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Archive for the ‘Osho’ Category

Finished Tiger King? 7 shows you should watch next on Netflix and Amazon Prime – TechRadar

Posted: April 6, 2020 at 5:55 pm


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We're now in a post-Tiger King world. You've probably read a million articles on what happened to the various people you met in Netflix's latest documentary series, which is about the wild life of big cat owner Joe Exotic. But now it's time to figure out what you'll watch next.

Below, we've rounded up a few favorites that we think you'll want to see, now that Tiger King is done. All of them are on Netflix, except one, which you can stream on Amazon Prime. Not all of them are documentaries, either, as we've made recommendations based on specific elements of the show.

Did you like the true crime elements of Tiger King? We've picked out some hits of that genre, even if the subject matter is vastly different in our selections. Do you like your documentaries with a bit of humor, or do you simply enjoy cats? We've based a few choices around those things too.

Your first stop after this piece should be our list of the best Netflix documentaries, where you'll find a lot of great stuff to watch on the factual side.

Where to stream it: Netflix

If you loved how quickly Tiger King escalated, then youre going to want to check out Wild Wild Country. Wild Wild Country is a docuseries about Indian guru (and controversial cult leader) Osho, who gathered such a huge number of followers in the 80s that he decided to build a utopia in Oregon to house them all. But this wasnt just made up of tents and camp fires, this utopia was essentially a functioning city complete with an airport. But, of course, Oshos practises werent exactly above board, and thats when things get truly interesting.

Wild Wild Country will have you wondering how the heck you (probably) never heard about this story before, and have you perplexed at the lengths some people will go to to become (and follow) powerful figures.

Where to stream it: Netflix

Tiger King starts as a show about an eccentric with an eyebrow-raising number of big cats who seemingly just wants to be famous, before it gets darker. The overall larger-than-life quality of the Joe Exotic persona is one way the show gets you hooked.

If you've not seen it yet, mockumentary series American Vandal should be your next stop, if you enjoyed these comedic elements of the show.It's fictional, and therefore gets to be as funny as it wants to be,

The first season is set in a high school where pictures of penises are spray-painted onto every teacher's car, with one slightly wayward student taking the fall for the crime. Did he actually do it, though? The filmmakers in this excellent series investigate, and it's got as many twists and turns as any real true crime series. The second season, set in another school where the entire student body is afflicted by laxatives, is another wild ride with an unforgettable conclusion.

Where to stream it: Netflix

Jenny Slates standup isnt just funny its otherworldly. In this hour-long comedy special for Netflix, Slate jokes about paranormal sightings in her childhood home, looking like Anne Frank as a child, and making love to the moon in one beautifully-twisted meditation on the self and way our identity is forged.

Its very, very weird but the Netflix format gives us a look behind the scenes too, with interviews with her family and candid moments backstage to show the apparatus behind the fever-pitch humor we get to see onstage.

Where to stream it: Netflix

The best part about Tiger King is all the b-roll footage of big cats, and if you want a long unbridled look at the best household pet animal, Cats_The_Mewvie is basically 90 minutes of videos of cats.

Well, technically theres a documentary somewhere here, looking at why cats are so popular in our lives and in online media, but if you can hear that over the awww and lookatit!s of the audience, you really need to turn your TV down.

Where to stream it: Netflix

Perhaps one of the most suspenseful documentaries on Netflix right now, the Devil Next Door follows a Cleveland grandfather and retired autoworker who is accused of being a notoriously sadistic Nazi guard known as Ivan the Terrible at the Treblinka extermination camp during the Holocaust.

The Devil Next Door sees John Demanjuk arrested, denaturalized as a US citizen, and extradited to Israel for what was one of the most highly publicized trials of the 20th century. If you loved Tiger King for its true crime intrigue, then The Devil Next Door should be the next show you add to your watch list, even if the subject matter is very different.

Where to stream it: Amazon Prime Video

Ever heard of a documentary premise that appears so outlandish that it couldnt possible be true? Then only to watch the film and find out the harrowing truth? Thats Dark Days in a nutshell.

Its an unbelievable look at New York Citys homeless community at the turn of the millennium, where a forgotten cohort of rough sleepers have established a literal underground community in a shanty town in the citys abandoned subway lines. Living their days without sunlight, its an eye-opening, often sad, look at what happens to those that society turns its back on. An excellent DJ Shadow soundtrack complements the black-and-white footage.

Where to stream it: Netflix

Making a Murderer was the first big Netflix true crime documentary to really capture the public's attention, sparking wider interest in the genre. Exploring the question of guilt or innocence of the convicted Steven Avery for the murder of young photographer Teresa Halbach, you could argue this show has created a frenzy for the genre that borders on the unhealthy.

It's a very different show in subject matter, tone and seriousness, as you'd expect.

Making a Murderer remains the best true crime documentary on Netflix. You've got two seasons to watch here if you somehow haven't seen it already, and it's very well-made. Be sure to read more background materials on the case once you're done watching.

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Finished Tiger King? 7 shows you should watch next on Netflix and Amazon Prime - TechRadar

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April 6th, 2020 at 5:55 pm

Posted in Osho

Coronavirus vs nostalgia: Escaping the epidemic on a magic carpet with Nukkad, Ram, Tintin and Tendulkar – Firstpost

Posted: at 5:55 pm


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A few taps on the tiny triangles, and 22 editions of Tintin hurtled into my phone like the avalanches on his Tibetan adventure. A close friend had sent the pdf versions on WhatsApp without a comment the way mothers quietly leave a towel and a cup of hot chocolate when you come back wet in the rain.

The e-books are a sweet, sticky slice of nostalgia, to be savoured in the yawning leisure of a lockdown. The past is at a premium in the time of pandemic.

Indians are travelling back to the 1980s and '90s on the dusty, old carpet called Doordarshan, watching Ramayan, Mahabharat, Shaktimaan and Chanakya, asking for Yeh Jo Hai Zindagi, Nukkad, Humlog and other serials to be dusted out of the archives.

Follow all the latest coronavirus updates here

Others are turning to Friends and the 1990s of Spyro video games, audio cassettes and eraser pencils.

So, is there a profound connection between crisis and nostalgia?

Is something deeply unsettling and life-altering like the COVID-19 outbreak trigger regression to happy, distilled memories?

Is watching the finest Sachin Tendulkar or VVS Laxman innings on loop a way to cope with disaster and uncertainly?

Does watching the 1980s Liril ads help mask the smell of fear?

Wake the inner child

"The main purpose of nostalgia is precisely to ensure the continuity of identity in the face of adversity these stories of nostalgia are vital aspects of maintaining the continuity of the self, or a narrative identity, when much else in life is characterised by discontinuity and uncertainty," researcher Oddgeir Synnes writes in Narratives of Nostalgia in the Face of Death: The importance of lighter stories of the past in palliative care.

Psychoanalyst Erik Erikson is among the earliest and most notable to describe an individual's sense of identity as a continuity of one's past, present and future.

Which probably explains our need to delve into myths, stories and objects from childhood that define us, to make sure catastrophic events or an unpredictable future do not break the thread of our identity.

Because Sachin's straight drive, Kodak's extinct film rolls, 'main samay hoon' opening of Mahabharat, roasted wild boars of Asterix comics and many other living-dead make us what we are.

We chose peripatetic heroes like Lord Ram or Tintin, as Carl Jung explains, because "heroes are usually wanderers, and wandering is a symbol of longing, of the relentless urge which never finds its object".

Representational image. Tintin and the Picaros

Future, present, past

The search for this continuity takes TS Eliot to the Bhagavad Gita. In Four Quartets, Eliot writes of nostalgia as "wistful regret" of the future about the present:

I sometimes wonder if that is what Krishna meant Among other things or one way of putting the same thing: That the future is a faded song, a Royal Rose or a lavender spray Of wistful regret for those who are not yet here to regret, Pressed between yellow leaves of a book that has never been opened.

Humans retire into happy pockets from the past to deal with crisis. During the coronavirus lockdown, people also have enough time to ponder whether they have allowed themselves to be slaves to machine pace.

In big cities, even sparkling blue skies and clean air, or leopards, deer and civets unexpectedly sauntering into our space represent something pure and primordial, things from a forgotten past.

Osho's words, however, cut through this sentimentality like cold shards.

"One who goes on looking back cannot live the future. It is as if you are driving your car looking only at the rear-view mirror. You are doomed. Only when you reverse your car, it is okay, use it. Or sometimes somebody is honking his horn from behind, then look but dont get obsessed with the rear-view mirror. It may be a beautiful mirror, but please, look ahead. You are driving into the future."

But then, the coronavirus lockdown has put us in reverse gear. For a while, we can indulge ourselves with a few wistful glances at the rear-view mirror.

Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets. Get technology news, gadgets reviews & ratings. Popular gadgets including laptop, tablet and mobile specifications, features, prices, comparison.

Original post:
Coronavirus vs nostalgia: Escaping the epidemic on a magic carpet with Nukkad, Ram, Tintin and Tendulkar - Firstpost

Written by admin

April 6th, 2020 at 5:55 pm

Posted in Osho

Is Trance inspired by Osho? Writer of the Fahadh Faasil starrer clears the air – Republic World – Republic World

Posted: February 25, 2020 at 1:41 am


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Vincent Vadakkan, who is credited to be the writer of Malayalam movie Trance, recently took to his social media to announce the release date of the film. The post received a lot of appreciation andintrigue.People asked Vadakkan if the Fahadh Faasil and Nazriya Nazim starrer is inspired by Indian godman Osho. Here is what the writer had to say.

Also Read |Fahadh Faasil Starrer 'Trance' Gets A Second Trailer Two Days Before Release

Also Read |Fahadh Faasil's Trance In A Censorship Brawl Over A Provocative 8-minute Long Sequence?

Trance has been one of the most anticipated Malayalam movies of the year. The movie that is in the making for years, has the audiences intrigued after the makers released the trailer of the film. The 1 minute 25 seconds trailer takes the audiences on a mad ride with Viju's (character played by Fahadh Faasil) diverse characters. The trailer released on February 18 has puzzled the audiences with its similarities to godman Osho's life. So, when a social media user questioned the same to Vadakkan, he assured them that the movie is not inspired by Osho or any other literary work.

The movie, starring Fahadh Faasil, Nazariya Nazim, and Vinayakan in the lead, has an ensemble cast consisting of Vinayakan, Soubin Shahir, Dileesh Pothan, Arjun Ashokan, Chemban Vinod Jose, among others, will also mark the acting debut of Tamil director Gautam Menon. The Anwar Rasheed directorial is reported to narrate the tale of a fisherman, who after getting mystical powers turns into a goldlike figure for many.

Meanwhile, Fahadh Faasil is reportedly busy shooting for Mahesh Narayan'sMalik. The forthcoming movie, starring Fahadh Faasil, Joju George, and Maala Parvathi in the lead, is reported to be based on a real-life story. For the role in the film, Fahadh is reported to have lost a significant amount of weight. The Fahadh Faasil starrer is reported to hit the marquee by 2020.

Also Read |Fahadh Faasil's 'Trance' Gets Postponed, Will Now Release On THIS Date

Also Read |Nazriya Nazim's First Look From The Upcoming Movie Trance Is Out

Get the latest entertainment news from India & around the world. Now follow your favourite television celebs and telly updates. Republic World is your one-stop destination for trending Bollywood news. Tune in today to stay updated with all the latest news and headlines from the world of entertainment.

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Is Trance inspired by Osho? Writer of the Fahadh Faasil starrer clears the air - Republic World - Republic World

Written by admin

February 25th, 2020 at 1:41 am

Posted in Osho

Line of Duty series 6: Everything we know, from BBC release date, new cast members to H theories – The Independent

Posted: at 1:41 am


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Over the past eight years, Line of Duty has evolved from a smallBBC Two drama to BBC Ones biggest ratings-puller.

The series, fromBodyguardcreator Jed Mercurio, follows AC-12, a fictional police squad assigned with uncovering corruption within the police force.

But what details do we know about the forthcoming sixth series? Below is a compilation of all the key information, from release date to the identity of the actor playing the next potentially corrupt officer.

There is no word on when to expect the new series, but filming is currently underway in Belfast. Excitingly, thefirst table read for new episodes took place earlier this month.

Going by how long fans have had to wait for previous outings, Line of Duty should be back next spring the most recent series began in March 2019.

However, writer Jed Mercurio told Radio Times in October that he would hope the show returns sometime in 2020.

Kelly McDonald will be playing the shady characterbeing investigated by AC-12. Shell appear as DCI Joanne Davidson, who is described as the senior investigating officer of an unsolved murder, whose unconventional conduct raises suspicions at AC-12. McDonald joins returning cast members Martin Compston (DS Steve Arnott), Vicky McClure (DI Kate Fleming) and Adrian Dunbar (Superintendent Ted Hastings).

Mercurio describedJoanne is the most enigmatic adversary AC-12 have ever faced.

Following Macdonalds casting, Compston wrote: Another magnificent addition to the Line of Duty team. Said it before [a] huge part of the shows success is the phenomenal guest actors weve had. Kelly Macdonald will be up there with the best of them what a talent, what a career.

Also joining the cast is Shalom Brune-Franklin (Our Girl), Andi Osho (Kiri) and Prasanna Puwanarajah (Doctor Foster).

Perry Fitzpatrick, who previously starred opposite McClure in This Is England, will also appear.

Few dead horses have been more flogged, but if you stretch your mind back enough, it is possible to remember a series with a fantastic premise that kept us guessing for 12 whole episodes. The question: had returning war hero Sgt Brody (Damian Lewis) been radicalised in a foreign jail cell? CIA officer Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) thought so, but she had plenty of problems of her own. I still think it would have been better if he'd detonated at the denouement. Twisty, compelling, briefly essential. (EC)

Showtime

The slow-burning relationship between Cathy (Lesley Manville), a widow and mother of superhuman forbearance, and her late husbands best pal Michael (Peter Mullan) elevated what could have been a run-of-the-mill suburban comedy into a beautifully composed portrait of friendship, grief and mid-life romance. (FS)

BBC

Hulus adaptation of Margaret Atwoods 1985 novel, set in a pious patriarchal state, lost its way in the second series, but the first, which arrived a few months after Trump entered the White House, was a triumph. As Offred, Elisabeth Moss seethed under her mask of impassivity, while the rich palette gave us a dystopian nightmare as imagined by the 17th-century Dutch school. (FS)

Hulu

Perhaps the trashiest show on this list, but trash of the highest grade, Money Heist is Netflix's most popular non-English series, a hit across Europe and South America, with 34m accounts watching this year's Part 3 in its first week of release. A mysterious mastermind known as The Professor gathers together a crew of misfit criminals to execute a robbery on the Royal Mint in Spain. Tense, funny, clever and often completely preposterous, La Casa del Papel has only been held back by its off-putting English title. (EC)

Netflix

It unfortunately inspired some of the worst fans on the internet, but that shouldn't detract from Rick and Morty's inventiveness. Ostensibly a parody of Back to the Future, about the adventures of a young boy and his alcoholic, mad scientist grandfather, the cartoon uses its set-up to put its heroes in an endless number of frenetic, frequently insane situations. Blink and you miss a gag and two pop-culture references. (EC)

Adult Swim

This exquisite French series is about the dead trying to return to their old lives in a secluded mountain town dispensed with the usual gory zombie tropes, instead dwelling on the human instincts of these confused beings specifically their desire to love and be loved and the grief experienced by those they left behind. (FS)

Channel 4

Sharon Horgan and Rob Delaney were a masterful double act in this sitcom about a holiday fling resulting in an unplanned pregnancy. The pairs attempts to build a life together yielded scabrous gags about sex and post-partum leakage, a cameo from the late Carrie Fisher and an underlying tenderness that resisted spilling into sentimentality. (FS)

Channel 4

A wicked cocktail of comedy and humanity, shock and gore, the first series of Killing Eve, written by Phoebe Waller-Bridge, was a subversive joy. Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer played, respectively, a spy and an assassin whose continental game of cat-and-mouse was a blood-spattered love story for the ages. Sadly, when Waller-Bridge handed off writing duties in the second series, the magic wasn't quite the same. (FS)

BBC/BBC America

The Killing may have started the Scandi craze, but it aired in Denmark in 2007, so it doesn't count for these purposes. Borgen was everything The West Wing wasn't: a clich-resistant drama that showed politics in grating reality, with plenty of plausible schemers in slick outfits and a wonderful central performance by Sidse Babett Knudsen as Birgitte Nyborg, the Prime Minister trying to balance principles with power. (EC)

DR Fiktion

Following the exploits of Lance (Toby Jones) and Andy (Mackenzie Crook), dedicated treasure hunters and members of the Danebury Metal Detecting Club, Detectorists was about people and their passions, community and camaraderie. Its a wonderfully tranquil meditation on male companionship. (FS)

BBC

Where other series burn brightly and fade after a couple of years, FX's Cold War spy drama took its time. Matthew Rhys and Kerri Russell, married in real life, shone as the Russian couple working as spies in suburban Washington DC. The tension built over six seasons to a magnificent finale, rewarding those who stuck with it. (EC)

Patrick Harbron/FX via AP

The premise is one of the most intriguing in television: people struggling to come to terms with something called the "Sudden Departure", a mysterious event in whichtwo per cent of the world's population simply disappeared. Damon Lindelof and Tom Perrotta's drama received iffy reviews at first, but its reputation grew through its second and final outings, with writing and performances that explored the full depth of the setup without losing the pervasive air of mystery. (EC)

HBO

The third series is a noticeable drop-off in quality, but for two series The Crown achieved a number of unexpected feats. It made viewers genuinely interested in the Royal Family, and not in a Prince Andrew "should they go to prison?" kind of way. With sumptuous sets and costumes and some excellent performances, especially Claire Foy as the young monarch, this remains the high-water mark of Netflix polish proof that money can, sometimes, buy you love. (EC)

Netflix/PA

Reports of the death of TVs baking behemoth have been greatly exaggerated: despite host departures, a channel move and the off-screen antics of a certain perma-tanned judge, this big-hearted competition in which friendships are forged and adults weep over sagging souffls remains the ultimate feel-good reality show. (FS)

Channel 4

Two men bicker over bottles of fine wine. Steve Coogan and Rob Brydons low-key, semi-improvised and implausibly funny tours of high-end European restaurants saw the pairs insecurities deliciously laid bare as they discussed sex, ageing and ambition. Michael Winterbottom directed. (FS)

IFC Films

This Yorkshire-set, Bafta-festooned series gave us Catherine Cawood (Sarah Lancashire), a pleasingly complex, no-nonsense police sergeant up to her neck in rapists, murderers, addicts and the odd ailing sheep, together with some superbly earthy dialogue courtesy of writer Sally Wainwright. (FS)

BBC

Without Girls there is no Fleabag or Adam Driver, and it would probably merit inclusion on those two facts alone. But Lena Dunham now attracts as much opprobrium as praise, and it's easy to forget how new her breakthrough comedy felt in its naturalistic depiction of young women in New York. This was Sex and the City for people who spent more time on Instagram than at work, created by people the same age as those they were portraying. Its look and feel have cast a long shadow. (EC)

Rex Features

Witty, inventive and dazzling to look at, Steven Moffatt and Mark Gatisss relocation of the Arthur Conan Doyle stories to the present day worked beautifully, as did the casting of Benedict Cumberbatch as the high-functioning sociopath Holmes and Martin Freeman as the put-upon army veteran Watson. While later series would drift, the first three were unbeatable. (FS)

BBC

A five-part drama about a nuclear disaster in 1986 is not the most promising prospect for a night in with a bottle of wine. It is a tribute to the writer, Craig Mazin, and director, Johan Renck, as well as its cast, especially Jared Harris, that Chernobyl managed to be totally gripping, with frequent moments of stark, horrendous beauty. (EC)

HBO

At first, the musician and comedian Donald Glover's series about struggling rappers in Atlanta looked like a familiar, safe kind of sitcom about loveable losers. But it quickly evolved into something fresh: a smart, occasionally surreal examination of life at the margins of America, whose angry heart never spilled into preachiness or got in the way of the jokes. (EC)

AP

Who could have anticipated a dating show in which twenty-somethings sit around in microscopic swimwear would tell us so much about the human condition? Gaslighting, bromances, the complexities of girl code Love Island delved beneath the spray tans and schooled the nation on modern manners. (FS)

Rex Features

An electrifying study of addiction, trauma and the corrupting power of privilege, based on the autobiographical books by Edward St Aubyn. Benedict Cumberbatch played the feckless antihero grappling with his past and trying (and mostly failing) to be better than the wretched aristos that raised him. (FS)

Sky

Ken Burns's epic 10-part documentary followed up his other conflict opuses, on The Civil War and The War, with a detailed story about Vietnam. Using new interviews from both sides as well as archive footage, the documentary shows in unrelenting detail a catastrophe that unfolded in slow motion. Some critics accused it of underserving the experience of the Vietnamese civilians. But it left viewers in no doubt that not only did the US leadership pursue it long after it was a lost cause, but they knew from the start it was unwinnable. (EC)

Trailer screenshot

Charlie Brooker sent every other TV critic, or at least one of them, into a spiral of envy by proving not only that it was possible to cross over into creation, but to do so in style. Black Mirror's taut near-future tales of techno-dystopia are almost always interesting, even if they sometimes fall short of their ambitions, as with the high-concept recent film, "Bandersnatch". The best episodes, like 2016's tour de force, "San Junipero", are gripping examinations of human connection in a world where interactions are increasingly by screens. (EC)

Getty Images

The first of the Attenborough documentaries to speak directly of the human impact on the natural world, this kaleidoscopic ocean odyssey provided a visual feast of clam-cracking tuskfish, alien-looking pyrosomes and anthropomorphic dolphins, while reminding us how it could all be lost. (FS)

BBC

Only in a world of Netflix budgets can you imagine a concept as wild as BoJack Horsemans getting off the ground. It's a cartoon set in LA, ostensibly a comedy about celebrity, except half the characters, including its lead, are anthropomorphised animals. Halfway through its final season, which has been split into two, its initial zaniness has given way to something darker and more interesting. Lurid colours and visual wit dress one of the most humane explorations of depression, addiction and cycles of abuse. (EC)

Netflix

What began, in its first series, as an enjoyably acid-tongued portrait of modern womanhood became a fully fledged masterpiece in the second. Written by and starring Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Fleabag gave us perfectly calibrated scenes of familial dysfunction and sexual longing the latter memorably culminating in the Priests simple, thrilling instruction: Kneel. (FS)

BBC

The first spin-off series from Shane Meadows 2007 film, about a gang of ex-skinheads from the Midlands, was set during the 1986 World Cup, and remains one of the great British dramas, depicting working class lives with humanity and humour. This is England 88 and 90 followed, both of them similarly infused with heart and soul. (FS)

Channel 4

Said to have been a decade in the making, Succession is worth every minute spent on it. Brian Cox enjoys a dream of a late-career role as Logan Roy, the ageing media tycoon unwilling to relinquish control of his company to any of his ungrateful and talentless children. There's oblivious eldest son Connor (Alan Ruck), troubled addict Kendall (Jeremy Strong), scheming daughter Shiv (Sarah Snook) and abrasive youngest Roman (Kieran Culkin), along with a host of hangers-on, partners and support staff. None of them seem to have the right stuff. It's an intriguing set-up, but Succession is lifted by its script, performances, locations, costumes, music and direction, which place it firmly in a tradition of laughing at our rulers, where the mirth comes tempered with the knowledge that these are really the people in charge. (EC)

Graeme Hunter

Yes, the final series went a bit weird. Maybe the final two series. A case could be made that the TV adaptation was never as emotionally resonant when it went beyond George RR Martin's novels. The final series were only disappointing compared to what had come before, which was a fantasy on an unprecedented scale that managed to be grandiose without slipping into melodrama. An invented universe with necromancers, dragons, magic swords and ice zombies was notable for its plausible realpolitik. At a time when viewing tastes were meant to be becoming more atomised, Game of Thrones was global event TV, which made household names of the Starks, Lannisters and Greyjoys and provided a whole generation of English character actors with a regular income. (EC)

AP

Few dead horses have been more flogged, but if you stretch your mind back enough, it is possible to remember a series with a fantastic premise that kept us guessing for 12 whole episodes. The question: had returning war hero Sgt Brody (Damian Lewis) been radicalised in a foreign jail cell? CIA officer Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) thought so, but she had plenty of problems of her own. I still think it would have been better if he'd detonated at the denouement. Twisty, compelling, briefly essential. (EC)

Showtime

The slow-burning relationship between Cathy (Lesley Manville), a widow and mother of superhuman forbearance, and her late husbands best pal Michael (Peter Mullan) elevated what could have been a run-of-the-mill suburban comedy into a beautifully composed portrait of friendship, grief and mid-life romance. (FS)

BBC

Hulus adaptation of Margaret Atwoods 1985 novel, set in a pious patriarchal state, lost its way in the second series, but the first, which arrived a few months after Trump entered the White House, was a triumph. As Offred, Elisabeth Moss seethed under her mask of impassivity, while the rich palette gave us a dystopian nightmare as imagined by the 17th-century Dutch school. (FS)

Hulu

Perhaps the trashiest show on this list, but trash of the highest grade, Money Heist is Netflix's most popular non-English series, a hit across Europe and South America, with 34m accounts watching this year's Part 3 in its first week of release. A mysterious mastermind known as The Professor gathers together a crew of misfit criminals to execute a robbery on the Royal Mint in Spain. Tense, funny, clever and often completely preposterous, La Casa del Papel has only been held back by its off-putting English title. (EC)

Netflix

It unfortunately inspired some of the worst fans on the internet, but that shouldn't detract from Rick and Morty's inventiveness. Ostensibly a parody of Back to the Future, about the adventures of a young boy and his alcoholic, mad scientist grandfather, the cartoon uses its set-up to put its heroes in an endless number of frenetic, frequently insane situations. Blink and you miss a gag and two pop-culture references. (EC)

Adult Swim

This exquisite French series is about the dead trying to return to their old lives in a secluded mountain town dispensed with the usual gory zombie tropes, instead dwelling on the human instincts of these confused beings specifically their desire to love and be loved and the grief experienced by those they left behind. (FS)

Channel 4

Sharon Horgan and Rob Delaney were a masterful double act in this sitcom about a holiday fling resulting in an unplanned pregnancy. The pairs attempts to build a life together yielded scabrous gags about sex and post-partum leakage, a cameo from the late Carrie Fisher and an underlying tenderness that resisted spilling into sentimentality. (FS)

Channel 4

A wicked cocktail of comedy and humanity, shock and gore, the first series of Killing Eve, written by Phoebe Waller-Bridge, was a subversive joy. Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer played, respectively, a spy and an assassin whose continental game of cat-and-mouse was a blood-spattered love story for the ages. Sadly, when Waller-Bridge handed off writing duties in the second series, the magic wasn't quite the same. (FS)

BBC/BBC America

The Killing may have started the Scandi craze, but it aired in Denmark in 2007, so it doesn't count for these purposes. Borgen was everything The West Wing wasn't: a clich-resistant drama that showed politics in grating reality, with plenty of plausible schemers in slick outfits and a wonderful central performance by Sidse Babett Knudsen as Birgitte Nyborg, the Prime Minister trying to balance principles with power. (EC)

DR Fiktion

Following the exploits of Lance (Toby Jones) and Andy (Mackenzie Crook), dedicated treasure hunters and members of the Danebury Metal Detecting Club, Detectorists was about people and their passions, community and camaraderie. Its a wonderfully tranquil meditation on male companionship. (FS)

BBC

Where other series burn brightly and fade after a couple of years, FX's Cold War spy drama took its time. Matthew Rhys and Kerri Russell, married in real life, shone as the Russian couple working as spies in suburban Washington DC. The tension built over six seasons to a magnificent finale, rewarding those who stuck with it. (EC)

Patrick Harbron/FX via AP

The premise is one of the most intriguing in television: people struggling to come to terms with something called the "Sudden Departure", a mysterious event in whichtwo per cent of the world's population simply disappeared. Damon Lindelof and Tom Perrotta's drama received iffy reviews at first, but its reputation grew through its second and final outings, with writing and performances that explored the full depth of the setup without losing the pervasive air of mystery. (EC)

HBO

The third series is a noticeable drop-off in quality, but for two series The Crown achieved a number of unexpected feats. It made viewers genuinely interested in the Royal Family, and not in a Prince Andrew "should they go to prison?" kind of way. With sumptuous sets and costumes and some excellent performances, especially Claire Foy as the young monarch, this remains the high-water mark of Netflix polish proof that money can, sometimes, buy you love. (EC)

Netflix/PA

Reports of the death of TVs baking behemoth have been greatly exaggerated: despite host departures, a channel move and the off-screen antics of a certain perma-tanned judge, this big-hearted competition in which friendships are forged and adults weep over sagging souffls remains the ultimate feel-good reality show. (FS)

Channel 4

Two men bicker over bottles of fine wine. Steve Coogan and Rob Brydons low-key, semi-improvised and implausibly funny tours of high-end European restaurants saw the pairs insecurities deliciously laid bare as they discussed sex, ageing and ambition. Michael Winterbottom directed. (FS)

Read the original:
Line of Duty series 6: Everything we know, from BBC release date, new cast members to H theories - The Independent

Written by admin

February 25th, 2020 at 1:41 am

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Enyimba will thread with caution away to San Pedro – Osho – Latest Sports News In Nigeria – Brila

Posted: February 3, 2020 at 12:41 pm


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Interim coach of Enyimba FC Fatai Osho has stated that the Peoples Elephant will thread with caution ahead of this Sundays make or break trip to Cote divoire where they face already eliminated Ivorian side San Pedro FC in the final group stage game of the CAF Confederation cup.

San Pedro as at now are out of the competition completely and they stand to lose absolutely nothing. And when youre playing with no pressure, some teams tend to play better in that situation and thats why we have to be a bit careful, we have to bring in our A game to get the needed result.

We should not be of the illusion that the San Pedro team are out and hence will be an easy pick. Its not going to be that way.

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Enyimba will thread with caution away to San Pedro - Osho - Latest Sports News In Nigeria - Brila

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February 3rd, 2020 at 12:41 pm

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Ma Anand Sheela Talks To Neha Dhupia On Working For Osho: There Is A Certain Spirituality In Criminality – Koimoi

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Ma Anand Sheela has become a celebrity and it is probably not for all the right reasons. She is known for her work that she did under Oshos guidance and we all know that it was not very righteous. But Ma Anand Sheela never regretted being a part of the cult. She disappeared after Oshos cult dissolved itself and only reappeared recently.

Sheela has been giving interviews about her time with Osho and has been very open about her experience. She appeared on Netflixs show Wild Wild Country and is now even looking forward to her biopic. She recently sat for a chat with Neha Dhupia at the closing session of the 11th TiEcon in Mumbai. She talked about her life, her new business and urged businessman to live life on their own and build their business.

Talking about working with Osho, Ma Anand Sheela said, I worked for a mad man and I loved every minute of it. Every hour of my existence now is a fragrance of Bhagwans teachings that I have carried in my heart and brains. The way I ran my homes, I have run my homes, there is same love and same intensity. It began from small things like cleaning up, administration and implementation of laws. Before I did Bhagwans work, now I am my own boss.

She also talked about her famous statement that there are similarities between spirituality and criminality. There is a certain spirituality in criminality. What bigger crime is there than to sell you a product that has no guarantee? People sell meditation and enlightenment. Spiritual leaders make false promises.

I do not want to discourage anybody here who is meditating or who is spiritual or is into enlightenment, but I cannot be duped by that. If you understand the concept and logic, you will use the time that you used in meditation into self-reflection, she said.

Talking about her biopic, Priyanka Chopra will soon start shooting for it. The biopic on Ma Anand Sheela will be directed by Barry Levinson.

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Ma Anand Sheela Talks To Neha Dhupia On Working For Osho: There Is A Certain Spirituality In Criminality - Koimoi

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February 3rd, 2020 at 12:41 pm

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Nederland resident imagineers a veterans’ ownership village – The Mountain -Ear

Posted: January 27, 2020 at 8:46 pm


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John Scarffe, Nederland. Nederland resident Marcelo Mainzer has designed a concept to give veterans ownership of their time and lives. The Egalitarian Eco-Village Makers Districts (EEV MD) would be run as a workers cooperative corporation, 3D built and run by 175 formerly homeless veterans.

The Eco-Village will be a community whose inhabitants seek to live according to ecological principles, causing as little impact on the environment as possible. The Makers Districts will be a 100-acre Planned Use Development of legacy homes, organic food and clean energy production, retail shops, community healing and educational centers, retirement homes and homeless shelters.

The worker cooperative corporation will be owned and self-managed by its worker stakeholders, under the one worker one vote rule. The proposed concept can clear a path for 175 veterans and their families to build their own economically, energetically and agriculturally self-sustaining Eco-village Makers District.

Mainzer proposes utilizing the EEV MD coop web site, social media and grassroots organizing to reach out to the 40,000 veterans who are homeless on any given night in the United States and invite them to apply for consideration as the first 175 mission specialists to build the first EEV MD. The application process will be a combination of private and military sector assessment testing geared to recruit individuals who are best suited to the work that needs to be done, as the project progresses.

When all 175 applicants have been selected, they are guided, by council, through the process of creating a prospectus to apply for, with their VA benefits, a construction loan of $75 million. Working capital can be found in Social Impact Bonds. This project is for-profit, mission driven and immensely scalable and is seeking $30,000 to $100,000 in seed capital to perform formal due diligence and begin the application process.

Mainzer said the response to the concept design has been overwhelmingly encouraging in applauding the idea. Almost every aspect has been proven in the real world for decades, he said. From the start, it would determine the most in-demand services and products to insure the greatest monetary income.

I firmly believe that catastrophic climate change may be as little as five years away,

Mainzer said. Communities that are able to produce the means to meet their needs will survive. EEV MD like communities can model an alternative to the current 19th century economic system we are addicted to, Mainzer said.

Mainzer, now 61 years old, is an immigrant, having arrived in the United States at the age of four from Argentina. His father escaped Nazi Germany when he was 14 years old and grew up in Buenos Aires in the 1950s, when it was the Paris of South America.

Mainzer said about his father, He was creative, intelligent, jovial and hardworking, and I think angry. I feel his anger was born of being exiled from the land of his ancestors going back ten generations in Germany.

His father thrived in Argentinas Jewish community, and at a relatively young age, he owned his own business, had a beautiful wife, young daughter and son. In 1963, an uncle told him to come to America, because the streets are littered with gold and all one had to do was stoop to pick it up.

His father believed the promise of America, so much so that he left his second home and brought the family to America. Quickly, he learned that getting that gold required great effort, so he worked himself up from a body and fender man, through traveling jewelry salesman in Los Angeles to owning a precision tool business and finally as an insurance broker.

His fathers big dream was to gather together a group of families and buy an island they could call their own. Mainzer inherited his fathers big dream, though not his dedication to meet his fiscal responsibilities.

Mainzer grew up in the late sixties and early seventies in The Valley, North Hollywood, and was a reading addict from the age of seven. I was an odd combination of brawn and brains that made me an outcast, Mainzer said. I was mostly bored academically and ended up doing construction for a living and accumulating data for fun.

Despite his hard-working fathers efforts, the familys economic situation fluctuated and they moved several times. Mainzer attended Waldorf school in his primary years and then a series of middle schools, two public junior highs and a high school.

At 11 years old, Mainzer had an epiphany that imagined military subscription being used as a coming of age ritual in public service for positive endeavors like disaster relief, an expansion of things like the Engineers Corp. or Americorps with nations globally supporting each other.

Mainzer has lived a Gypsy lifestyle, including the parts where he often found himself at odds with society and the courts. He lived in the San Fernando Valley, Saugus, the Hollywood Hills, San Francisco, Phoenix, Hawaii, Wisconsin and all over the Boulder and Denver Metro areas seeking a place to call home.

Mainzer has done significant experiential work including Path of Love with the Osho Leela folks and attended the Mankind Project, New Warrior Weekend. My career path has woven through construction, personal assistant and the sales industry. I am a poor employee.

Mainzer has been in Nederland for about seven months. He said: Id always heard that Ned was a place where a misfit might fit in. Mainzer has done work as a freelancer for Blacktie Colorado for almost a decade off and on and has tended towards one-man companies including Just Task Me, Concierge and Errand Service and A Handy Man to Have Around, construction services.

What I do best is innovate, Mainzer said. For at least a decade, I have billed myself an Imagineer; I see solutions in my mind then research whether they have already been tried or not.

That feeling of not belonging and his fathers big dream led Mainzer to many spiritual groups and practices, but he didnt find one that felt like home; a place where people worked together to support each others happiness, for love not money.

I was told, at a young age, that one must give away what they want most, to have it. I tend to give away too much, that combined with a lackadaisical attitude towards money have kept me near poverty my entire life.

In the past ten years, Mainzer has spent many hours working on a path to giving to others, and what he wants most. He says, To live in a place where we are all owners and take ownership, where the dominant paradigm is, By nurturing Self Realization in the individual, the community thrives.

Col. Dr. George Patrin once called Mainzer the real deal in his devotion to his work. He also connected him to Patch Adams who sent Mainzer his book, with a personal note encouraging him to continue.

For further information, contact Marcelo Mainzer- Founder, Imagineer, PO Box 472, Nederland, CO, 80466, civillianmarcelo@gmail.com.

(Originally published in the January 23, 2020, print edition of The Mountain-Ear.)

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January 27th, 2020 at 8:46 pm

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Enyimbas Afelokhai, five others return to training – The Nation Newspaper

Posted: January 11, 2020 at 5:45 am


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By Tunde Liadi

Enyimba have got positive updates from the treatment table after some of their injured players returned to training and are making progress ahead of their must win CAF Confederation Cup Matchday Four tie with Paradou AC of Algeria in Aba.

The Peoples Elephant have been battling with injuries to first team players but Theophilus Afelokhai, Andrew Abalogu, Stanley Dimgba and Nelson Ogbonnaya have resumed training with their teammates and could play some part in Sundays game if the interim coach, Fatai Osho gets the greenlight from the medical team for them to be fielded.

The media aide of the team, Bariza Zazi told NationSport that the four players have resumed training and are making progress towards a comeback to the team.

He, however, disclosed that Thomas Zenke and Ifeanyi Anaemena trained separately as they were still recovering from the injuries. Enyimba who recently changed their coach, Usman AbdAllah with Osho are third in Group D with three points from three games ahead of their blockbuster fixture with the Algerian opposition at the Enyimba Stadium, Aba on Sunday.

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January 11th, 2020 at 5:45 am

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Anand Sheela interview: It is time people know the real me – Scroll.in

Posted: December 29, 2019 at 8:44 pm


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Before Sheela Ambalal Patel (or Sheela Silverman, or Ma Anand Sheela, or Sheela Birnstiel) announced that Alia Bhatt was her choice of actor to play her on the big screen, and long after she sent a legal notice to Priyanka Chopra when she heard that Chopra was developing a script based on her life, the former Rajneesh aide was meeting journalists in India. Sheela is the subject of a Netflix documentary directed by Amit Madhesiya and Shirley Abraham and produced by Shakun Batra for Karan Johars Dharma Productions. The documentary, titled Ma Anand Sheela, will include a conversation between Sheela and Johar, interviews, and candid moments of her trip through India.

Batra will direct a separate biopic on Sheela, which will reportedly be headlined by Alia Bhatt and will also be produced by Dharma Productions.

Sheela, who is now 70, was the personal secretary and spokesperson of the godman Rajneesh in the 1980s. She ran his commune, Rajneeshpuram, in the American state of Oregon, and was involved in a series of controversies and crimes. In 1984, Sheela was sentenced to 20 years for attempted murder and assault, but she got paroled after 39 months. Her story has been detailed in the immensely successful Netflix documentary series Wild Wild Country. Sheela now lives in Switzerland, where she runs two care homes for seniors and people with degenerative illnesses.

How many women do you know who have built an entire city, and all I am known for is tough titties, she says in the trailer of the upcoming documentary series.

Spirituality is not for me, Sheela told Scroll.in. I was Bhagwans lover and manager of the entire Rajneesh movement. I had a tough job in hand, and that is forgotten. To build an entire city [in Oregon] is not a joke.

Shakun Batra, who was also present at the interview, said the documentary takes off from where Wild Wild Country ended. Anand Sheela is so many things she is a pop icon, an Osho spokesperson, a criminal. but nobody really knows the real her, Batra said. With this documentary, we follow her return to India and unreel the layers to reveal who the real Anand Sheela is.

Sheela was born in Vadodara and moved to America when she was 18. I am here today and I could withstand all that I went through in my life is because my parents taught me to be tenacious and focussed, she said.

She is sharp and staccato in her responses to questions about her life. This is the right time for me to be here, Sheela declared. There is no logical explanation to it, really. I wished this film to happen so people know the real me. I think it is time. She also wishes to work in India. I feel that my people, my relatives and people I knew are ready to accept me now, she said. This is a different India I have come to.

Also read:

In this series on godmans Rajneeshs American misadventure, unlimited drama but limited insight

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December 29th, 2019 at 8:44 pm

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A historic and cultural glimpse into Pune, from the lap of luxury – Indulgexpress

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Punes cultural landscape is often overshadowed by that of Mumbai. Slices of history peek through the modern vista in this city, but are also balanced by a youthful urban population. We took a short two-day trip to stay at the newly opened The Ritz-Carlton, Pune, the second one in the country, and we packed in a bit of what Pune has to offer.

The pleasures of the city start as soon as you enter, as the airport is a mere 15-minute drive from the hotel, a welcome change for us coming from Bengaluru. Flanked by the Poona Golf Course, the hotel makes for a striking sight.After being greeted by the staff,we made our way to our room, that oozed luxury. A glorious view of the golf course, a king-sized bed, a huge TV and a walk-in closet: what more could we ask for!

Steeped in Our Friday afternoon began with a high tea at their Tea Lounge. Fine China graced the table as weselected our brew. On offer were Chinese floral and fruity teas, but we stuck to the traditional English Breakfast. It paired excellently with the cucumber sandwiches and array of tea cakes. Sitting under the glittering grand chandelier, this meal truly made us feel royal.

Our next stop was the spa. We were ushered into the room for a signature treatment a full body massage with black pepper and eucalyptus oil. The warm oils and the expert masseuse eased awayall the tension from our body. The cherry on top was the steam and sauna room you can unwind in after the massage.

Dinner was at Three Kitchens and Bar, a buffet restaurantoffering the best of world cuisine. Fresh pastas, breads, Asiandelicacies and Indian classics were just some of the options that caught our eye. Holding fort Saturday promised an exciting itinerary for us a tour of some of the historic landmarks of the city. We started with the fort Shaniwar Wada, famouslyfeatured in the movie Bajirao Mastani. Although a lot of the structure burnt down in a fire in 1828, some of the gates andfountains still stand and impress with their grandeur. Another place to visit is the Aga Khan Palace, built by the Sultan Muhammed Shah Aga Khan III, that served as a prison for Mahatma Gandhi and his wife in the 1940s. A walk into the local market, Tulshi Baug, proved more fun than we expected. Although super crowded, the street side shops here offer everything from miniature kitchen sets for kids to counterfeit Kylie lip kits.

And, naturally, we also dug into some of the local snacks while on our day out. Sabudana vada is highly recommended, of course. We wrapped up the outing with a traditional thali at the famed Maratha Samrat restaurant. Back in the hotel, we donned our swimming costumes and headed to the pool, for a post-lunch dip. The infinity pool overlooking the busy street and lush greenery just does the trick when you want to relax.

Of sake andscallops The highlight of our trip, and we saved the best for last, was our dinner at Ukiyo, the fine-dine Japanese restaurant. Named after the Japanese word for a certain kind of pleasure seeking lifestyle, the modern restaurant was pure decadence stone walls lined with their sake selection, a robatayaki grill and the most exquisite dishes made of choicest produce. We dined on the fresh flavours of seafood and delicate sushi, accompanied by carafes of sake. A customary slice of Japanese Cheesecake and sesame ice cream brought our meal to an end, and unfortunately our holiday as well.

The next day, a quick taste of the regional and international breakfast at Three Kitchen and Bar later, we headed to the airport, bidding goodbye to the city, of which we saw a new side on this holiday. The Ritz-Carlton, Pune pampered us with its ornate decor, warm hospitality and unmatchable culinary offerings.

.............xx...........

Tuck in Here are some must-tryeateries in Pune: Vaidya Upahar Gruha:A 105-year-old institutionthat serves the best andmost authentic misal and pohe in town, were told. What sets them apart is their green misal due to the addition of green chilies. At Budhwar Peth

Maratha Samrat: Gostraight for the thali at this restaurant and top it up with a glass of solkadhi. The thali, available in vegetarian, mutton and fish options, comes with dishes such as bhakri, tambda rassa and stickyIndra rice. At Camp

German Bakery:You cant miss the famous Shrewsbury biscuits from this bakery if youre in Pune. Located near the Osho Ashram, this was also the site of the 2010 bomb blasts.At Koregaon Park

At Yerawada, Pune. The writer was at The Ritz-Carlton, Pune by invitation.

anagha@newindianexpress.com @anaghzzz

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