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Archive for the ‘Excercise’ Category

Ex-boyfriend charged after Kent student has ‘throat slit’ at busy shopping centre – The Independent

Posted: July 1, 2017 at 7:44 pm


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The ex-boyfriend of a 23-year-old student whosethroat was reportedly slit in a busy shopping centre car park has been charged on suspicion of murder.

Molly McLarenwas violently attackedat the Dockside factory outlet shopping centre in Chathamand died at the scene from stab wounds.

Joshua Stimpson, 25, of High Street in Wouldham in Rochester, was arrested at the scene and charged with her murder, Kent Policesaid.

Witnessesclaimed to have heard screams and the beeping of the car horn as Ms McLaren is believed to have been inside her carat the time of the attack.

Ms Stimpson is understood to have beenMs McLaren'sformer boyfriend but they relationship had reportedly come to an end.

Police said that "any previous reports made by the victim to Kent Police" regardingMr Stimpsonwould be considered as part of the murder investigation.

Officers have also referred the matter to the Independent Police Complaints Commissionwhich will determine whether another investigation into any previous contact withMs McLarenwould be necessary.

The 23-year-old was a student at the University of Kentstudying Sport and Excercise for Health and she worked at The Leather Bottle Pub in Gravesend, Kent Live reports.

A spokesman for the pub told the Kent newspaper he was "too upset" to comment at this time.

She was described as popular with "an infectious zest for life" and the desire to live happily and healthy.

Grieving students and staff at the university have been offered counselling to help them come to terms with Ms McLaren's shocking death.

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Ex-boyfriend charged after Kent student has 'throat slit' at busy shopping centre - The Independent

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July 1st, 2017 at 7:44 pm

Posted in Excercise

Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Emergency Excercise – whnt.com

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MORGAN COUNTY, Ala. - Today FEMA announced whether or not Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant passed its emergency exercise. The drill was held on Wednesday and it involved several local and state agencies. "What this drill is for is to test offsite and the onsite coordination for a possible release of radiation from a nuclear power plant," FEMA Branch Chief Randy Hecht said.

TVA wants to make sure everyone is safe in case of an emergency, which is why they prepare with rigorous emergency exercises. "The simulation held this week involved there being an incident at the plant. A simulated release was given, so there was evacuations to be coordinated, sheltering, communication, and traffic management,"Hecht said.

Hecht said Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant passed with flying colors. FEMA evaluates drill every two years, but Hecht said local responders conduct drills every year. "They have done an excellent job taking care of the community and working together as a unit,"Hecht said.

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Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Emergency Excercise - whnt.com

Written by grays

July 1st, 2017 at 5:44 am

Posted in Excercise

Colorado Avalanche Choosing Not to Qualify Mikhail Grigorenko is Tomfoolery – Mile High Sticking

Posted: June 27, 2017 at 3:42 pm


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Apr 4, 2017; Denver, CO, USA; Colorado Avalanche center Mikhail Grigorenko (25) and Chicago Blackhawks right wing Marian Hossa (81) battle for the puck during the third period at Pepsi Center. The Avalanche won 4-3 in overtime. Mandatory Credit: Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

Colorado Avalanche 2017 Draft: Analysis of Round 4 to 7 by Nadia Archuleta

According to areportfrom Mike Chambers of the Denver Post, the Colorado Avalanche are not going to extend Mikhail Grigorenko a qualifying offer. Thats nonsense. And, nonsense is starting to become the norm for Joe Sakic.

Let me make something very clear from the beginning. I do not think that Mikhail Grigorenko had a spot in the lineup next season. Hes a natural center, but mostly played wing in Colorado. However, his best performances were always when he was playing center, and the Avs have a current logjam at that position.

So, its likely he would have played wing again, and he hasnt show he can do that. He is a great third line center asset, but those are likely J.T. Comphers minutes for the foreseeable future. Hes also not a great skater, and thats probably what really hurt him with the current mold of the team.

Sure, he might not have had a spot in the lineup, but that doesnt change the fact that this was an excercise in stupidity.

In two years with the Colorado Avalanche, Grigorenko played 149 games, scored 50 points, was a -12 and averaged 14 minutes of ice time a night. He had a career year for 27 points in 2015-16, and a career high in goals at 10 in 2016-17. He averaged third line minutes, and he was just a bit below third line production.

Nonetheless, hes still also only 23 years old, and will be until the end of next season. Hes also a former No. 12 overall draft pick. And he averaged a 57.8 percent face-off percentage this year. Youre telling me that youre going to give all that up for free just because hes not the best skater?

Tomfoolery.

Maybe Grigs was asking for far too much money. Maybe the Avalanche cant find a spot for him in the lineup next year. And maybe there is even a chance that he is a pain in the ass as a locker room presence (I doubt it). Even if all three of those things were true, you cannot deny that this was another in a long list of boneheaded moves by Joe Sakic.

To give him away for free is ridiculous. Hes 23 years old didnt Sakic say something about getting younger? a former top 15 overall draft pick and has shown signs of improvement. He could be traded on his own for at least a fourth round pick and is definitely a good inclusion prospect to tip the trade scales.

Unfortunately, Sakic said sayonara, yet he extended Duncan Siemens ANOTHER QUALIFYING OFFER, this is insane!

Gabriel Bourque too! Sure, maybe it was money again, and Siemens and Bourque are cheaper to qualify. But, the organization hasnt really given Siemens much of an opportunity, and Bourque is an obvious constant AHLer. Grigorenko, on the other hand, has 217 games of NHL experience, and is still young.

I thought it was a mistake when he was exposed in the expansion draft, but this is an even bigger blunder.

Im going to bring it up again. I dont know if it has any merit, but it has to at least be considered.

What will Nikita Zadorov think of this decision?

We know that him leaving for the KHL is a possibility. What if Mikhail Grigorenko chooses to go play in the KHL (which, by the way, sources are reportingas a likelihood)? Is it not at least a bit of a possibility that Zadorov decides to take the moneyand play with his friend, in Russia?

Hes played his entire NHL career with Mikhail Grigorenko, that could be a contributing factor in his decision-making coming soon.

Finally, lets not forget the obvious. The Colorado Avalanche just gave up on one of the big assets they acquired in the Ryan OReilly trade. They didnt even get anything in return for parting ways.

My guess is that the Las Vegas Golden Knights choose to pick him up on the free agency market come July 1. That way they can get both of the assets they wanted during the expansion draft, Calvin Pickard and Mikhail Grigorenko.

Even if the Knights dont take him, you can bet that someone will count themselves blessed that hes essentially a free acquisition. Maybe it will even be the Buffalo Sabres.

Is anyone else infuriated by this news? I dont care if they didnt want him playing on their team anymore, hes an RFA with value and they gave him up FOR FREE.

Tomfoolery.

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Colorado Avalanche Choosing Not to Qualify Mikhail Grigorenko is Tomfoolery - Mile High Sticking

Written by grays

June 27th, 2017 at 3:42 pm

Posted in Excercise

It’s 120 degrees in Phoenix — and inmates at a local jail have to sleep outside – AOL

Posted: June 26, 2017 at 5:41 am


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Phoenix is in the middle of a devastating heat wave. Temperatures nearing 120 degrees grounded flights on Tuesday, and physicians are warning of health risks associated with the heat.

But for some inmates in Maricopa County, there is no other option but sleeping outside, even during a heat wave.

In 1993, former Maricopa County Sheriff and controversial Donald Trump surrogate Joe Arpaio erected "Tent City," an outdoor jail complex where inmates were housed in Korean War-era tents and forced to endure the harsh desert weather as part of their sentence, the New York Times reported. Arpaio once referred to Tent City as a "concentration camp."

In April, Arpaio's newly elected successor, Sheriff Paul Penzone, announced that the Tent City complex would shut down after years of criticism from human rights advocates. But months later even after reports that Tent City had been dismantled there are still inmates forced to sleep outside in tents even as the temperatures soar.

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Maricopa County 'Tent City'

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PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate rests on his bunk at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: Immigrant inmates are served milk at breakfast at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are the standard daily breakfast at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

One of the guard towers and the camoflauged fence is seen surrounding Sheriff Joe Arpaio's Maricopa County 'tent city' on May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. This area of the tent city houses misdemeanor offenders. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: A Protestant minister greets immigrant inmates at church service at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: Immigrant inmates eat breakfast at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate prepares breakfast at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are the standard daily breakfast at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: Immigrant inmates walk for excercise at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate reads on his bunk at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate walks for excercise at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant barber cuts a fellow inmate's hair at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: A Protestant minister greets immigrant inmates at church service at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate enters his tent at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate rests on his bunk at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate prepares breakfast at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are the standard daily breakfast at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate walks to the bathroom at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: Immigrant inmates line up for breakfast at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate walks for excercise at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: An immigrant inmate sits on his bunk at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX, AZ - MARCH 11: Immigrant inmates excercise at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. Striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

An inmate held inside Sheriff Joe Arpaio's Maricopa County 'tent city' walks in the housing area May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. This area of the tent city houses misdemeanor offenders. In August, 1993, Arpaio started the nation?s largest Tent City for convicted inmates. Two thousand convicted men and women serve their sentences in a canvas incarceration compound. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Detention Officer Rene Ansley holds up the uniform worn by 'unsentenced imates' inside Sheriff Joe Arpaio's Maricopa County 'tent city' May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. In August, 1993, Arpaio started the nation?s largest Tent City for convicted inmates. Two thousand convicted men and women serve their sentences in a canvas incarceration compound. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Detention Officers escort female imates inside Sheriff Joe Arpaio's Maricopa County 'tent city' May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. This area of the tent city houses misdemeanor offenders. In August, 1993, Arpaio started the nation?s largest Tent City for convicted inmates. Two thousand convicted men and women serve their sentences in a canvas incarceration compound. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

An unoccupied area of Sheriff Joe Arpaio's Maricopa County 'tent city' is seen behind a locked gate May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. This area of the tent city houses misdemeanor offenders. In August, 1993, Arpaio started the nation?s largest Tent City for convicted inmates. Two thousand convicted men and women serve their sentences in a canvas incarceration compound. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Inmate Christopher Lee, 32 jailed for drug possession works in the stables for abused horses inside Sheriff Joe Arpaio's Maricopa County 'tent city' May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. In August, 1993, Arpaio started the nation?s largest Tent City for convicted inmates. Two thousand convicted men and women serve their sentences in a canvas incarceration compound. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

An inmate held inside Sheriff Joe Arpaio's Maricopa County 'tent city' jail carries his laundry May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. This area of the tent city houses misdemeanor offenders. In August, 1993, Arpaio started the nation?s largest Tent City for convicted inmates. Two thousand convicted men and women serve their sentences in a canvas incarceration compound. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Maricopa Country Detention Officer Rene Ansley holds up one of the pink boxer style underware male inmates wear inside Sheriff Joe Arpaio's tent city jail May 3, 2010, in Phoenix, Arizona. The inmates also have matching pink socks. This area of the tent city houses misdemeanor offenders. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

PHOENIX - APRIL 30: Undocumented immigrant Jose Hechavaria (R), 43, stands with fellow prisoners in the yard of the Maricopa County Tent City Jail on April 30, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona. Hechavaria, a 13-year resident of Arizona, said he was arrested by sheriff's deputies on a DUI charge and then held because of his illegal immigration statues. Some 200 undocumented immigrants are currently serving time in the facility. The controversial jail is run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who has been an outspoken critic of illegal immigration and a supporter of Arizona's new tough immigration law. Prisoners at the facility are fed twice a day, sleep in non-airconditioned tents and are issued striped prison uniforms and pink underwear and socks. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX - APRIL 30: Undocumented immigrants play cards in their tent at the Maricopa County Tent City Jail on April 30, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona. Some 200 undocumented immigrants are currently serving time in the facility, and most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentence. The controversial jail is run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who has been an outspoken critic of illegal immigration and a supporter of Arizona's new tough immigration law. Prisoners at the facility are fed twice a day, sleep in non-airconditioned tents and are issued striped prison uniforms and pink underwear and socks. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

PHOENIX - APRIL 30: Undocumented immigrants sleep in their tent at the Maricopa County Tent City Jail on April 30, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona. Some 200 undocumented immigrants are currently serving time in the facility, and most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentence. The controversial jail is run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who has been an outspoken critic of illegal immigration and a supporter of Arizona's new tough immigration law. Prisoners at the facility are fed twice a day, sleep in non-airconditioned tents and are issued striped prison uniforms and pink underwear and socks. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

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Joaquin Enriquez, a spokesperson for the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office, said in an email Tuesday that while the "last tent at Tent City did go down" and about 400 inmates were relocated to indoor facilities, there are still 380 inmates remaining in the "con-tents," a part of the outdoor jail complex that houses people on work furlough.

Those 380 inmates leave "to work at their regular jobs" during the day and come back to sleep in the tents at night, Enriquez said.

Plans are still on track to fully shut down the outdoor jail, including the "con-tents," within six months of Sheriff Penzone's April announcement. But for now, inmates are still sleeping in outdoor tents during a brutal heat wave.

"During times like these high heat warnings inmates and detention officers are given unlimited access to ice water," Enriquez said, adding that officers pay "close attention" to the condition of inmates.

"If an inmate develops a medical condition due to heat or any other factor, the individual is transferred to Correctional Health Services," Enriquez said.

For local prisoners' rights advocates, the fact that people are being kept outside in the heat is concerning.

"We have always opposed the tent facility, for a lot of reasons, including health reasons," Donna Leone Hamm, the director of Arizona prisoners' rights advocacy group Middle Ground Prison Reform, said in a phone call Tuesday.

"Even though most of these folks may be leaving during the day and coming back at night, it's still 95 degrees at night," Hamm said.

She raised concerns that the extreme heat could be dangerous for anyone with a medical condition that could be worsened by the weather. And even for "a healthy adult male who has no other medical problems, who is drinking and staying hydrated completely," the "oppressive" heat would still feel uncomfortable, she said.

Hamm said that despite the sheriff's office's assertion that inmates are given unlimited access to water, the county is "risking a lot of liability" by exposing so many people to the heat.

Her organization is hopeful that the last remaining tent facilities will shut down along the timeline that Penzone promised in April.

"When the new sheriff came into office, we were very pleased to see that he was immediately intending on getting rid of the tents," Hamm said.

"I wish they would have just wholesale closed them down, but we're willing to accept that he is moving forward to do that ... I would hope that this heat wave would be the incentive."

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It's 120 degrees in Phoenix -- and inmates at a local jail have to sleep outside - AOL

Written by simmons

June 26th, 2017 at 5:41 am

Posted in Excercise

Sycamore Park District back in expansion mode with community center – DeKalb Daily Chronicle

Posted: June 24, 2017 at 8:41 pm


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SYCAMORE What a difference two years makes.

Two years ago, the Sycamore Park District closed its building on Fair Street because of budget constraints. The superintendent of recreation's position was elimiminated. Fewer recreational programs were offered.

On Wednesday, the district announced the hire of a new superintendent of recreation, Meghan Jourden-Messerich, who is scheduled to begin work July 17 with an annual salary of $76,500, executive director Dan Gibble said. She is currently an assistant superintendent of recreation for the St. Charles Park District.

Fitness facilities and classes and an indoor jogging track are some of the features the district plans to offer when its new community center is complete about 10 months from now.

"We've been in a scaled-back situation since [closing the Fair Street building]," Gibble said. "Now, we're going to be back in expansion phase, and we need someone with good experience managing those facilities."

Jourden-Messerich's duties will include staffing, scheduling and organizing programs offered in the new community center space, such as dance, fitness, arts and crafts and tumbling classes.

Gibble said a community-wide survey indicated strong interest from adults and older individuals for indoor excercise facilities, such as a place to walk or jog during extreme cold or heat.

The 22,400-square-foot community center is projected to open about 10 months from now, barring construction delays, with concrete walls already beginning to form the building on the site of the future recreation campus along Airport Road.

The next major step in the community center construction will be adding structural steel and panels to form the roof shortly after the Fourth of July, Gibble said.

The recreation campus will also include a dog park, splash pad, sled hill and an outdoor ampitheater and patio. Those features, along with other ACTION 2020 projects a new golf course irrigation system, bike path extensions and sports complex expansion are being funded by about $9 million in property taxes, $3 million in grants and $1 million in donations.

The district is now about $32,000 short of its $1 million fundraising goal in the Leaf a Legacy campaign, Gibble said.

The community center should be the first ACTION 2020 feature open for public use in March or April 2018, followed by the splash pad that summer, he said.

The dog park is tentatively scheduled for fall '18 and the sled hill for winter '18 or '19, but their openings will depend on the turf having enough time to settle so that it is ready for heavy activity, Gibble said.

Live updates to construction on the recreation campus are posted to the Sycamore Park District website.

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Sycamore Park District back in expansion mode with community center - DeKalb Daily Chronicle

Written by grays

June 24th, 2017 at 8:41 pm

Posted in Excercise

Hospital staff ‘rise to challenge’ in chemical spill exercise at Hull Royal Infirmary – Hull Daily Mail

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A "major incident training exercise" that took place in Hull on Saturday has been hailed successful.

Called Exercise Orange Falcon, the test run was organised by the Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust, alongside crews from the police, fire service and ambulance staff.

The "scenario" created was said to be a "lorry crash with potential chemicals involved".

It saw Humberside Fire and Rescue Service, St John Ambulance Service and Humberside Police all at the scene at the Army Reserve Centre, Londesborough Barracks, in Londesborough Street, Hull.

"Casualties involved also descended on Hull Royal Infirmary to test the hospitals response to a major emergency.

Mock decontamination arrangements then got underway at the hospital following the "crash".

Around 40 casualties were made up with fake wounds as part of the excercise.

Makani Purva, deputy chief medical officer at HEY NHS Trust, said: "What we have seen today is a decontamination exercise.

"We have had an accident where there have been people who have been immersed in a contaminated liquid and from the accident site we capture the journey of the patients and how they were managed by the various agencies who were involved in it.

"We have about ten organisations who were involved in it, taking you right from the incident side all the way into the main hospital."

Mr Purva said it has been a real learning process for those involved.

"They key factor in patient safety is excellent communication so what we have learnt today is that we need to improve even better all our communication skills, not just between individuals and between departments in an organisation but between organisations as well.

"That has been a key underlining message that we have learnt."

Ms Purva said although the exercise was not related to recent tragedies, it is reassuring that it has taken place.

"On the one hand it was mandatory but I think it is very reassuring considering the recent incidents that have happened around the UK and the world that what we are doing today in Hull has put us in a good position to look after not only our patients but also the people who live in this area," she said.

"We were able to free up dozens of beds very quickly, we had enough surgeons with enough nursing staff who could have easily looked after these patients so it demonstrated to you how well we have performed as an organisation in rising to such a challenge."

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Hospital staff 'rise to challenge' in chemical spill exercise at Hull Royal Infirmary - Hull Daily Mail

Written by grays

June 24th, 2017 at 8:41 pm

Posted in Excercise

NFL star joins volunteer effort for new playground – Sun Sentinel

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Miami Dolphins wide receiver Jarvis Landry recently teamed up with 180 volunteers to build a playground in Middle River Terrace Park.

In just six hours, the volunteer group constructed a 2,500-square-foot playground from the ground up. It contains 14 components such as a triple racer slide, monorail and a cozy cocoon.

The outdoor zone gives 3,000 neighborhood kids have a safe place to enjoy the fresh air and excercise. Previously, the closest playground was across a busy arterial and nearly a mile away.

Landry kicked off the work party with his mom, Dietra Landry. Building a play space has a personal connection for Jarvis. As a kid, he spent many hours playing football at a local park. It kept him off the streets and out of trouble, he said.

The playground was built in partnership with Landry, the city parks department, Middle River Terrace Neighborhood Association, Target and KaBOOM!, a national non-profit that provides play areas for kids.

Target's district team leader Alexandra Slaton said KaBOOM! met with residents in the neighborhood to gather their input on the playground's design last spring. It took another eight weeks to formalize the plans.

Fort Lauderdale Mayor Jack Seiler, commissioner Dean J. Trantalis, assistant city manager Stanley Hawthorne and parks and recreation director Phil Thornburg were on hand to dedicate the new space located at 1329 NE 7th Ave. in Fort Lauderdale.

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NFL star joins volunteer effort for new playground - Sun Sentinel

Written by simmons

June 24th, 2017 at 8:41 pm

Posted in Excercise

Temperatures to hit 30s on parts of Vancouver Island this weekend – CTV Vancouver Island

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CTV Vancouver Island Published Friday, June 23, 2017 10:22AM PDT Last Updated Friday, June 23, 2017 6:23PM PDT

Temperatures will push into the low 30s on inland and eastern Vancouver Island this weekend as a heat wave scorches areas across B.C.s South Coast.

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for Metro Vancouver, Fraser Valley, Howe Sound, Whistler and the eastern and inland island, saying a strong upper ridge of high pressure building over the province will result in a heat wave.

It expects record-high temperatures will be broken in some areas over the weekend.

The current forecast says temperatures in the Port Alberni area will hit 32 degrees Saturday and a scorching 34 degrees on Sunday.

On the east side of the island, the weather statement was extended from Courtenay to Campbell River, Duncan to Nanaimo and Nanoose Bay to Fanny Bay.

On the South Island itll be a little cooler, but Victoria is still in for a sunny weekend of roughly 28-degree weather, according to Environment Canada.

Temperatures will start to dip again on Monday due to an onshore flow of cool, marine air.

Environment Canada is warning residents that the heat could pose risks for young kids, pregnant women, older adults, people with chronic illnesses and people who work or excercise outdoors.

Those at risk should be aware of the symptoms of heat illness, which can include swelling, rashes, cramps, fainting, heat exhaustion or stroke.

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Temperatures to hit 30s on parts of Vancouver Island this weekend - CTV Vancouver Island

Written by admin

June 24th, 2017 at 8:41 pm

Posted in Excercise

WTXL Road Trip: Exploring Monticello’s "Haunted" History – WTXL ABC 27

Posted: June 23, 2017 at 9:43 am


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Video Gallery - WTXL Video Template

MONTICELLO, Fla. (WTXL) - Historic Monticello Florida. It's a charming small town, and a place where history and heresay collide.

Much to the delight of many a superstitious tourist, history buff, or supernatural hobbyist, Monticello is widely regarded as one of the most haunted small towns in the South.

It is a haven for people like Betty Davis, who founded Big Bend Ghost Trackers. When Davis describes her life, she talks about a string of otherworldly encounters, conversations with ghosts, and psychic experiences. She got "Ghost Trackers" off the ground because she wanted people like her, who believe in a thin veil between our lives and the afterlife, to have a place to gather without judgement and search for hauntings in their communities.

It's also difficult to walk through the cells in the Old Jefferson County Jail, which housed prisoners from the turn of the century until the 1970s, without getting goose flesh.

The building's brick screams truths at historians, demanding more research when the building was originally thought to be a mere 90 years old. Anne Holt, a local historian who published her doctoral dissertation on correctional history, says "You can feel the weight of the years in an old building. A lot of old hard things have happened here."

When you walk through the cells, the floor crackles under your step, chipped paint littering the aging floors. White bricks in the inmate "excercise" area bear notes from prisoners. They bear witness with words like "Disturbed," and ominous phrases like, "I need someone to talk to me about my soul," scrolled over the walls in penmanship no longer taught in schools.

Just a short walk away is the John Denham house. A Bed and Breakfast now, it was originally the home of the Scottish business man whose name it bears. The place is allegedly haunted by the ghost of a former occupant. A school marm named Sarah. Childless and kind, guests report that Sarah helps pat their children to sleep, and tucks adult visitors in at night. Owner Pat Inman says guests have similar experiences, and having never met or talked will recount the same stories after staying in Sarah's room (now appropriately nicknamed the "blue room" describing the color splashed on the walls).

Inman says she first learned the house might be haunted from strangers, and finds the folklore a fun and family friendly feature for her establishment. "Every B&B should have a ghost or two, and we have a ghost or two." She says with a warm smile.

John Denham house is one of fourteen stops on the Historic Monticello Ghost Tour. It is clear the tours are held for entertainment value, and the guides (including Betty Davis) dress in period clothing. The tours are just one way that visitors to the town can take a stroll through allegedly haunted town, blurring the lines between fear and fun and bringing money in to the Jefferson County town.

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WTXL Road Trip: Exploring Monticello's "Haunted" History - WTXL ABC 27

Written by admin

June 23rd, 2017 at 9:43 am

Posted in Excercise

Get in, get wet in Hernando County – Hernando Sun

Posted: June 22, 2017 at 11:41 am


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Rogers Park

7244 Shoal Line Blvd, Spring Hill, FL 34607 OPEN 24/7

Rogers Park is a 3 -acre county park located on the Weeki Wachee River. Amenities include a boat ramp, canoe launch, swimming area, showers, seasonal lifeguards, observation deck, restrooms, picnic tables and shelter, playground, barbecue grills and a volleyball court. There are also restaurants nearby, so if you dont pack a picnic lunch you could find a meal at the Riverside Restaurant across the street or at Upper Deck across the river. Riverside is a casual diner and Upper Deck is a Bar and Grill style restaurant that overlooks the river. There is a parking fee for the Rogers Park lot. If youre looking for a spot to play around in the crystal clear, sandy bottom Weeki Wachee River, Rogers Park is your best bet.

1300 Mariner Boulevard Spring Hill, FL 34609

The pool at the YMCA is an 8-lane Junior Olympic-size heated pool (domed in the winter). The YMCA provides swim lessons, family swim, lap swim and water excercise opportunities. It is best to check their schedule so that you go at the correct time for the activity youd like to participate in. The YMCA offers a variety of monthly membership options. The pool opens at 5:30AM and closes at 9:30PM Monday through Friday. Saturday hours are 7AM to 5:30PM and Sunday hours are 12-5PM. Go to https://www.ymcasuncoast.org for additional information.

10800 Pine Island Dr, Weeki Wachee, FL 34607 Open 8AM - 8PM

The Alfred McKethan/Pine Island Beach Park is located on the Gulf of Mexico and is the only beach in the county. The water gradually gets deeper so you can walk out quite a ways. During some tides you can wade to nearby islands. The park abuts salt marshes which serve as an estuary for many animals. Small fish are plentiful and there are many blue crabs that scurry along bottom. There are also areas where there are sea grasses. To get out to the beach park, you drive across a 2 and a half mile causeway through the saltmarshes, which is a beautiful drive. The three acre park can accommodate a little over a hundred cars. Besides the beach, the park has a concession stand, restrooms, picnic tables, bbq grills, and a volleyball court. The park fills up quickly on a nice day, so if you would like to be assured of a place to park you have to arrive early. The park is open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m and parking costs $5. Remember that the Gulf of Mexico can get quite warm in the summer months, so you may want to stop at Rogers Park for a refreshing dip in the river after your beach day.

6131 Commercial Way, Spring Hill, FL 34606 Open daily from 9am to 5:30pm.

Buccaneer Bay is located within Weeki Wachee Springs State Park. There are several slides, a lazy river run and a free swim area. Lifeguards are on duty in the swimming area. All activities are open daily for the summer through August 13th. You can bring a picnic lunch or eat at the concessions within the park. The water park is free with admission to the state park. Tube rentals are extra. They do not allow grilling or cooking within the park since it is a state park. Buccaneer Bay is very busy on weekends. The waterslides close 30 minutes prior to park closing. Tube rental rates: Single Inner Tube: $8 Double Tube: $12 Triple Tube: $15

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Get in, get wet in Hernando County - Hernando Sun

Written by grays

June 22nd, 2017 at 11:41 am

Posted in Excercise


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