, by Wim van Dullemen, Channel Classics, 1999 Thomas de Hartmann: Music for Gurdjieff's '39 Series' , by Wim van Dullemen, Channel Classics, 2001 Chants, Hymns and Dances, by Anja Lechner and Vassilis Tsabropoulos, ECM, 2004 Melos, by Anja Lechner, Vassilis Tsabropoulos and U.T. Gandhi, ECM, 2008 The Way of the Sly Man, by Dave Morgan, Being Time, 2010 Music of Georges I. Gurdjieff, by Gurdjieff Folk Instruments Ensemble, ECM, 2011

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Gurdjieff - Rare Remarkable - YouTube

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November 28th, 2017 at 12:42 pm

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George Gurdjieff | OSHO | Meditation – Mindfulness and the …

Posted: October 17, 2017 at 12:52 am


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Gurdjieff said, You are nothing but the body, and when the body dies you will die. Only once in a while does a person survive one who has created soul in his life survives death not all. A Buddha survives; a Jesus survives, but not you! You will simply die, not even a trace will be left.

What was Gurdjieff trying to do? He was shocking you to the very roots; he was trying to take away all your consolations and foolish theories which go on helping you to postpone work upon yourself. Now, to tell people, You dont have any souls, you are just vegetables, just a cabbage or maybe a cauliflower a cauliflower is a cabbage with a college education but nothing more than that. He was really a master par excellence. He was taking the very earth away from underneath your feet. He was giving you such a shock that you had to think over the whole situation: are you going to remain a cabbage? He was creating a situation around you in which you would have to seek and search for the soul, because who wants to die?

And the idea that the soul is immortal has helped people to console themselves that they are not going to die, that death is just an appearance, just a long sleep, a restful sleep, and you will be born again. Gurdjieff says, All nonsense. This is all nonsense! Dead, you are dead forever unless you have created the soul.

Now see the difference: you have been told you are already a soul, and Gurdjieff changes it totally. He says, You are not already a soul, but only an opportunity. You can use it, you can miss it.

And I would like to tell you that Gurdjieff was just using a device. It is not true. Everybody is born with a soul. But what to do with people who have been using truths as consolations? A great master sometimes has to lie and only a great master has the right to lie just to pull you out of your sleep.

Osho,The Dhammapada: The Way of the Buddha, Vol. 2, Talk #2To continue reading,click here

Gurdjieff has been much criticized because he was a liar and the lying came from the Sufis; he was a Sufi. He was disciplined in Sufi monasteries and schools. And in the West, in fact, he introduced Sufism in this age in a totally new version. But then it was impossible for the ordinary Christian mind to understand him because truth is a value, and nobody can think that a master, an enlightened master, can lie.

Can you think of Jesus lying? And I know he lied but Christians cannot think about it: Jesus lying? No, he is the truest man. But then you dont know the question of knowledge is very, very dangerous. He lied about many things a master has to, if he wants to help. Otherwise, he can be a saint, but no help is possible from him. And without helping, a saint is already dead. If a saint cannot help, what is the use of his being here? There is no point in it. All that he can attain through life, he has attained. He is here to help.

Gurdjieff was very much criticized because the West couldnt understand, the ordinary Christian mind could not understand. So there are two versions about Gurdjieff in the West. One thinks that he was a very mischievous man not a sage at all, just a devil incarnate. Another is that he was the greatest saint the West has come to know in these past few centuries. Both are true, because he was just in the middle. He was a po personality. You cannot say yes, you cannot say no about him. You can say that he was a holy sinner, or a sinning saint. But you cannot divide, you cannot be so simple about him. The knowledge that he had was very complex.

Osho,Journey to the Heart, Talk #7To continue reading,click here

Gurdjieff says: Go on remembering the observer self-remembering. Buddha says: Forget the observer just watch the observed. If you have to choose between Buddha and Gurdjieff, I suggest choosing Buddha. There is a danger with Gurdjieff that you may become too self-conscious rather than becoming self-aware, you may become self-conscious, you may become an egoist. I have felt that in many Gurdjieff disciples, they have become very, very great egoists. Not that Gurdjieff was an egoist he was one of the rarest enlightened men of this age; but the method has a danger in it, it is very difficult to make a distinction between self-consciousness and self-remembering. It is so subtle it is almost impossible to make the distinction; for the ignorant masses it is almost always self-consciousness that will take possession of them; it will not be self-remembering.

The very word self is dangerous you become more and more settled in the idea of the self. And the idea of the self isolates you from existence.

Buddha says forget the self, because there is no self; the self is just in the grammar, in the language it is not anything existential. You just observe the content. By observing the content, the content starts disappearing. Once the content disappears, watch your anger and watching it, you will see it is disappearing once the anger has disappeared there is silence. There is no self, no observer, and nothing to be observed; there is silence. This silence is brought by Vipassana, Buddhas method of awareness.

Osho,This Very Body the Buddha, Talk #4To continue reading,click here

One old woman became very much impressed by Ouspensky, and then she went to see Gurdjieff. Within just a week she was back, and she told Ouspensky, I can feel that Gurdjieff is great, but I am not certain whether he is good or bad, whether he is evil, devilish, or a saint. I am not certain about that. He is great that much is certain. But he may be a great devil, or a great saint that is not certain. And Gurdjieff behaved in such a way that he would create this impression.

Alan Watts has written about Gurdjieff and has called him a rascal saint because sometimes he would behave like a rascal, but it was all acting and was done knowingly to avoid all those who would take unnecessary time and energy. It was done to send back those who could only work when they were certain. Only those would be allowed who could work even when they were not certain about the master, but who were certain about themselves.

And to surrender to a Gurdjieff will transform you more than surrendering to Ramana Maharshi, because Ramana Maharshi is so saintly, so simple, that surrender doesnt mean anything. You cannot do otherwise. He is so open just like a small child so pure, that surrender will happen. But that surrender is happening because of Ramana Maharshi, not because of you. It is nothing as far as you are concerned. If surrender happens with Gurdjieff, then it has happened because of you, because Gurdjieff is in no way going to support it. Rather, he will create all types of hindrances. If still you surrender, that transforms you. So there is no need to be absolutely sure about him and that is impossible but you have to be sure about yourself.

Osho,Vedanta: Seven Steps to Samadhi, Talk #5To continue reading,click here

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October 17th, 2017 at 12:52 am

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The Gurdjieff Society – About Gurdjieff

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Gurdjieff was born in Armenia around 1870. His first tutor was a priest and he also received a scientific education in surroundings and a way of life that had changed little for centuries. To his questions: Who am I? Why am I here? he found no answer either in religion or in science, but suspected that the truth lay hidden behind what had come down from the past in religious traditions and those strange myths and legends which he learned from his father, a traditional bard or 'ashokh'. With inspired like-minded companions, he set out to find in Asia and Africa the truth he sought, learning many languages, and acquiring many practical skills to earn the money for his journeys.

In 1912 he brought to Moscow an unknown teaching, a teaching that was neither a religion, nor a philosophy, but a practical teaching to be lived. He called this teaching 'The Fourth Way'. To follow the way he proposed, nothing is to be believed until verified by direct experience and life in the world is not to be renounced. It is a way in life, on which - gradually, for it cannot be done all at once - everything has to be questioned - one's beliefs, assumptions, attitudes, one's whole outlook on the life of man on this Earth.

Man is asleep, said Gurdjieff, he has no real consciousness or will. He is not free; to him, everything 'happens'. He can become conscious and find his true place as a human being in the creation, but this requires a profound transformation.

Gurdjieff calls us to awaken, telling us: "Man's possibilities are very great. You cannot even conceive a shadow of what man is capable of attaining. But nothing can be attained in sleep. In the consciousness of a sleeping man his illusions, his 'dreams' are mixed with reality. He lives in a subjective world and he can never escape from it. And this is the reason why he can never make use of all the powers he possesses and why he lives in only a small part of himself."

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The Gurdjieff Society - About Gurdjieff

Written by grays

October 17th, 2017 at 12:52 am

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Gurdjieff & Fourth Way – Watkins Books

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G.I. Gurdjieff (1866?-1949) was considered by some to be the greatest mystical teacher of all time, and by others to be a fraud. His liberation philosophy, commonly called "the Work," paved the way for now-conventional techniques of group and encounter therapy. He was born in Alexandropol, in the Russo-Turkish frontier, to Greek and Armenian parents. Although familiar with Madame Blavatsky's Theosophical Society, Gurdjieff preferred to devise his own occult teaching. He postulated that people are no more than machines run by forces outside their control. Human beings in such a state are essentially asleep. In order to wake up, they must work hard to penetrate their normal state of unconsciousness to reach the true consciousness inside.Gurdjieff's ultimate symbol for his worldview was the enneagram: a circle whose circumference is divided by nine points, yielding an uneven six-sided figure and a triangle. The enneagram shows the whole universe, and how people cross the intervals of development via shocks administered by a teacher. Gurdjieff claimed the enneagram was his alone, but it probably dates to a very similar figure drawn by Athanasius Kircher in 1665. Gurdjieff called his system the Fourth Way, or the Way of the Sly or Cunning Man. There were traditionally three paths to immortality: those of the fakir, the monk and the yogi. In the Fourth Way, however, people do not need to suffer physical, emotional, or intellectual tortures, but merely start from their own life experiences. They work on themselves as they are, trying to harmonise all paths and using every cunning trick they know to keep themselves "awake."

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Gurdjieff & Fourth Way - Watkins Books

Written by grays

October 17th, 2017 at 12:52 am

Posted in Gurdjieff


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