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Archive for the ‘Diet and Exercise’ Category

Universal Fitness: Putting the social in working out – Arizona Daily Sun

Posted: August 6, 2017 at 1:47 pm


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Three Northern Arizona University grads are hoping to jon a growing field: bringing the exercise world into the social media world.

Anthony West, Anthony Lawson and Matthew Drapkin are currently testing their new app, Universal Fitness, in San Diego and Flagstaff. They hope to releasethe beta version to the public before the end of the year.

The app is a kind of mashup of Facebook, Yelp and your favorite exercise tracking app. It allows users to share their workouts, tips and dietary advice with others and ask questions, as well as track their workouts, find and rate gyms and other facilities, and test their fitness. The number of places listed on the app is expected to grow as the number of users increases.

West and Lawsonacnowledged that Universal Fitness has many of the same features as millions of exercise apps currently on the market. However, most of those apps dont allow users to track more than one exercise type, provide a map for local gyms and workout facilities, or try to create and encourage a community of fitness, Lawson said.

We wanted to bring in all types of activity, West said. We wanted to bring different communities together who share a similar experience in trying to stay fit. It doesnt really matter what you do as long as you do it.

They want to create a voice and a place for individuals young and old who want to improve their health but need motivation from others to do so, Lawson said.

For example, there are some people who just lift weights and other people who just do cardio workouts like running or the elliptical, he said. But there is also a large and growing group of people who like mixing things up and doing both. Other apps in the Google Play and Apple iTunes stores focus on one type of activity: running, yoga, etc. Universal Fitness is designed to provide one location to track all of a users exercise, weightlifting, running, swimming, hiking, etc.

West and Lawson got the idea for a health app after they saw the effect that a lack of exercise and good diet had on their family members.

We both have a lot of family members with ill health, Lawson said.

We wanted to bring health and wellness to others, West added. We want to create a community of support for fitness here and across the nation.

The original idea behind the app was to make it easy to find locations to work out no matter where you are in the U.S., and eradicate the old excuse of not being able to work out while on a trip or vacation because you dont know where the closest gym is, Lawson said.

Users can add their favorite gyms and workout areas -- such as hiking trails -- to the app, which allows visitors with the app to scope out locations to workout, hike or run while visiting for work or on vacation, he said. This also allows you to connect with local fitness groups or enthusiasts who you might be able to partner with on a run or workout.

The app morphed into something much bigger when Drapkin joined the team, West said. Drapkin has a background in nutrition sciences. It was his idea to try to create a nutrition blog to provide information on diet and exercise app users and an exercise tracker to the app to count steps or reps. Theyre also toying with the idea of a rewards system for the app, much like the badge system that other exercise apps like FitBit and Strava use.

The app includes a blog with nutrition tips, recipes and a social media-type tab for photo and video shout-outs to friends or to ask questions. A shortcut button for feedback to the developers is also included.

While the finished app will be free to download, the trio is considering a monthly subscription service that would help users test their fitness and create custom workouts. Most of the financial support for the app will come from ads, Lawson said. He said the group is in negotiations with several advertisers now.

Right now, the trio has a Kickstarter page set up to help with startup costs and plans to release the beta version of the app by the end of the year.

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Universal Fitness: Putting the social in working out - Arizona Daily Sun

Written by grays

August 6th, 2017 at 1:47 pm

Doc: Choose better diet, exercise regimen for health – The Detroit News

Posted: July 30, 2017 at 2:30 pm


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Keith Roach, To Your Health Published 5:55 p.m. ET July 24, 2017

Dear Dr. Roach: In a recent column, you said, I dont find simply telling people to eat less and move more to always be an effective therapy. What do you suggest to patients wanting to lose weight?

C.N.

Dear C.N.: The vast majority of patients I see who are overweight know they are overweight, and have tried unsuccessfully to lose weight. Often, they have tried multiple different types of diets, sometimes having success in the short term, but then having gained it back. Eat less, move more, while correct, doesnt address the issues that are important for many people.

Although some of my colleagues will disagree with me, I look at the issue differently. I recommend that people choose a healthy diet. There are many healthy diets, and people can choose what they like, but I recommend plenty of vegetables, some fruits, and good-quality protein sources such as legumes or nuts and lean meats or fatty fish for those who eat them; processed foods, especially starches and processed meats, should be avoided. Along with these dietary changes, which are modest for many people, I advise increasing exercise, from wherever the person starts (within reason). My rationale is that losing weight often seems unattainable to people; however, eating better and exercising more feel like they are within ones control. There is no doubt that people will be healthier with a better diet and with more exercise.

It is true that over a long time, most people who make those dietary and exercise changes will lose weight. But the primary goal is to improve health, even if the weight doesnt come down.

Some people, especially those with medical problems due to their weight, need more-intensive intervention, and I am fortunate to have colleagues in weight management, both medical and surgical, for those who need it.

Dear Dr. Roach: My husband just got a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Were not thrilled, but it could have been worse. He is older than I am in his 70s. A few people have said that if you are going to get MS, it is not as bad when you are older. Is that true? What is his prognosis?

N.W.

Dear N.W.: I am sorry to hear about your husband. There is no good age to get this diagnosis. MS is the most common demyelinating disease of the nervous system. The myelin is a covering around the nerves, which protects them and speeds impulses. Without myelin, nerves cannot properly perform their function of communication. The myelin is destroyed by the bodys own systems, by an immune system that mistakes myelin for an invader.

It used to be thought that people who got MS at a younger age had a slower rate of disease progression; however, more recent studies have shown that age itself is not a strong predictor of the course of the disease. Similarly, being male was thought to predict worse outcomes, but that no longer seems to be the case.

It is very hard to predict how MS will progress in any given individual, as the disease can range dramatically. Some people have only a single episode in life (sometimes called benign MS, about 15 percent of cases). However, the most common is relapsing-remitting, with times of normal function interspersed with acute attacks. Finally, there is progressive disease, which can start right away (primary progressive MS) or after a period of time of relapsing-remitting (secondary progressive). About 12 percent of people have malignant MS, which leads to a need for assistance walking within five years.

MS is a complex disease, and I can barely scratch the surface of it here. There are many types of symptoms, but most people have at least one of the following: eye symptoms, numbness or weakness in a specific body area and terrible fatigue.

Email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

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Doc: Choose better diet, exercise regimen for health - The Detroit News

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July 30th, 2017 at 2:30 pm

Posted in Diet and Exercise

Choose a better diet and exercise regimen for health – Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Posted: at 11:34 am


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Dear Dr. Roach: In a recent column, you said, ''I don't find simply telling people to eat less and move more to always be an effective therapy.'' What do you suggest to patients wanting to lose weight? C.N.

Dear C.N.: The vast majority of patients I see who are overweight know they are overweight, and have tried unsuccessfully to lose weight. Often, they have tried multiple different types of diets, sometimes having success in the short term but then having gained it back. ''Eat less, move more,'' while correct, doesn't address the issues that are important for many people.

Although some of my colleagues will disagree with me, I look at the issue differently. I recommend that people choose a healthy diet. There are many healthy diets, and people can choose what they like, but I recommend plenty of vegetables, some fruits, and good-quality protein sources such as legumes or nuts and lean meats or fatty fish for those who eat them; processed foods, especially starches and processed meats, should be avoided. Along with these dietary changes, which are modest for many people, I advise increasing exercise, from wherever the person starts (within reason). My rationale is that ''losing weight'' often seems unattainable to people; however, eating better and exercising more feel like they are within one's control. There is no doubt that people will be healthier with a better diet and with more exercise.

It is true that over a long time, most people who make those dietary and exercise changes will lose weight. But the primary goal is to improve health, even if the weight doesn't come down.

Some people, especially those with medical problems due to their weight, need more-intensive intervention, and I am fortunate to have colleagues in weight management, both medical and surgical, for those who need it.

Dear Dr. Roach: I went gluten-free four years ago for ''health'' reasons. I had no irritable bowel issues or celiac disease. After this amount of time, is it OK to reintroduce wheat and gluten? Does going gluten-free when you do not have celiac disease cause you to become more gluten-sensitive because its reintroduction would be like a foreign substance to your system? I fear I may have caused myself to become gluten-sensitive by avoiding it when I didn't have to. Can you please advise? L.

Dear L.: If you had no gluten sensitivity and no celiac disease, then you should have no issues with going back on a diet containing gluten, as far as I have been able to tell from my reading and my understanding of the condition. However, some people with celiac disease have extremely mild symptoms it could be just some abdominal discomfort after eating, or fatigue symptoms felt by nearly everyone from time to time. Nonetheless, making the diagnosis of celiac disease is important, even in people with minimal or no symptoms. People with celiac disease are more likely to develop autoimmune disorders and some cancers, because of possible nutritional deficiencies, and dietary intervention is critical in the case of women who might become pregnant.

If you truly had no symptoms at all before you went gluten-free, and still don't once you restart, I don't think any testing is necessary. However, if you notice symptoms, then a blood antibody test while on a diet containing gluten can establish the diagnosis.

Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu.

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Choose a better diet and exercise regimen for health - Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Written by simmons

July 30th, 2017 at 11:34 am

Posted in Diet and Exercise

This expert says you need to let go of your ‘all or nothing approach’ – Body and Soul

Posted: at 11:34 am


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If you're constantly judging your diet, exercise regime and lifestyle by labelling things as 'good' and 'bad', you need to stop. Now.

Photo: Lyndi Cohen/ Supplied

This article initially appeared on lyndicohen.com and has been republished here with permission.

All-or-nothing thinking is also known as black-or-white thinking and it's when things are viewed as 'all good' or 'all bad.'

All-or-nothing thinking often means that anything less than 'perfect' is perceived as a failure.

Having these incredibly unattainable standards sets you up to feel like a failure, and you start to tell yourself things like "nothing I ever do is good enough", "if I just weighed less, then..." or "everyone is prettier and thinner than me".

All-or-nothing thinking keeps you stuck, unhealthy and unbalanced. You become unable to eat anything in moderation and are constantly yo-yo-ing from one extreme to another, flipping from restriction to binge eating or inactivity to over-doing at the gym. From feeling motivated and excited to feeling like it's not even worth trying.

But you are not the problem. All-or-nothing thinking is the problem, and it's holding you back.

Why? Well, first of all, you don't need to change yourself. You are enough just the way you are.

You just need to stop thinking it's 'all-or-nothing'.

The first steps to letting go of the all or nothing approach is to realise when you're doing it. Awareness is key. Take this short test to help you work out if you are a black or white thinker:

Is an 'all or nothing' approach to food holding you back from being healthy?

If you can relate to one or more of the following, you probably have an all-or-nothing approach and can benefit from making a mindset shift.

If any of these sound familiar, you need to let go of this approach, and start thinking of your health in holistic terms. These are some of the strategies that helped me...

1. Notice when you're stuck in this thinking pattern

The first step is to become aware of when you're using an 'all-or-nothing' approach. Often, using words like 'always', 'never' or 'nothing' will give you a clue that you're stuck in the cycle.

Try this instead: Count your success! At the end of each day, take two minutes to note the things you did well that day. Just before turning off the lights to sleep, I tell my partner the things I am grateful for about myself that day. This is important for me as my normal default is to run through all my flaws and faults. I don't talk about the things I didn't do well enough, only the things I am proud of doing or grateful to have learned.

2. Give yourself permission to enjoy food throughout the week

If you spend Monday to Friday being incredibly 'good' (or strict), then when it gets to the weekend, you're going to feel like you deserve a treat for your hard work. When you're feeling deprived, one cheat meal will often turn into a cheat weekend.

Try this instead: Give yourself permission to enjoy treats during the week. I personally like to have a couple of squares of chocolate every day. If I'm at a birthday party and there is cake, I'll have it if I feel like it and often I'll share. Say to yourself: "I am allowed it if I want, but do I really feel like it?"

3. Food is neither good or bad, so adjust your language

I get that you've been taught to think that there are 'good foods' or 'bad foods'. There aren't. Enjoying a piece of cake is not bad and salad is not good. Having cake and feeling guilty about it defeats the purpose. All food can be enjoyed in moderation at some time.

Try this instead: Don't refer to food as 'good' or 'bad'. Become aware of your language. You'll notice just how common, socially acceptable it is to label food as good/bad (black/white). Just because everyone else refers to food as good or bad doesn't mean you have to. Your thinking will change when your language does - and your behaviour will change with it.

4. Find the silver lining and practice being an anti-perfectionist

Good enough really is good enough. Something is better than nothing. Any small effort is worthy of being recognised and applauded.

Try this instead: Add the word 'but' to negative statements. For example, "I didn't get to exercise today BUT I did get to bed an hour earlier tonight and my body needs rest" or "I overate at dinner tonight BUT I understand why that happened" or "I ate chocolate today BUT I really enjoyed it" or "I didn't eat enough vegetables today BUT I did have two pieces of fruit". When I'm feeling less than perfect, I'll repeat to myself "I accept myself and accept others". It helps me let go of my need to be perfect and my expectation that everyone else must be perfect, too.

Dancer Amrita Hepi takes you through a stretching routine you can do in the office

Lyndi Cohen is an accredited practising dietitian and the founder of the Keep It Real healthy eating program. For more from Lyndi, head to http://www.lyndicohen.com and keepitreal.lyndicohen.com.

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This expert says you need to let go of your 'all or nothing approach' - Body and Soul

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July 30th, 2017 at 11:34 am

The secret to weight loss is 80% diet, 20% exercise is this true? – Star2.com

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Is the 80/20 rule true when it comes to weight loss?

We know that in order to lose weight, its important to watch what you eat and engage in moderate exercise regularly.

But which is more effective at helping you get the body you want diet or exercise?

According to some personal trainers and nutrition experts, the answer is diet. In fact, they believe that 80 per cent of weight loss is the result of making healthy changes to your diet, while the remaining 20 per cent is due to being physically active.

This 80/20 rule, as its commonly called, is indeed accurate, and one that most nutritionists recommend, says Ardyce Yik, a registered naturopath at the Integrated Medicine Institute in Central, Hong Kong.

The key to weight loss is achieving a negative calorie balance, which means taking in fewer calories than you burn.

Decreasing the number of calories you consume is so much more effective than exercising, because it takes a tremendous amount of physical activity to create a calorie deficit, Yik adds.

But I exercise a lot, more than the average person, at least four times a week, you say.

Unfortunately, that doesnt give you a free pass to indulge in a high-calorie diet.

Studies show that exercise alone has a negligible impact on weight loss, Yik explains.

For example, youd need to burn 3,500 calories to lose just 500g of fat. If you relied on exercise alone to lose weight, you would essentially need to run more than 10km each day to lose one pound a week, without increasing your caloric intake.

This is why the 80/20 rule makes sense its easier to cut calories than it is to burn the same amount of calories through exercise.

However, Yik adds that this is a general rule, and one that may work better for some people more than others, since everyone is different.

Monitor your diet but also commit to exercise if you really want to lose weight.

She says that whats more important is to commit to both a healthy diet and regular, moderate exercise if youre looking to shift extra pounds.

Diet and exercise are equally important for weight loss.

Although cutting calories from your diet is easier and more practical than exercising a lot, bear in mind that when you start eating less, your metabolism starts to slow down and your body will resist weight loss. Exercise can counteract this.

I usually recommend a combination of cardiovascular and strength-training exercises about 30 minutes of moderate cardiovascular exercise, four or five times a week, plus two or three strength-training sessions per week.

As for your diet, you should look to slash about 500 calories a day to lose 500g of fat per week.

I always recommend a healthful and varied diet based on whole, unprocessed foods, says Yik.

Ideally, your meals should consist of lean protein, colourful vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds.

If you find that decreasing your caloric intake and exercising regularly isnt helping you achieve your weight loss goals, then you should speak to a nutritionist, dietitian or doctor to investigate and address the underlying causes of your inability to lose weight. South China Morning Post/Sasha Gonzales

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The secret to weight loss is 80% diet, 20% exercise is this true? - Star2.com

Written by grays

July 30th, 2017 at 11:34 am

Posted in Diet and Exercise

Tai Chi for people with dementia – European Pharmaceutical Review

Posted: July 12, 2017 at 9:47 am


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news

A new research project is encouraging people with dementia to take up tai chi.

The project, called The TACIT Trial: Tai ChI for people with demenTia, aims to test whether tai chi is of benefit to people with dementia, and of benefit for their carers.

Dr Samuel Nyman, a NIHR Career Development Fellow at Bournemouth University, is leading the study. He said, For those taking part in the TACIT Trial, they will be helping with an exciting research area; this is the first trial of Tai Chi with people with dementia in the UK. It is also the first trial in the world to include assessments to see how Tai Chi might help with people with dementias balance and help prevent them from falling.

The trial is now recruiting, looking for people with dementia and their carers to sign up to further research, and to reap the health benefits that tai chi can provide.

Dr Nyman continues, Tai Chi is something a few years ago people may not have heard anything about. Tai Chi is particularly suited for people with dementia given it is highly accessible anyone can do it! Because it is very slow, gentle, and repetitive, people of all shapes and sizes and different abilities can do it. Even just by doing the very easy warm-up moves you can benefit from it.

From a pilot study we did in 2016, participants were telling us they felt stronger and more confident to go out of the house on their own or to do gardening, feeling better from having done exercise, and a sense of achievement of having learnt something new.

The aim is for researchers to better understand the benefits that tai chi can bring. Participants will be asked to undertake a 20 week tai chi exercise programme under the watch of Bournemouth Universitys research team, while others, part of a control group, will be asked to continue with their normal NHS treatment. Participants will then be compared to see if tai chi can have positive effects for people with dementia.

Dr Nyman concludes, It is a very slow, gentle, calming form of exercise. By slowing down moving slowly and taking slightly longer breaths it is very relaxing and a real de-stressor. It also helps build up strength and coordination that we lose over the years. The course is very easy to follow with lots of repetition. In fact thats why we called it TACIT; were building on peoples tacit memory things you learn by repetition and then do automatically and people with dementia tend to retain this ability very well despite difficulties with other types of memory.

Classes will be held across the south from Dorset and Southampton to Eastleigh and Portsmouth.

http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/tai-chi

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Tai Chi for people with dementia - European Pharmaceutical Review

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July 12th, 2017 at 9:47 am

Posted in Diet and Exercise

Diet and Fitness Tips & Articles | Health Info | Walgreens

Posted: July 21, 2016 at 11:48 pm


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Diet Basics A Secret Benefit of Exercise: Better Blood Sugar

Physical activity keeps your blood sugar steady. Learn the best ways to exercise with these tips. Read more

How to reduce stress and anxiety this holiday season? Follow these 12 tips for taking care of you. Read more

Seven healthy habits to boost your immune system and other ways to prevent cold and flu germs this season. Read more

It's just what your grandma has been telling you for years: To stay cold- and flu-free, eat up! These eight foods naturally boost your immune system to help your body fight off illnesses. Read more

It's just what your grandma has been telling you for years: To stay cold- and flu-free, eat up! These eight foods naturally boost your immune system to help your body fight off illnesses. Read more

A well-balanced diet is an important part of your child's development, but getting them to make nutritious choices isn't always easy in a junk-food focused world. Follow these simple steps to help your child form healthy eating habits! Read more

The essential nutrients Americans need to improve healthplus should you take a multivitamin? Read more

From fending off germs to boosting your brainpower, these superfoods will help you tackle the worldor at least your to-do list. Read more

Declare battle against the bulge: Learn why abdominal fat poses a danger to your health, and how to shed the pounds that matter most. Read more

Overwhelmed when it comes to nutrition? Our registered dietitian will help you build a delicious, health-boosting diet that you will want to stick with. Read more

You are what you eat, and a healthy body starts with a healthy diet. Here are 9 unhealthy foods to cut way back on or nix from your diet entirely. Read more

Slim down and still get the nutrients you need. Read more

The New Year is a great time to take a second look at the supplements you take. Read more

Identify your eating traps and keep off holiday pounds while still having fun. Read more

Practice healthy eating this Thanksgiving with our tips for people with diabetes, GERD, celiac disease, and weight control concerns. Read more

See what all the fuss about probiotics is about, and whether they can have a positive impact on your health. Read more

Enjoy the flavors of the seasonbut not all of the calorieswith these simple tweaks to your go-to festive foods. Read more

Nutrition exert Rachel Meltzer MS, RD offers up six simple fixes to lighten up your holiday meal, without losing any of the flavor. Read more

Many types of cancers can be prevented. Read on to learn about hot you stay cancer-free. Read more

Pack healthier school lunches for your kids and help them make nutritious choices throughout the day. Read more

Want to lose weight? Here are 12 steps to get you started. Read more

Celebrate the warmth of the season with these 10 healthy summer recipes! Read more

If you've stepped on the scale only to find that the needle won't budge, it may be time to make some changes to you health and fitness routine. Here are 10 tips to get the scale moving again. Read more

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We've got a week's worth of expert-approved food and fitness tips to keep your ticker in tip-top shape. Read more

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Breathe new life into your fitness routine with these fresh workout swaps. Read more

Can a wearable device improve your health? Here are a few tips to help you decide. Read more

Let that treadmill collect dust without guilt. Studies show exercising outdoors makes you happier and healthier. Read more

Get 5k-ready in just 8 weeks with our training planplus 5 rules every beginner runner should know. Read more

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Stay on top of your exercise goals by tracking your workouts. Read more

You've heard it before: moving your body is good for you. But if you still haven't been convinced enough to move around, read on for 10 ways exercise can give you super human abilities. Read more

Get in step with all the benefits and rewards a simple walk gives you. Here's how to get started. Read more

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Written by grays

July 21st, 2016 at 11:48 pm

Posted in Diet and Exercise

Exercise Videos – Expert Diet Plan Reviews

Posted: May 1, 2016 at 2:43 pm


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Exercise is an important part of any diet plan and it doesnt matter so much what exercises are done as long as the dieter is getting their heart rate up and moving.

Furthermore, one doesnt have to join an expensive gym or hire a personal trainer to get results. There are many great exercises that can be done in the privacy of the dieters home with very little or any equipment required.

Weve compiled some good exercise videos that target some core areas and all of these exercises can be done outside the gym.

These Videos are courtesy of Diet.com and they have an extensive exercise video collection available for free on YouTube.com

PINK Method : A DVD and Nutrition plan made just for women.

The Tracy Anderson Method. An exercise based diet that helps you achieve a dancers body.

Beginner Runners Diet Run Your Butt Off! is a beginner runners diet that provides dietary advice and outlines a progressive running program designed for beginners that can help you to lose ten to twelve pounds within twelve weeks.

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Exercise Videos - Expert Diet Plan Reviews

Written by simmons

May 1st, 2016 at 2:43 pm

Menopause Diet, Nutritional Facts

Posted: April 27, 2016 at 3:43 pm


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What to include and what to avoid in your menopause diet. Research shows that what women eat can either reduce or exacerbate most menopausal symptoms.

One of the most distressing symptoms of menopause is weight gain. Did you know that six small healthy meals per day can be the secret to maintaining weight control? Only some women can manage this, however, but it is worth trying. If you cant maintain it and have a problem defining small, revert back to three meals per day with smaller portions than those you are used to.

Whilst HRT and natural therapies can help with symptoms of menopause, diet and exercise can go a long way to winning the battle, in fact women who follow a healthy diet and exercise may deal far better with menopause and protect themselves against diseases such as heart disease.

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Here is a quick reminder of the importance of maintaining a healthy Body Mass Index (BMI)

If your BMI is less than 18.4 you are underweight for your height. If your BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9 you are an ideal weight for your height. If your BMI is between 25 and 29.9 you are overweight for your height. If your BMI is between 30 and 39.9 you are obese. If your BMI is over 40 you are very obese.

A BMI of 25 or higher can be associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Losing 10-15 pounds can help to lower blood pressure and reduce your risk of diabetes.

If your BMI is over 30, you need to take immediate action to change your lifestyle in order to lose weight.

Weight distribution is also very important, your waist (just above your naval) should measure below 35 inches.

Research has found that menopausal women who follow a mediterranean diet including whole grain pasta and healthy fats cut their risk of hot flushes and night sweats by about 20%.

Menopausal women who eat diets high in sugar and saturated trans-fats increase their risk by 23%.

Research has shown that trans fats increase bad cholesterol and decrease good cholesterol too much can also have an effect on memory loss and concentration difficulties both of which are well known menopause symptoms.

Your menopause diet needs to contain a variety of foods to ensure that you get all the nutrients (vitamins and minerals) that you need.

FACT If you take in fewer calories than your burn for a long period of time you will lose weight.

Low glycemic carbs whole grain breads, cereals, pasta, all promote energy.

Plant based foods (phytoestrogens) work in the body like a weak form of estrogen and may help to relieve symptoms such as hot flushes and night sweats although research into this remains contradictory soy. linseeds, flaxseed, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, celery, rhubarb, green beans.

Consuming four tablespoons of ground flaxseed daily, 2 in the morning and 2 at night may decrease your frequency of hot flushes. Flaxseeds are packed with lignan. Many leading nutritionists think that the combination of fibre, essential fatty acids, protein and lignan help with inflammation and ward off potential heart problems.

Calcium (vital for bone health) found in dairy products, fish with bones, broccoli and legumes.

Iron found in red meat (lean), poultry, fish, eggs, leafy vegetables, nuts and enriched grain produce.

Protein found in meat, dairy products, nuts, beans and lentils. As we age we need enough protein as it plays a vital role in helping your body recover from illness, infections and surgery. Protein helps to constantly build cells so that your body can stay young and maintain a healthy weight

Fibre found in whole grain produce, broccoli, cereals, pasta, rice, fresh fruit and vegetables.

Fruit and vegetables 5 portions per day.

8 glasses of water per day is the recommended requirement for healthy adults.

Omega 3 fatty acids include essential fatty acids that are critical to your health, good food sources include cold-water fish, flaxseed, soy and walnuts.

Flaxseed is a good menopause diet food Low-fat dairy products Soy products such as soy milk and tofu Seeds such as linseeds, flaxseed Oily fish such as salmon, sardines Vegetables Olive oil, canola oil Fruit Wholegrain cereals, pasta and rice Wholegrain bread Nuts Legumes (beans and lentils) Eggs, fish and lean meat Green tea, herbal tea Water

Dr Sarah Brewer is the author of a book entitled Menopause Diet: How to Eat to Beat Hot Flashes. Dr Brewer is one of the few doctors who is also a Registered Nutritionist and a Registered Nutritional Therapist. She explains how certain foods can help with menopause symptoms. All of Dr Brewers advice is evidence-based. You can read my personal review of Menopause Diet: How to Eat to Beat Hot Flashes here.

Processed foods refined carbs such as white bread, rice, pasta and potatoes release glucose into the bloodstream quickly which can lead to high-low mood swings, weight gain, obesity, insulin resistance, fatigue and many other diet related diseases.

Reduce foods high in saturated fat fatty meats, whole milk, ice cream, cheese. (Limit saturated fat to less than 7% of your total daily calories as these raise cholesterol and increase your risk of heart disease).

Reduce foods high in trans fats vegetable oils, baked produce, some margarines, cakes, pizza etc (Fat should provide 25% 35% or less of your total daily calories).

Use sugar and salt in moderation too much sodium is linked to high blood pressure. Salt and processed carbohydrates will make you retain water which will give you that menopause bloating feeling.

Avoid foods containing high levels of nitrates found in smoked produce, salt-cured produce and charbroiled foods. (High levels of nitrates have been linked to cancer)

Alcohol consumption women should limit alcohol to one or fewer drinks per day. As well as increasing hot flushes, alcohol also affects your sleep, mood and weight. Heavy consumption can also lead to osteoporosis as alcohol prevents cells from building new bone. Trigger Foods to Avoid in your Menopause Diet

If you are experiencing hot flushes, avoiding certain trigger foods and beverages may help, such as:-

Spicy foods Caffeine Alcohol Tea Dark chocolate

Try decaffeinated coffee instead and herbal teas.

(If you suffer from Celiac Disease or have a gluten sensitivity you will need to obtain dietary advice from your healthcare professional).

If you are not already eating 6 small meals a day containing healthy foods, now is the time to start. Eating the right diet little and often will help to banish cravings by keeping your blood sugar and hormones levels in check throughout the day.

Dont forget to treat yourself now and again!

You will find more valuable nutritional information and advice here.

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Sources:

Diet, nutrition and the menopause. Retrieved on 16 September 2015 from http://www.womens-health-concern.org/help-and-advice/factsheets/focus-series/diet-nutrition-menopause/ Meltzer Warren, R. MS. RD. 8 Diet Changes Women Must Make After 40. Retrieved on 16 September 2015 from http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20404740,00.html Menopause. Retrieved on 16 September 2015 from http://www.nutrition.org.uk/healthyliving/lifestages/menopause.html

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Menopause Diet, Nutritional Facts

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April 27th, 2016 at 3:43 pm

Diet & Exercise | CarolWrightGifts.com

Posted: April 6, 2016 at 6:46 pm


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Carol Wright Gifts is your trusted source for high-quality, affordable products to support your health and beauty. In addition to our popular product categories of foot care, incontinence, blood pressure monitors, arthritis and pain relief, diabetic supplies, and sexual health, among others, were also a great resource for beauty and skincare products. Some of our most popular beauty and skincare items include moisturizers and cleansers, wrinkle reducers and skin firming, skin first aid and medical issues, and cosmetics and makeup help.

Foot care products at Carol Wright Gifts are designed to help you take a step in the right direction for better foot health. From in-shoe supports to skin and nail health and therapeutic items for conditions such as bunions and calluses, youll find a variety of products and solutions at great value.

Incontinence affects millions of people and can be a result of age, illness, or post-surgery. Carol Wright offers personal incontinence solutions for men and women as well as waterproof furniture covers and pads.

Blood pressure is an important indicator of overall health as well as an important marker for the risk of a variety of diseases and health conditions. At Carol Wright, we offer a variety of bicep and wrist blood pressure monitors designed to make the process easy and accurate for better health management.

Whether you shop our catalog or our website, Carol Wright Gifts is your source for products to address and relieve arthritis pain. While over-the-counter and prescription pain medicines can provide relief, there are many other options to help reduce arthritis pain, including: topical relief, heating/cooling products, massagers and joint support.

Whether you suffer from type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, Carol Wright has a host of products to help keep you healthy, including diabetic socks, glucose monitoring supplies and skin care products.

We want to help you eat healthy, feel healthy and be healthy. We offer customers of all ages a vast collection of nutritional supplements, diet aids and exercise accessories to help you reach your health and fitness goals. Many of our exercise products are perfect for persons with limited mobility.

Our online healthcare catalog is packed with items to help you see better, hear better and enjoy healthy teeth and gums. Check out our giant selection of readers in a variety of colors and styles at great prices. Our hearing aids and sound amplifiers ensure you wont miss a sound. And our dental collection includes items for denture and appliance care as well as tools and accessories for good oral health.

Discover our selection of scissors and groomers, handy manicure and pedicure sets, hair products, hair growth treatments, shaving products and more.

Reading glasses are some of our most popular items at Carol Wright Gifts. Men and women will find quality readers made with high-impact lenses, sturdy frames and spring hinges for a comfortable fit. Most of our readers are available in sets of three or four, so you get several styles and colors to match your clothing, mood or activity.

Carol Wright Gifts believes sexual health is vital to overall health and wellness, so we offer a wide range of products for men and women. Youll find popular and unique items including massagers, gels and oils, supplements and how-to DVDs.

We offer many products and solutions to help keep your skin as healthy, young-feeling and as good-looking as possible. When it comes to skin care both everyday care and responding to illness or damage look to Carol Wright and our wide variety of options to care for your bodys largest organ.

We understand your priorities youre looking for health and beauty products that are effective, high quality and a great value. At Carol Wright Gifts, thats what we deliver. No matter what type of health and beauty products you need, well make the shopping process easy and convenient. Our Customer Service Representatives are ready to help you find just what you need, via telephone, mail, fax, email or even online live chat. When youre ready to order, use our catalog quick shop or search CarolWrightGifts.com to find products to meet your individual needs. You can also choose to shop from our Virtual Catalog to bring the catalog shopping experience to your computer, page by page. No matter how you shop Carol Wright, your satisfaction is our top priority. If for any reason you are not 100% satisfied with any product you purchase from us, you may return it for a prompt refund.

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Diet & Exercise | CarolWrightGifts.com

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April 6th, 2016 at 6:46 pm


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