Page 179«..1020..176177178179

Archive for the ‘Zen’ Category

BBpics Presents Zen Body Foods with: CODY MANNIX – Video

Posted: September 30, 2014 at 10:42 am


without comments


BBpics Presents Zen Body Foods with: CODY MANNIX
CODY MANNIX For Zen Body Foods Zen Body Foods Health Food Restaurant 6152 126th Ave Largo, FL 33773 Phone:(727) 543-2843 http://www.zenbodyfoods.com.

By: BBPics Photography

View original post here:

BBpics Presents Zen Body Foods with: CODY MANNIX - Video

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen

Spot N2 : Haaxi, la mascotte du Domaine Zen Art’Titude – Video

Posted: at 10:42 am


without comments


Spot N2 : Haaxi, la mascotte du Domaine Zen Art #39;Titude
Spot N2 de prsentation du Domaine Zen Art #39;Titude Chambre d #39;htes de prestige / Galerie d #39;Art: "Haaxi la mascotte du Domaine" http://domaine-zenarttitude.fr Publicity N2 for A luxury...

By: Kim KIMBERLY

Here is the original post:

Spot N2 : Haaxi, la mascotte du Domaine Zen Art'Titude - Video

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen

The Wine Zen Tastes the Torbreck The Factor 2010 – Video

Posted: at 10:42 am


without comments


The Wine Zen Tastes the Torbreck The Factor 2010
The Wine Zen tastes the Torbreck Factor Barossa Valley 2010.

By: Jonathan Cheah

More here:

The Wine Zen Tastes the Torbreck The Factor 2010 - Video

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen

Teach Zen To Play : Yu-Gi-Oh Zexal World Duel Carnival [ Part 2 ] [ BEATING ON A DOG] – Video

Posted: at 10:42 am


without comments


Teach Zen To Play : Yu-Gi-Oh Zexal World Duel Carnival [ Part 2 ] [ BEATING ON A DOG]
This is a playthrough of Yu-Gi-Oh! ZEXAL World Duel Carnival for the 3DS! I don #39;t know much about the story or the gameplay of this game, but I #39;m willing to learn, so please let me know how...

By: Zen And Cyrrene

See the article here:

Teach Zen To Play : Yu-Gi-Oh Zexal World Duel Carnival [ Part 2 ] [ BEATING ON A DOG] - Video

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen

Zen – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Posted: at 10:42 am


without comments

Zen is a school of Mahayana Buddhism[note 1] that developed in China during the 6th century as Chn. From China, Zen spread south to Vietnam, northeast to Korea and east to Japan.

The word Zen is derived from the Japanese pronunciation of the Middle Chinese word (djen) (pinyin: Chn), which in turn is derived from the Sanskrit word dhyna, which can be approximately translated as "absorption" or "meditative state".

Zen emphasizes insight into Buddha-nature and the personal expression of this insight in daily life, especially for the benefit of others. As such, it de-emphasizes mere knowledge of sutras and doctrine and favors direct understanding through zazen and interaction with an accomplished teacher.

The teachings of Zen include various sources of Mahyna thought, especially Yogcra, the Tathgatagarbha Sutras and Huayan, with their emphasis on Buddha-nature, totality, and the Bodhisattva-ideal. The Prajpramit literature and, to a lesser extent, Madhyamaka have also been influential.

The history of Chn in China can be divided in several periods. Zen as we know it today is the result of a long history, with many changes and contingent factors. Each period had different types of Zen, some of which remained influential while others vanished.

Ferguson distinguishes three periods from the 5th century into the 13th century:

Although McRae has reservations about the division of Chn-history in phases or periods, he nevertheless distinguishes four phases in the history of Chn:

Neither Ferguson nor McRae give a periodisation for Chinese Chn following the Song-dynasty, though McRae mentions

When Buddhism came to China from India, it was initially adapted to the Chinese culture and understanding. Buddhism was exposed to Confucianist and Taoist influences. Goddard quotes D.T. Suzuki,[note 4] calling Chn a "natural evolution of Buddhism under Taoist conditions." Buddhism was first identified to be "a barbarian variant of Taoism":

Judging from the reception by the Han of the Hinayana works and from the early commentaries, it appears that Buddhism was being perceived and digested through the medium of religious Daoism (Taoism). Buddha was seen as a foreign immortal who had achieved some form of Daoist nondeath. The Buddhists mindfulness of the breath was regarded as an extension of Daoist breathing exercises.

Read this article:

Zen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen

Zen in Buddhism Introduction (What Is It?)

Posted: at 10:42 am


without comments

You've heard of Zen. You may have had moments of Zen. But what the bleep is Zen?

The popular idea of Zen is that it's, like, Japanese Dada, with kung fu monks. I regret that the popular idea is a tad romanticized.

The nerdy answer to the question What is Zen? is that Zen is a school of Mahayana Buddhism that emerged in China about 15 centuries ago. In China it is called "Ch'an" Buddhism. Ch'an is the Chinese rendering of the Sanskrit word dhyana, which refers to a mind absorbed in meditation. "Zen" is the Japanese rendering of Ch'an. Zen is called "Thien" in Vietnam and "Seon" in Korea. In any language, the name could be translated "Meditation Buddhism."

Here I want to provide a bare-bones introduction to Zen. Note that what follows is barely a handshake. I will use the word "Zen" for all schools, just to keep it simple.

This article also assumes you know what Buddhism is. If you aren't sure, read the Introduction to Buddhism.

Zen began to emerge as a distinctive school of Mahayana Buddhism when the Indian sage Bodhidharma (ca. 470-543) taught at the Shaolin Monastery of China. (Yes, it's a real place, and yes, there is a historic connection between kung fu and Zen.) To this day Bodhidharma is called the First Patriarch of Zen.

Bodhidharma's teachings tapped into some developments already in progress, such as the confluence of philosophical Taoism with Buddhism. Taoism so profoundly impacted early Zen that some philosophers and texts are claimed by both religions. The early Mahayana philosophies of Madhyamika (ca. 2nd century CE) and Yogacara (ca. 3rd century CE) also played huge roles in the development of Zen.

Under the Sixth Patriarch, Huineng (638-713), Zen shed most of its vestigial Indian trappings, becoming more Chinese and more, well, Zennish. Some consider Huineng, not Bodhidharma, to be the true father of Zen. His personality and influence are felt in Zen to this day.

Huineng's tenure was at the beginning of what is still called the Golden Age of Zen. This Golden Age flourished during the same period as China's Tang Dynasty, 618-907. The masters of this Golden Age still speak to us through koans and stories.

During these years Zen organized itself into five "houses," or five schools. Two of these, called in Japanese the Rinzai and the Soto schools, still exist and remain distinctive from each other.

The rest is here:

Zen in Buddhism Introduction (What Is It?)

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen

Words related to zen – Urban Dictionary: zen

Posted: at 10:42 am


without comments

The belief of no faith began its existence with Buddhism, the "father" of Zen. Buddhism began with a prince named Siddhartha (Vetanen 1). Siddhartha was born close to five hundred B.C. (Vetanen 1). After having lived twenty-nine years and experiencing life in the world, the soon-to-be-enlightened one left his child and martial partner in order to dedicate the rest of his life towards becoming enlightened (Vetanen 1). At the age of thirty-five, Siddhartha attained Enlightenment under the fabled Bo tree and became Buddha, or "The Enlightened One" (Vetanen 1). Although Buddhas body died later, his spirit lived on and went into the next person that needs a soul (i.e. people that are being conceived. Many Zen thinkers say that Zen was initiated once Buddha achieved Enlightenment (Watts 24). Other Zen masters think of Bodidharma as the "founder" of the most popular Japanese form of Buddhism (Watts 24). Bodidharmas name means "law of wisdom" (Keiji 10). The first Zen Buddhist was the leader of a Buddhist sect that later became Zen around 470 A.D. (Vetanen 1). Although there is doubt as to who officially began Zen, the definition of Zen remains the same.

The closest translation for Zen is contemplation (Watts 22). This conversion is not the most accurate of versions, as the most accurate version for Zen is Enlightenment and its methods of achievement (Watts 24). Zen was once called Chan (Vetanen 1). Chan is a belief of impermanence, meaning that those who practice Zen do not value their earthly possessions as much as one who does not have this belief of impermanence (Walter 1). Zen masters use language to make their difficult to understand (Keiji 11). For this reason and others, Zen is difficult to understand. Zen can be defined as a sect of Buddhists that is more lenient than other sects (Ross 139). Followers of Zen believe in Karma. Karma is thought of as natures "cause and effect" system (Aitken 2). However Zen is defined, one must learn the spiritual meaning of Zen without aid through meditation (Vetanen 2).

The spiritual meaning of Zen must be interpreted individually because it is not a simple answer to a question, and cannot be answered by any Zen master (Vetanen 2). It is difficult to comprehend Zen because those who are not enlightened have minds that make Zens meaning out to be much more difficult to understand than the true simplicity of the belief (Watts 52). "With our eyes on the horizon, we do not see what lies at our feet," (Watts 46) is a Zen explanation for the reason of Chans difficulty of comprehension. To become enlightened in Zen, one must merely remove the doubt that he is not enlightened. To fully understand Zen, meditation is more important than explanation, for Zen is a philosophy in which a Ch'an practitioner must learn on his own. The question of the belief of no faith can be asked in many different ways (Walter 1). The question can range from the age old, "What is the sound of one hand clapping?" to others such as, "What is the nature of the mind?" (Walter 1) Zen must be comprehended, not explained (Ross 143). Those who are Zen masters say that Chan is to go with existence without attempting to stop or hinder its course (Watts 52). To practice Chan, it is necessary to understand how to meditate.

There are two basic forms of contemplation: Shamatha and Vipshayana (Walter 2). Shanmatha contemplation is a preparatory measure for Vipshayana meditation. During Shanmatha contemplation, a contemplator attempts to recognize the stream of consciousness, without trying to manipulate or interrupt it. This prepares the body for Vipshayana contemplation, in which the meditator must not be interrupted by any other thoughts. Vipshayana contemplation is the type of contemplation with which one may find Enlightenment (Walter 2). There is also a type of meditation called Zazen. Zazen is practiced while seated, and the contemplator must notice his breathing without trying to alter its natural pattern (Walter 2). Zazen is much like Shanmatha meditation, in that one must recognize the bodys actions without interrupting in any way. When a Zen practitioner contemplates, the meditation affects the practitioners normal memory (Aitken 1). It is difficult to explain the entire process of meditation, as it is difficult to explain Zens true meaning.

The ancient religion of the samurai is not in fact a true religion by definition, as the practitioner of Zen does not worship any god, but, in essence, worships the bodys complexity, especially the complexity of the mind. The belief of no faith is an assimilation of many other religions from the East. Since the religion began in Japan, it shows the Japanese ability to borrow cultural aspects of other cultures and incorporate it seamlessly with Japanese culture. It is difficult for anyone who does not wish to accept Zen Buddhism to understand the deeper meaning of this religion. But anyone who embraces the belief of the belief of no faith has a good chance of achieving Enlightenment.

By Jordan Clark

What is Mind? No Matter. What is Matter? Never Mind.

See the rest here:

Words related to zen - Urban Dictionary: zen

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen

Zen and other arts of gifting

Posted: at 10:42 am


without comments

Tray Art

Amaya, Race Course

Telephone: 98946-83225

If you want to spread some love and Zen this festive season, here is your chance to do so. Simran Wahan has drawn and hand-painted wooden trays using an art form called Zentangle. This is a meditative art form and usually done in black and white. Simran has trained in this art form and is also training others in it. Besides the black-and-white art works, she has also done freehand floral and abstract designs on trays, such as the Sunflower series, Egyptian and Japanese motifs and attractive doodles. Simran will also personalise the trays for you with your choice of colours and patterns. The trays come in three sizes and start at Rs. 450 per tray.

Lit up

Divyalok

Telephone: 94431-51037

Karen Shetty has come up with a range of candles for this season. She has a special for Deepavali; a small candle with a mirrored candle holder. It is shaped like a lotus. When the candle is lit, the flame is reflected in the mirrors, almost like a kaleidoscope. Karen makes candles only on prior order. She needs at least two days notice.

Body beautiful

Juicy Chemistry

View original post here:

Zen and other arts of gifting

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen

The Zen of Spin

Posted: at 10:42 am


without comments

If you took undergraduate quantum mechanics, at some point you were introduced to the concept of "spin." If you're like me, you left that class feeling you were shown a magic trick but not how it worked. Dont worry; you are not alone. The reason you weren't told more is not that a better explanation was left for graduate quantum mechanics. You weren't told more because there isn't a lot more to know.

Of course, there is the magnetic dipole moment. Shoot a beam of electrons through a magnetic field with a gradient, and the beam will bend thanks to the influence of the field on a moving charge. Furthermore, it will also split into two sub-beams -- one containing "spin-up" electrons and the other containing "spin-down" electrons. An oriented magnetic dipole moment in the macro world corresponds to circulating current. Hence, the image of a spinning electron, presumably with a non-uniformly distributed charge that gives rise to the magnetic moment.

But if you do the math with some sort of estimate of electron size, the charge has to be spinning at many times the speed of light, which is not possible. Actually, it's not clear the electron actually has a size, so what is spinning anyway? Not that the spin isn't real -- you can induce electron spin transitions in an atom with polarized light, and photon spin (circular polarization) is real. But the intuitive explanation for the dipole moment is completely wrong, and we still don't have any concept of just what is spinning.

When we dig deeper, we learn that electrons -- like most familiar particles -- have a spin of . I'm sorry, of what? Physicists, when confused, look at symmetries to understand behavior. A common example is rotational symmetry. A simple square rotated through 90 degrees looks identical to the un-rotated square. The same applies to 180 degree, 270 degree, and 360 degree rotations. Virtually everything looks the same if you rotate it through 360 degrees -- it's like no rotation at all.

But not spins of . Those you have to rotate through 720 degrees to get back to where you started, which is where the comes from -- a spin of 2 is rotationally symmetric at 180 degrees, a spin of 1 at 360 degrees, and a spin of at 720 degrees.

A neat trick to demonstrate this type of rotational symmetry (and a way to celebrate your inner geek at parties) is something called the plate-trick. Lay a plate flat on your hand, and then rotate it under your arm, over your head, and back down to the original position, all the time keeping the plate flat. If you watch carefully, you will notice that you rotated the plate through 720 degrees -- the same kind of rotational symmetry as spin . So we've discovered a real-world, albeit contrived, example.

But what does this mean for electrons? If you rotate polarized electrons through 360 degrees, why isn't that the same as no rotation? In fact, it is almost the same, but the sign of the wave function reverses -- you have to rotate through 720 degrees to get back to exactly the same wave function. The sign reversal has no observable effect if you're just looking at the intensity of the beam, but it can be seen in the circular polarization of light emitted from atoms excited by the electrons. Here again, spin behavior is, at best, on the fringes of intuition.

To Page 2

Original post:

The Zen of Spin

Written by simmons

September 30th, 2014 at 10:42 am

Posted in Zen


Page 179«..1020..176177178179