Page 21234..1020..»

Archive for the ‘Buddhism’ Category

Meditation and Modern Buddhism in Seattle – KMC Washington

Posted: October 27, 2015 at 8:43 am


without comments

Kadampa Meditation Center Washington offers drop-in classes and retreats for meditation and modern Buddhism in Seattle and the Puget Sound. Meditation classes are offered at the Temple in Ballard on Sunday mornings, Monday evenings and Thursday evenings. We also offer a Learning to Meditate lunchtime class on Mondays. These classes are suitable for all individuals whatever their level of interest, from those who seek simple relaxation to those who wish to find lasting inner peace and contentment through following the Buddhist path. Classes in Buddhism and meditation are also offered at over a dozen locations in the greater Seattle area, such as Bellevue, South Seattle, Anacortes and West Seattle. The Temple hosts a variety of special events, meditation retreats, and provides regular visiting hours. Kadampa Meditation Center Washington was founded by Geshe Kelsang Gyatso as a non-profit organization and member of the New Kadampa Tradition International Kadampa Buddhist Union.

Compassion alone is not enough; we need to balance it with wisdom. In Buddhism, compassion and wisdom are seen as complementary and equally necessary for helping others effectively.Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, Transform Your Life

Since it is impossible to fulfill all our desires or to stop unwanted things from happening to us, we need to find a different way of relating to frustrated desires and unwanted occurrences. We need to learn patient acceptance.Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, How to Solve Our Human Problems

By training our mind to recognize the spiritual lessons in all our experiences, we can come to view everyone and everything as our Spiritual Teacher, and we can turn any and every situation to our advantage. This is a very important understanding for it means that no experience is ever wasted.Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, Eight Steps to Happiness

Read the rest here:
Meditation and Modern Buddhism in Seattle - KMC Washington

Written by simmons

October 27th, 2015 at 8:43 am

Posted in Buddhism

Buddhism Seattle – Diamond Way Buddhist Center Seattle

Posted: at 8:43 am


without comments

Diamond Way Buddhist Center in Seattle is one of 600 meditation centers established by Lama Ole Nydahl according to the wishes of H.H. the 16 Karmapa. The centers are now enjoying spiritual guidance of H.H. the 17th Karmapa Trinley Thaye Dorje, the current head of the 1000-years old Karma Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism.

Diamond Way Centers are non-monastic and western in style, yet rooted in the lineage of oral transmission going back to historical Buddha Shakyamuni 2500 years ago.

We do a guided 16th Karmapa meditation on Wednesdays and Sundays at 8:00 pm, proceeded by a short introductory talk about Diamond Way and Buddhism in general. There is no need to call or email in advance but you can surely do so if you have questions.

There is always someone in the Center a couple minutes before 8:00, waiting downstairs to let you in. If you come a little early or a little late, just use the door bell or call the center number (206.452.1985) and we'll let you in. The entrance is from Western Ave, next to the brewery/bar (and not the back alley even if that's what the GPS may think).

H.H. 16th Karmapa Rangjung Rigpe Dorje

H.H. 17th Karmapa Trinlay Thaye Dorje

Lama Ole Nydahl & Hannah Nydahl

Read more:
Buddhism Seattle - Diamond Way Buddhist Center Seattle

Written by simmons

October 27th, 2015 at 8:43 am

Posted in Buddhism

KMC New York | What is Buddhism?

Posted: October 25, 2015 at 11:46 am


without comments

Who was Buddha? In general, Buddha means Awakened One, someone who has awakened from the sleep of ignorance and sees things as they really are. A Buddha is a person who is completely free from all faults and mental obstructions. Introduction to Buddhism

The founder of Buddhism in this world was Buddha Shakyamuniwho lived and gave teachings in India some two and a half thousand years ago. Since then millions of people around world have followed the spiritual path he revealed.The Buddhist way of life of peace, loving kindness and wisdom can be just as relevant today as it was in ancient India.Buddha explained that all our problems and suffering arise from confused and negative states of mind, and that all our happiness and good fortune arise from peaceful and positive states of mind.

Buddha taught methods for gradually overcoming our negative minds such as anger, jealousy and ignorance, and developing our positive minds such as love, compassion and wisdom. Through this we can come to experience lasting peace and happiness.

These methods can work for anyone, in any country, in any age. Once we have gained experience of them for ourselves we can pass them on to others so they too can enjoy the same benefits.

Meditation is at the heart of the Buddhist way of life. It is essentially a method for understanding and working on our own mind. We first learn to identify our different negative mental states known as delusions, and learn how to develop peaceful and positive mental states or virtuous minds.

During meditation we overcome our delusions by becoming familiar with these virtuous minds. During the meditation break, when we are out of meditation, we try to maintain the virtuous minds we have developed and use our wisdom to solve the problems of daily life.

As our mind becomes more positive our actions become more constructive, and our experience of life becomes more satisfying and beneficial to others.

Anyone can learn basic meditation techniques and experience great benefits, but to progress beyond basic meditation requires faith in the Three Jewels Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. Usually people find this develops naturally as they experience the benefits of their meditation practice.

We dont need to change our activities; we just need to change our mind. Busy lives are perfect conditions for practicing Dharma and training our mind. Our work and family, for example, are ideal places to reduce our attachment and self-cherishing and improve our cherishing of others.

With practical Dharma methods in our heart, we will be more prepared for any challenges that may arise and actually be able to grow from the different circumstances we encounter. We will also be able to spread joy and peace to others.

Kadampa Buddhism is a Mahayana Buddhist school founded by the great Indian Buddhist Master Atisha (AD 9821054). His followers are known as Kadampas.

Kadampa Buddhists are encouraged to use Buddhas teachings as practical methods for transforming daily activities into the spiritual path. Kadam Dharma accords with peoples daily experience; it cannot be separated from daily life.

Over 1,200 Kadampa Buddhist Centers and groups in over 30 countries offer study programs on Buddhist psychology, philosophy, and meditation instruction, as well as retreats for all levels of practitioner. The emphasis is on integrating Buddhas teachings into daily life to solve our human problems and to spread lasting peace and happiness throughout the world.

Here is the original post:
KMC New York | What is Buddhism?

Written by simmons

October 25th, 2015 at 11:46 am

Posted in Buddhism

What is Buddhism | About Buddhism

Posted: at 11:46 am


without comments

The founder of Buddhism was Buddha Shakyamuni who lived and taught in India some two and a half thousand years ago. Since then millions of people around the world have followed the pure spiritual path he revealed. The Buddhist way of life of peace, loving kindness and wisdom is just as relevant today as it was in ancient India. Buddha explained that all our problems and suffering arise from confused and negative states of mind, and that all our happiness and good fortune arise from peaceful and positive states of mind. He taught methods for gradually overcoming our negative minds such as anger, jealousy and ignorance, and developing our positive minds such as love, compassion and wisdom. Through this we will come to experience lasting peace and happiness. These methods work for anyone, in any country, in any age. Once we have gained experience of them for ourselves we can pass them on to others so they too can enjoy the same benefits.

Meditation is at the heart of the Buddhist way of life. It is basically a method for understanding and working on our own mind. We first learn to identify our different negative mental states known as delusions, and learn how to develop peaceful and positive mental states or virtuous minds.

Then in meditation we overcome our delusions by becoming familiar with virtuous minds. Out of meditation we try to maintain the virtuous minds we have developed and use our wisdom to solve the problems of daily life. As our mind becomes more positive our actions become more constructive, and our experience of life becomes more satisfying and beneficial to others.

Anyone can learn basic meditation techniques and experience great benefits, but to progress beyond basic meditation requires faith in the Three Jewels Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. Usually people find this develops naturally as they experience the benefits of their meditation practice.

The teachings of Buddha reveal a step by step path to lasting happiness. By following this path anyone can gradually transform his or her mind from its present confused and self-centered state into the blissful mind of a Buddha.

As Geshe Kelsang says in his popular book Eight Steps to Happiness:

Every living being has the potential to become a Buddha, someone who has completely purified his or her mind of all faults and limitations and has brought all good qualities to perfection. Our mind is like a cloudy sky, in essence clear and pure but overcast by the clouds of delusions.

Just as the thickest clouds eventually disperse, so too even the heaviest delusions can be removed from our mind. Delusions such as hatred, greed, and ignorance are not an intrinsic part of the mind. If we apply the appropriate methods they can be completely eliminated, and we shall experience the supreme happiness of full enlightenment.

Having attained enlightenment we shall have all the necessary qualities universal love and compassion, omniscient wisdom and boundless spiritual power to lead all living beings to the same exalted state. This is the ultimate aim of Mahayana Buddhism.

To find out more about basic Buddhism, read Introduction to Buddhism by Geshe Kelsang Gyatso.

View post:
What is Buddhism | About Buddhism

Written by simmons

October 25th, 2015 at 11:46 am

Posted in Buddhism

Sacred Texts: Buddhism

Posted: at 11:46 am


without comments

Sacred-texts home Journal Articles: Buddhism OCRT: Buddhism Buy CD-ROM Buy Books about Buddhism Modern works Southern Buddhism Northern Buddhism Jataka Links Modern works

The Gospel of Buddha: Compiled from Ancient Records by Paul Carus [1909] A modern retelling of the Buddha's work and life.

Buddha, the Word by Paul Carus

Amitabha by Paul Carus [1906] Buddhist concepts of God, non-violence, and religious tolerance.

The Buddhist Catechism by Henry S. Olcott (42nd. ed.) [1908] A unity platform for Buddhists, drawn up by Buddhism's first modern western convert.

The Creed of Buddha by Edmond Holmes (2nd. ed.) [1919] A Pantheist looks at contemporary Western views of Buddhism.

The Life of Buddha by Andre Ferdinand Herold [1922], tr. by Paul C. Blum [1927] A good introduction to the life and works of Buddha.

A Buddhist Bible by Dwight Goddard (1st ed.) [1932] An edited (but not watered-down) collection of key Zen documents, a favorite of Jack Kerouac. This anthology has had a huge influence on the spread of Buddhism in the English-speaking world.

The Smokey the Bear Sutra by Gary Snyder. A much beloved short poem about the relationship between Buddhism and ecology, written by one of the 'beat' era poets, simultaneously funny and profound.

The Dhammapada and The Sutta Nipta (SBE10), Dhammapada tr. by Max Mller; Sutta-Nipta tr. by V. Fausbll [1881]

Buddhist Suttas (SBE11) Translated from Pli by T.W. Rhys Davids [1881]

Vinaya Texts (Part I) (SBE13) Translated from the Pli by T.W. Rhys Davids and Herman Oldenberg. [1881] The Ptimokkha and The Mahvagga, I-IV.

Vinaya Texts (Part II) (SBE17) Translated from the Pli by T.W. Rhys Davids and Herman Oldenberg. [1882] The Mahvagga, V-X, and The Kullavagga, I-III.

Vinaya Texts (Part III) (SBE20) Translated from the Pli by T.W. Rhys Davids and Herman Oldenberg. [1885] The Kullavagga, IV-XII.

The Questions of King Milinda translated by T. W. Rhys Davids The Questions of King Milinda, Part I (SBE35) [1890] The Questions of King Milinda, Part II (SBE36) [1894]

Dialogues of the Buddha (The Dgha-Nikya) Translated from the Pli by T.W. Rhys Davids; London, H. Frowde, Oxford University Press [1899] Volume II of the Sacred Books of the Buddhists.

Buddhism in Translations by Henry Clarke Warren [1896] A often-cited scholarly anthology of translations of key Theravada Buddhist documents. (thanks to Chris Weimer)

The Udna Translated by Dawsonne Melanchthon Strong [1902] (thanks to Chris Weimer)

Psalms of the Sisters by Caroline A. F. Rhys Davids [1909] (Thanks to Mary Mark Ockerbloom of A Celebration of Women Writers)

The Buddha's Way of Virtue tr. by W.D.C. Wagiswara and K.J. Saunders [1920] A translation of the Dhammapada, one of the central Buddhist sacred texts.

The Jataka is a huge collection of fables framed as previous incarnations of the Buddha, many of which either have parallels or derivatives in western folklore and literature. Although the Jataka is not considered part of the canonical Buddhist scripture, it is very popular. Each tale usually has a concise moral, and the entire collection is a browsers' delight.

The Jataka, Vol. I tr. by Robert Chalmers ed. E.B. Cowell [1895] The first of six volumes of the complete Cowell translation of the Jataka.

The Jataka, Vol. II tr. by W. H. D. Rouse ed. E.B. Cowell [1895] The second of six volumes of the complete Cowell translation of the Jataka.

The Jataka, Vol. III tr. by H.T. Francis, ed. E.B. Cowell [1897] The third of six volumes of the complete Cowell translation of the Jataka.

The Jataka, Vol. IV tr. by W.H.D. Rouse, ed. E.B. Cowell [1901] The fourth of six volumes of the complete Cowell translation of the Jataka.

The Jataka, Vol. V tr. by H.T. Francis, ed. E.B. Cowell [1905] The fifth of six volumes of the complete Cowell translation of the Jataka.

The Jataka, Vol. VI tr. by E.B. Cowell, and W.H.D. Rouse [1907] The sixth and final volume of the complete Cowell translation of the Jataka.

Indian Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs [1912] A collection of Indian folklore, retold for younger readers 'of all ages', includes many stories from the Jataka, a Buddhist compilation of fables.

Jataka Tales by Ellen C. Babbit [1912] A collection of Jataka stories, fables about previous incarnations of the Buddha, usually as an animal, retold for younger readers.

Buddhist Scriptures by E. J. Thomas [1913] A short collection of Buddhist scripture, from the Wisdom of the East series.

The Fo-Sho-Hing-Tsan-King (SBE19) A Life of Buddha by Asvaghosha Bodhisattva, translated from Sanskrit into Chinese by Dharmaraksha A.D. 420, and From Chinese into English by Samuel Beal [1883]

Buddhist Mahyna Texts (SBE 49) [1894] Translated by E.B. Cowell, F. Max Mller, and J. Kakakusu. Includes the Diamond Sutra.

Saddharma-pundarka (The Lotus Sutra) (SBE 21) tr. by H. Kern [1884]

She-rab Dong-bu (The Tree of Wisdom) by Nagarjuna; edited and translated by W. L. Cambell [1919] An influential Tibetan Buddhist text.

Esoteric Teachings of the Tibetan Tantra edited and translated by C.A. Muss [1961] Includes Seven Initation Rituals of the Tibetan Tantra, the Six Yogas of Naropa, plus the Vow of Mahamudra.

Avaghosha's Discourse on the Awakening of Faith in the Mahyna tr. by Teitaro Suzuki [1900]

The Awakening of Faith of Ashvagosha tr. by Timothy Richard [1907]

The Path of Light tr. by L.D. Barnett [1909] A translation of the Bodhicharyavatara of Santideva, a key Mahayana Buddhist text.

The Gateless Gate by Ekai [Huikai], called Mu-mon, tr. by Nyogen Senzaki and Paul Reps [1934] One of the classic collections of Zen Buddhist Koans.

Chinese Buddhism by Joseph Edkins [1893] A comprehensive discussion of Chinese Buddhism.

Buddhism In Tibet by Emil Schlaginteweit [1863] One of the few 19th century books about Tibetan Buddhism.

The Religion of the Samurai by Kaiten Nukariya [1913] This book focuses on Northern (Mahayana) Buddhism, and Zen Buddhism in particular. It includes a wealth of detail as well as very lucid explanations of Zen Buddhist concepts.

Shinran and His Work: Studies in Shinshu Theology by Arthur Lloyd [1910] A Christian scholar explores Shinshu Buddhism. Includes text and translation of the Shoshinge of Shinran Shonen, with extended commentary.

The Creed of Half Japan by Arthur Lloyd [1911] A comprehensive history of Mahayana Buddhism, particularly in Japan, and possible ties to Gnosticism and early Christianity. Includes two translated texts from the Nichiren school.

Principal Teachings of the True Sect of Pure Land by Yejitsu Okusa [1915] The history and practice of Pure Land Buddhism in Japan.

Buddhist Psalms by S. Yamabe and L. Adams Beck [1921] A key Pure Land text, by the founder of the most popular form of Buddhism in Japan.

Manual of Zen Buddhism by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. [1935] An anthology of texts relating to Zen. Suzuki was one of the most popular 20th century writers about Zen Buddhism. Includes the famous 'Ox-Herder' illustrations.

Zen for Americans by Soyen Shaku, translated by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. [1906] A collection of essays on Buddhism. Includes The Sutra of Forty-Two Chapters.

Mysticism, Christian and Buddhist by Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki. [1957, not renewed] Suzuki compares and contrasts Buddhism with Meister Eckhart's mystical outlook.

Gleanings In Buddha-Fields by Lafcadio Hearn [1897].

The N Plays of Japan by Arthur Waley [1921]. Translations of a selection of N dramas, which have deep connections with Japanese Buddhism, Shinto, and Japanese folklore.

Buddhism and Immortality by William Sturgis Bigelow [1908]. A essay on Karma and Nirvana in the light of Darwin and Emerson.

India in Primitive Christianity by Arthur Lillie [1909]. What are the links between Buddhism and early Christianity?

The Way to Nirvana by L. de la Valle Poussin [1917]. Investigating Buddhist thought on rebirth and transcendence.

KAKUZO OKAKURA The Book of Tea by Kakuzo Okakura [1906] The aesthetics of the Japanese Tea Ceremony, and its connection to the Japanese world-view as a whole. The Ideals of the East by Kakuzo Okakura [1904] The evolution of Japanese art and its relationship to Buddhism.

Journal Articles about Buddhism A collection of academic journal articles about Buddhism from the 19th Century.

These are collections of files harvested from the Internet on these popular Buddhist topics: Tibetan Buddhism: Archives Zen Buddhism: Archives

For more translations of Southern Buddhist texts, we highly recommend Access to Insight [External Site].

Visit link:
Sacred Texts: Buddhism

Written by simmons

October 25th, 2015 at 11:46 am

Posted in Buddhism

Buddhism – LeaderU.com

Posted: at 11:46 am


without comments

For centuries, Buddhism has been the dominant religion of the Eastern world. Today it remains the predominant religion in China, Japan, Korea, and much of southeast Asia. With the rise of the Asian population in the U.S., Buddhism has made a tremendous impact in the United States. Presently, there are over 300,000 Buddhists in the U.S. It remains the dominant religion in the state of Hawaii and many prominent Americans have accepted this religion, including the former governor of California, Jerry Brown.(1)

Buddhism began as an offspring of Hinduism in the country of India. The founder was Siddhartha Gautama. It is not easy to give an accurate historical account of the life of Gautama, since no biography was recorded until hundreds of years after his death. Today, much of his life story is clouded in myths and legends which arose after his death. Even the best historians of our day have several different--and even contradictory--accounts of Gautama's life.

Siddhartha Gautama was born in approximately 560 B.C. in northern India. His father Suddhodana was the ruler over a district near the Himalayas which is today the country of Nepal. Suddhodana sheltered his son from the outside world and confined him to the palace where he surrounded Gautama with pleasures and wealth. Despite his father's efforts, Gautama one day saw the darker side of life on a trip he took outside the palace walls.

He saw four things that forever changed his life: an old man, a sick man, a dead man, and a beggar. Deeply distressed by the suffering he saw, he decided to leave the luxury of palace life and begin a quest to find the answer to the problem of pain and human suffering.

Gautama left his family and traveled the country seeking wisdom. He studied the Hindu scriptures under Brahmin priests, but became disillusioned with the teachings of Hinduism. He then devoted himself to a life of extreme asceticism in the jungle. Legend has it that he eventually learned to exist on one grain of rice a day which reduced his body to a skeleton. He soon concluded, however, that asceticism did not lead to peace and self realization but merely weakened the mind and body.

Gautama eventually turned to a life of meditation. While deep in meditation under a fig tree known as the Bohdi tree (meaning, "tree of wisdom"), Gautama experienced the highest degree of God-consciousness called Nirvana. Gautama then became known as Buddha, the "enlightened one." He believed he had found the answers to the questions of pain and suffering. His message now needed to be proclaimed to the whole world.

As he began his teaching ministry, he gained a quick audience with the people of India since many had become disillusioned with Hinduism. By the time of his death at age 80, Buddhism had become a major force in India. Three centuries later it had spread to all of Asia. Buddha never claimed to be deity but rather a "way- shower." However, seven hundred years later, followers of Buddha began to worship him as deity.(2)

The question Gautama, the founder of Buddhism, sought to answer was, Why is there pain and suffering? Also, he held to the Hindu belief of reincarnation: after death one returns to earthly life in a higher or lower form of life according to his good or bad deeds. This belief prompted a second question that needed to be answered, How does one break this rebirth cycle? The basic teachings of Buddhism, therefore, focus on what Gautama believed to be the answer to these questions. These basic tenants are found in the Four Noble Truths and the Eight-fold Path. Let us begin with the Four Noble Truths.

The First Noble Truth is that there is pain and suffering in the world. Gautama realized that pain and suffering are omnipresent in all of nature and human life. To exist means we will all encounter suffering. Birth is painful and so is death. Sickness and old age are painful. Throughout life, all living things encounter suffering.

The Second Noble Truth relates to the cause of suffering. Gautama believed the root cause of suffering is desire. It is the craving for wealth, happiness, and other forms of selfish enjoyment which cause suffering. These cravings can never be satisfied for they are rooted in ignorance.

The Third Noble Truth is the end of all suffering. Suffering will cease when a person can rid himself of all desires.

The Fourth Noble Truth is the extinguishing of all desire by following the eight-fold path. "The eight-fold path is a system of therapy designed to develop habits which will release people from the restrictions caused by ignorance and craving."(3)

Here are the eight steps in following the eight-fold path. The first is the Right Views. One must accept the four noble truths. Step two is the Right Resolve. One must renounce all desires and any thoughts like lust, bitterness, and cruelty. He must harm no living creature. Step three is the Right Speech. One must speak only truth. There can be no lying, slander, or vain talk. Step four is the Right Behavior. One must abstain from sexual immorality, stealing, and all killing.

Step five is the Right Occupation. One must work in an occupation that benefits others and harms no one. Step six is the Right Effort. One must seek to eliminate any evil qualities within and prevent any new ones from arising. One should seek to attain good and moral qualities and develop those already possessed. Seek to grow in maturity and perfection until universal love is attained. Step seven is the Right Contemplation. One must be observant, contemplative, and free of desire and sorrow. The eighth is the Right Meditation. After freeing oneself of all desires and evil, a person must concentrate his efforts in meditation so that he can overcome any sensation of pleasure or pain and enter a state of transcending consciousness and attain a state of perfection. Buddhists believe that through self effort one can attain the state of peace and eternal bliss called Nirvana.

Three important concepts in understanding Buddhism are karma, Samsara, and Nirvana.

Karma refers to the law of cause and effect in a person's life, reaping what one has sown. Buddhists believe that every person must go through a process of birth and rebirth until he reaches the state of nirvana in which he breaks this cycle. According to the law of karma, "You are what you are and do what you do, as a result of what you were and did in a previous incarnation, which in turn was the inevitable outcome of what you were and did in still earlier incarnations."(4) For a Buddhist, what one will be in the next life depends on one's actions in this present life. Buddha believed, unlike Hinduism, that a person can break the rebirth cycle no matter what class he is born into.

The second key concept to understand is the law of Samsara or Transmigration. This is one of the most perplexing and difficult concepts in Buddhism to understand. The law of Samsara holds that everything is in a birth and rebirth cycle. Buddha taught that people do not have individual souls. The existence of an individual self or ego is an illusion. There is no eternal substance of a person which goes through the rebirth cycle. What is it then that goes through the cycle if not the individual soul? What goes through the rebirth cycle is only a set of feelings, impressions, present moments, and the karma that is passed on. "In other words, as one process leads to another, ... so one's human personality in one existence is the direct cause of the type of individuality which appears in the next."(5) The new individual in the next life will not be exactly the same person, but there will be several similarities. Just how close in identity they will be, Buddha did not define.

The third key concept is Nirvana. The term means "the blowing out" of existence. Nirvana is very different from the Christian concept of heaven. Nirvana is not a place like heaven but rather a state of being. What exactly it is, Buddha never really articulated.

Nirvana is an eternal state of being. It is the state in which the law of karma, and the rebirth cycle come to an end. It is the end of suffering, a state where there are no desires and the individual consciousness comes to an end. Although to our Western minds this may sound like annihilation, Buddhists would object to such a notion. Gautama never gave an exact description of Nirvana, but his closest reply was this. "There is disciples, a condition, where there is neither earth nor water, neither air nor light, neither limitless space, nor limitless time, neither any kind of being, neither ideation nor non-ideation, neither this world nor that world. There is neither arising nor passing-away, nor dying, neither cause nor effect, neither change nor standstill."(6) Although no Buddhist really understands the condition of Nirvana, it is their eternal hope.

It may have occurred to the reader that in our discussion thus far no mention has been made of God or an eternal deity. It is clear that Gautama, the founder of Buddhism, did not claim to be divine. He claimed to be the one to point the way to Nirvana, but it was up to each individual to find his own way there.

The concept of a personal God does not fit into the Buddhist system of religion. Today there are many sects of Buddhism. Many differ in their concept of the divine and of Buddha. In general, Buddhists are pantheistic in their view of God. Many view God as an impersonal force which is made up of all living things and holds the universe together.

Here are what some of the most prominent of scholars say of the Buddhist view of God. Dr. John Noss states, "there is no sovereign Person in the heavens holding all together in unity, there is only the ultimate impersonal unity of being itself, whose peace enfolds the individual self when it ceases to call itself 'I' and dissolves in the featureless purity of Nirvana, as a drop of spray is merged in its mother sea."(7)

Here is what the late Dr. Suzuki, one of the greatest teachers of Zen Buddhism, says about his concept of God: "If God after making the world puts Himself outside it, He is no longer God. If He separates Himself from the world or wants to separate Himself, He is not God. The world is not the world when it is separated from God. God must be in the world and the world in God."(8)

Since Buddhism in general does not believe in a personal God or divine being, it does not have worship, praying, or praising of a divine being. It offers no form of redemption, forgiveness, heavenly hope, or final judgment. Buddhism is, therefore, more of a moral philosophy, an ethical way of life.

Professor Kraemer describes the Buddhist system as "a non-theistic ethical discipline, a system of self training, anthropocentric, stressing ethics and mind-culture to the exclusion of theology."(9)

Since Gautama's death, many sects have developed within Buddhism. Many of these sects differ in many fundamental ways and comparing them to one another is like comparing two separate religions. Many sects have developed their own unique concept of God. Some are pantheistic in their view of God. Others are atheistic. Still others have developed a polytheistic system of gods. Some have combined pantheism and polytheism. Several sects have elevated Gautama (or Buddha) to the level of a savior or divine being although it is clear he never claimed to be a deity. Other sects have combined some of the doctrines of God from other religions with Buddhism.

Since Buddha never emphasized his concept of the divine, Buddhism is left with some life's deepest questions unanswered, questions such as the origin of the universe and the purpose of man's existence.

It is quite clear that Christianity and Buddhism differ from one another in fundamental ways. Some sects of Buddhism have tried to synchronize the two together. However, the two are so different, they cannot both be right at the same time, nor can the two be blended together. Here is a comparison of these two religions.

Much of the Buddhist scriptures and sayings attributed to Gautama were written about four hundred years after his death. By the time they were written, Buddhism had split into many sects. What do we have then? Even the best scholars are not sure of the accuracy of the Buddhist scriptures. In Christianity, however, we have an accurate historical account written by eyewitnesses to Jesus and the events surrounding His life.

The two differ in their concept of God. For Buddhists in general, the Absolute does not play a vital role in daily living. Gautama said little about his concept of God. Buddha denied the existence of a personal God but was monistic in his view of the Absolute as an impersonal force made up of all living things. The Bible teaches of a God who rules the universe, and cares for man in a personal way. Psalm 46:10 states, "Be still and know that I am God. I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted among the earth."

It is clear that Buddha never claimed to be deity. Although several sects have elevated him to athe status of a god, he clearly claimed to be only the way-shower to Nirvana. Jesus, however, claimed to be God and not simply a way-shower but instead the only way to eternal life. Jesus said in John 14:6, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." John 1:1 also states, "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God."

There is another clear distinction between these two religions. Buddhism offers neither assurance of forgiveness or eternal life. Buddhists hope to enter into the state of Nirvana, but there is no clear, objective proof or teaching on what occurs beyond the grave. Even Buddha himself was not certain what lay beyond death. He left no clear teaching on Nirvana or eternity. What he did leave are philosophical speculations. Today the body of Buddha lies in a grave in Kusinara, at the foot of the Himalaya Mountains. The facts of life after death still remain an unsolved mystery in Buddhism.

In Christianity we have One who amazed His audience because He taught eternal truths with authority. His authority came from the fact that He existed before creation, and He proved His claims by rising from the dead. The Resurrection of Jesus Christ is a proven fact of history and clearly demonstrates Christ's authority over sin and death. When witnessing to a Buddhist, ask him this: "Do you have tangible proof of what occurs after death?" All the Buddhist has is hope in a teaching Buddha was not sure of. As Christians, we have a certain hope in a risen Savior. There is no guessing what happens beyond the grave because Christ alone has conquered the grave.

1994 Probe Ministries

1. Walter Martin, Kingdom of the Cults (Minneapolis: Bethany House 1985), p. 261.

2. Kenneth Boa, Cults, World Religions, and the Occult (Wheaton: Victor Books, (1977) p. 35.

3. Ibid. p. 32.

4. Davis Taylor and Clark Offner, The World's Religions, Norman Anderson, ed. (Grand Rapids: InterVarsity, 1975), p. 174.

5. John Noss, Man's Religions (New York: Macmillan Company, 1968), p. 182.

6. Taylor & Offner, p. 177.

7. Noss, p. 183.

8. D. T. Suzuki, The Field of Zen (London: The Buddhist Society, 1969), p. 16.

9. Taylor & Offner, p. 177.

Boa, Kenneth. Cults, World Religions, and the Occult. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1977.

Gard, Richard. Buddhism. New York: George Braziller, 1962.

Martin, Walter. The Kingdom of the Cults. Minneapolis: Bethany House, 1985.

_____ The New Cults. Ventura: Regal Books, 1980.

McDowell, Josh and Don Stewart. Handbook of Today's Religions. San Bernadino: Here's Life, 1982.

Noss, John. Man's Religions. New York: Macmillan Company, 1968.

Parrinder, Geoffrey. World Religions From Ancient History to the Present. New York: Facts on File, 1971.

Suzuki, D.T. The Field of Zen. London: Harper and Row, 1969.

_____ The Gospel According to Zen. New York: Mentor Books, 1970.

Read the original:
Buddhism - LeaderU.com

Written by simmons

October 25th, 2015 at 11:46 am

Posted in Buddhism

Welcome to Losel Maitri Tibetan Buddhist Center

Posted: October 21, 2015 at 11:54 am


without comments

Special News! Dalai Lama to visit Birmingham in 2014

Wonderful news! His Holiness the Dalai Lama will be visiting Birmingham in 2014. For the full story, please check the Birmingham News article here:

Dalai Lama set to make pilgrimage to Birmingham in 2014

Book study and practice on Tuesday November 26 is cancelled. Also, the Introduction to Buddhism class on Sunday, December 1 is cancelled (but we will have Sadhana Practice at 2pm).

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

The Sunday Intro to Buddhism Class will be cancelled on November 3rd and 10th. Thanks!

Please join us this Sunday, September 29, at 2pm for tea and cookies instead of our regular Sadhana practice. Please feel free to bring a small dessert or beverage for everyone to enjoy!

The Intro to Buddhism Class will still be held at 1pm. Please come for class and stick around for tea and cookies!

The Introduction to Buddhism Class for this Sunday, September 15 is cancelled. Sadhana practice will still be held at 2pm.

The Introduction to Buddhism Class and Sadhana Practice for this Sunday, September 1 is cancelled. We will resume our regular schedule on Tuesday, September 3rd. Have a good holiday!

Happy 78th Birthday to His Holiness the Dalai Lama!!

Come join us on Saturday, July 6 at 12:30pm for a vegetarian pot luck to celebrate His Holiness's birthday. Please bring any veggie dish, drink or dessert you'd like. Remember to come to our new location, 3224 Green Valley Road.

We are very honored to have Ken McLeod, the author of Wake Up To Your Life, join us this Sunday, May 5th, for a Question and Answer session. We read and discussed this book at length on our Tuesday Book Study, so this is a fantastic opportunity to ask the author any questions you may have.

He will be joining us at 2pm, right after the 1pm Intro to Buddhism class. Please join us for this special occasion!

A couple schedule changes for the next week or so:

Our normal schedule resumes Tuesday February 19.

Please check back for news about the Tibetan New Year!

Here's the Holiday Schedule for Thanksgiving and Christmas. The Buddhism for Beginners class on Sundays at 1pm will not meet until January, but we will still have Sadhana Practice at 2pm on Sundays, except where noted below. Tuesday night services and Book Study will meet throughout all of December, with the exception of Christmas and New Years Day.

Our normal schedule resumes Sunday January 6.

We hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season!

A couple schedule changes for the next week or so:

Our normal schedule resumes Sunday November 11.

We will also be posting our holiday schedule soon, so please check back.

The 1pm class and 2pm Sadhana Practice on Sunday August 5 is cancelled. Normal schedule will resume on Tuesday, August 8th.

Please note the following cancellations to our regular schedule.

We will resume our normal schedule on Sunday August 5.

We are starting to study a new book, How Things Exist: Teachings on Emptiness, by Lama Zopa Rinpoche, during our Tuesday night Book Study. We are very excited to read this book, so we hope you will join us!

Come join us on Sunday, June 8th at 1pm to celebrate the 77th birthday of His Holiness the Dalai Lama! Bring your favorite vegetarian dish and a smile!

We will not have Class or practice on Sunday, May 27. Happy Memorial Day!

We will not have Class or practice on Sunday, April 8. Happy Easter!

Our Tuesday Book Study just finished Wake Up To You Life, by Ken McLeod, and will begin studying His Holiness the Dalai Lama's book Answers: Discussions with Western Buddhists, next week. Please join us as we work through this great book.

The Introduction to Buddhism Class that meets on Sunday will begin using Buddhism for Beginners, by Thubten Chodron, on this Sunday January 22nd. We invite everyone to join us!

We will not be meeting on Sunday, December 25th or Sunday, January 1st. We will still meet on Tuesday, December 27th, and the regular schedule will resume on Tuesday, January 3rd.

Happy Holidays, everyone!

The Intro to Buddhism class and Sadhana Practice on Sunday November 13 is cancelled. We will resume regular schedule on Tuesday, November 15. Thanks!

The Intro to Buddhism class and Sadhana practice on Sunday October 23 is cancelled. Also, Book study and Prayer Services on Tuesday, October 25 are cancelled. We will resume our regular schedule on Sunday, October 30.

After a summer of activity, Losel Maitri has resumed the regular schedule of Book Study and Services on Tuesday nights, and the Intro to Buddhism class and Chenresig Sadhana on Sunday afternoons. We wish everyone a great start to the school year, and will see you soon!

Please see our modified schedule below for July 2011. Due to the July 4th holiday weekend and Lama Deshek attending the Kalachakra in Washington DC, a few of our regular meeting dates are cancelled:

Our regular schedule will resume on Tuesday, July 19 with Book study at 6pm and Services starting at 7pm.

Also, please wish His Holiness the Dalai Lama a happy birthday on July 6. He will be turning 76 years young!

Happy Tibetan New Year 2138!

We are going to celebrate the Tibetan New Year on Sunday, March 6th with a Potluck meal! Please come to the center at 1pm and bring your favorite vegetarian dish. We want to celebrate the New Year of the Rabbit with you, so we hope everyone is able to come.

Due to hazardous weather conditions, we will not meet tonight for Book Study or Services. We will continue our regular schedule on Sunday, January 16.

Please note that Lama Deshek will continue working on the Chenresig Sand Mandala at Birmingham Southern starting tomorrow (Wed, Jan 12) through Friday, and will continue through next week. Please come visit if you can!

We are pleased to announce that the Venerable Lama Tenzin Deshek will be constructing the Chenresig Sand Mandala during the month of January at Birmingham Southern College's Durbin Art Gallery.

Over the course of three weeks, Lama Deshek will use multi-colored sand to create a painting depicting the Mandala of Chenresig, the Bodhisattva of Compassion. Each day, Lama Deshek will spend a few hours working on the painting, and the gallery will be open to the public to watch him construct the mandala as well as view it in progress. Also on display will be a collection of Tibetan Buddhist Thangkas, tapestries depicting Buddhist figures.

On Wednesday, January 5th at 11am, there will be a ceremony to bless the gallery and prepare it for the mandala. Everyone is welcome to attend! After the ceremony, Lama Deshek will begin working on the mandala, which will take approximately 10 days to complete.

After the mandala is completed, it will remain on display until January 27th, when it will be dismantled. More details about the dismantling ceremony will be posted as they become available.

We encourage everyone to visit the Durbin Gallery as much as possible, and we would like to thank Birmingham Southern College for graciously hosting this event.

INFORMATION:

Please check back here often, as we will post more details as they become available.

On Tuesday, December 21st, after our book study, Lama Deshek will offer Refuge, Lay Precepts and Bodhicitta Vows for anyone who wants to make these commitments.

Please see the holiday schedule listed below. We will continue to meet on Tuesdays, but our Sunday schedule will be different. Thank you all for a wonderful year, and many good wishes to you and your families through the holiday season.

Also note that today, December 10th, is the day that His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace prize.

Finally, we have a major event coming up soon, so please check the website often, as we will be posting details shortly.

Please note that we will not meet on Sunday October 17th or Tuesday October 19th due to events with His Holiness the Dalai Lama in Atlanta. We will resume the regular schedule on Sunday, October 24. Thanks!

We had a wonderful birthday party for His Holiness the Dalai Lama last Tuesday, July 6. We were honored to have a delegation of spiritual and religious persons from Sri Lanka join us, and we hope they continue to have a wonderful visit to the United States. Many thanks to everyone who came and brought delicious treats!!

On Tuesday, July 6 at 6:30pm, we will be celebrating the birthday of His Holiness the Dalai Lama by hosting a Party Potluck. Please bring appetizers such as chips, dip, dessert, snacks, sweets, etc., and we look forward to seeing you there!

Our Tuesday book study is now reading Wake Up to Your Life, by Ken McLeod. As always, we will read sections of the book in class and discuss, and we invite everyone to attend!

Happy Tibetan New Year 2137!

We are going to celebrate the Tibetan New Year on Sunday, February 14th with a Potluck meal! Please come to the center at 1pm and bring your favorite vegetarian dish. This is a particularly auspicious occasion this year, as the Tibetan, Mongolian and Chinese New Year all fall on the same day. We want to celebrate the New Year with you, so we hope everyone is able to come.

This past week, our Director the Venerable Lama Tenzin Deshek travelled to Atlanta to take his US Citizenship Test. He passed with flying colors, and is now an official Citizen of the United States of America! This is wonderful news, and we hope that everyone will take a moment to congratulate him on his accomplishment!

In other news, we are planning on holding our regular schedule throughout the holidays. We hope that everyone has a safe and enjoyable season, and look forward to seeing you all at the center.

After finishing up The Joy of Living last week, the Tuesday Book Study will read through the Sadhana of Chenresig, which is the prayer we recite every Sunday at 2pm. The text is available at the center, so we encourage you to come and study this important practice with us!

Our Tuesday book study is now reading What Makes You Not a Buddhist, by Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse. As always, we will read sections of the book in class and discuss, and we invite everyone to attend!

Read the original here:
Welcome to Losel Maitri Tibetan Buddhist Center

Written by simmons

October 21st, 2015 at 11:54 am

Posted in Buddhism

Birmingham Buddhist Centre | meditation and buddhism classes …

Posted: at 11:54 am


without comments

Introduction to Meditation and Buddhism Courses

Want to learn to meditate and find out about Buddhism and how you can incorporate Buddhist ethics and practices into your life?

more >>

Opportunites to learn more and meet others practising this path in their lives.

more >>

Download or stream free talks on Buddhism and meditation here >>

Interested in learning to meditate? We have regular sessions with full instruction in the two meditation practices we teach.

more >>

Specifically for 18-35s: a group that meets regularly for meditation, discussion and socialising.

more >>

The Buddhist Centre runs on generosity. If you would like to help cover the cost of our work you can pay by credit or debit card if you click here.

Want to feel healthier, fitter, more supple? Come along to our yoga classes all levels of ability welcome.

more >>

We have festivals, concerts and other events at the Buddhist Centre. Click on the link below to see whats coming up.

more >>

Come on a weekend or week-long retreat led by members of the Triratna Buddhist Order.

more >>

Link:
Birmingham Buddhist Centre | meditation and buddhism classes ...

Written by simmons

October 21st, 2015 at 11:54 am

Posted in Buddhism

Minnesota Zen Meditation Center

Posted: October 20, 2015 at 11:42 am


without comments

We welcome all who want to learn more about Zen Buddhist meditation. Our vibrant community is committed to Zen practice and teachings, and offers daily sitting meditation, weekly classes and lectures, and monthly intensive meditation retreats.

Our Center is located on the eastern shore of Lake Calhoun in south Minneapolis. People from all over the region come to here to listen to talks by teachers, attend classes and workshops, participate in retreats, attend services, and, most importantly, to do sitting meditation (zazen).

A good place to begin would be Introduction to Zen Meditation on Sunday mornings or Tuesday evenings. Each session includes meditation instruction and teaching on how meditation and Zen relate to daily life.

For Introduction to Zen Meditation join us any Sunday morning or Tuesday night and then return the next three Sundays/Tuesdays to complete the four-week cycle. The four parts are not sequential, so you may attend them in any order. You are welcome to attend as many sessions as you like, but attend all four for the best overview. These classes are open to all with no pre-registration necessary. Admission is first come, first served, and the class often fills. We advise that you come a few minutes early. Those who can't attend the Introduction generally stay and enjoy the talk in the main hall instead. Donations are gratefully accepted.

The class meets every Sunday from 10:00 11:00 a.m. and each Tuesday 7:30 8:30 p.m. Participants are welcome to stay for tea and social hour after the class.

If you are visiting MZMC to fulfill a class requirement, we suggest attending the talk in the main hall on Sunday at 10 a.m. or Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

Nothing Holy About It: The Zen of Being Just Who You Are by Guiding Teacher Tim Burkett published by Shambhala Publications in April 2015

Tim's new book was published this spring. He is currently touring the Bay Area for the month of September. Click here for more information on the tour and the book. Click here to listen to his recent talk on the book at San Francisco Zen Center. Click here to order the book.

Sunday mornings and Tuesday evenings are good times to become familiar with the MZMC community. The weekly talk (same talk is given Sunday morning at 10 a.m. and Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m.) provides continued learning about Zen Buddhism and offers you a chance to know the teachers more fully. You are invited to join us for any part of the Sunday and Tuesday schedules. We hope to see you then!

Sunday Morning Schedule 9:10 Meditation 9:30 Short Stretch Break 9:50 Meditation Ends 10:00 Introduction to Zen Meditation 10:00 Sunday Talk Click here for a list of Sunday/Tuesday Speakers 11:00 Tea/Social Time (except during retreats)

Tuesday Evening Schedule 6:40 Meditation 7:00 Short Stretch Break 7:20 Meditation Ends 7:30-8:15 Tuesday Talk Click here for a list of Sunday/Tuesday Speakers 7:30-8:30 Introduction to Zen Meditation 8:15-9:00 Tea/Social Time (except during retreats)

Click here to listen to Sunday/Tuesday Talks online

Subscribe to our Sunday/Tuesday Talks podcast using iTunes.

To subscribe to our Sunday/Tuesday Talks podcast with another service, use this rss feed:http://mnzencenter.org/audio/rss.xml

Activites are listed here on the "Home" page for convenience but can also be found under the "Schedule" tab and on the calendar.

Dharma Family Sundays Coordinated by Susan Nelson Second Sunday of each month 11:45 am 12:45 pm, with tea and social time at 11:00 am This group will not meet when retreats are taking place. Please check the calendar. By donation; no preregistration required

Dharma Family Sundays is for parents and children of all ages to come together to share the dharma with stories, meditation, songs, activities and food. This is a time for parents to share their practice place with the rest of the family and for children and parents to make connections with others in the Zen community, (not limited to members of MZMC).

Fall Practice Period: Nothing Holy About It (Tim's new book!) with Tim Burkett and Wanda Isle Wednesday evenings, October 7 November 18, and Monday, November 23, 7:15 8:45 p.m. (There is also a morning option for those who cannot attend Wednesday evenings: Thursdays, 7:30 9:00 a.m.) Cost: $145 members; $180 nonmembers Register Please register five days in advance.

In this practice period (led by Tim Burkett with the assistance of Wanda Isle) we will read and reflect on the first half of Tim's book, Nothing Holy About It. In the first two chapters we'll reflect on ways in which our longing for a timeless joy may be transformed into a powerful aspiration to realize and manifest this joy. In chapter 3 we'll discuss how this penetrating joy is actually an aspect of who we already are. Then in chapters 4 and 5 we'll see how the path to joy leads right through the fear body. But we don't have to get stuck there. Chapters 6 & 7 offer ways to move through the fear body to the abiding joy that is always with us.

Participants are expected to attend the eight weekly meetings, commit to regular zazen practice, attend at least one day of retreat and one work practice day, read the assigned text(s), and have regular meetings with an assigned practice partner.

Zen Forms and Etiquette with Bussho Lahn Choose one the following dates: October 16 or November 29 5:30 6:30 p.m. Suggested donation: $10 Register Please register five days in advance.

This class is one-hour long. The same information is covered each time. We will cover the basics of traditional Zen forms: bows, entries and exits, walking meditation, etc. This offering is designed for the newcomer who would like an overview of forms to help them be more comfortable when joining us for morning zazen or one of our sesshins. It is also a great refresher course for those more experienced.

Sitting with Sutras: A Contemplative Afternoon with Bussho Lahn Saturday, October 10, 12 3 pm Cost: $30 members; $35 non-members Register Please register five days in advance.

Spend a weekend afternoon in silent contemplation with some of the great words of Buddhism. We'll read short passages from the sutras, listening deeply as we prepare to enter into silence with them. Short periods of shared reading will be followed by longer intervals of meditative silence as we quiet our ordinary minds in order to immerse ourselves in the experience underlying the words.

Half-Day Sesshin October 17 with Bussho Lahn Hours: 5:45 am noon Cost: $30 members; $40 nonmembers Register Please register five days in advance.

This brief immersion in the traditional sesshin schedule is a good opportunity to become familiar with the forms, stay in practice, or brush up after some time away. This morning includes an orientation, zazen, kinhin (walking meditation), liturgy, a formal vegetarian breakfast using oryoki bowls, and one-to-one meetings with the teacher.

Fall Work Practice Afternoons Sunday, October 18, 11:45 am 3:45 pm Saturday, November 7, 11 am 3 pm

Work practice is our opportunity to give our efforts to the community by taking care of the space we share. In work practice we can express the essence of Zen, the delight of mindful activity, and appreciation of the manifest world.

Work practice afternoons include a vegetarian lunch or snack, so please let us know in advance if you plan to attend. Thank you. info@mnzencenter.org

One-Day Retreat November 14 with Guy Gibbon Hours: 8 am 5 pm Cost: $50 members; $65 nonmembers Register Please register five days in advance.

One-Day Retreats are conducted in a contemporary context, without the formal elements involved in sesshin. They include walking and sitting meditation, a dharma talk, one-to-one meetings with the teacher, a vegetarian buffet lunch, and work practice. Meditators at all levels of experience are invited.

Rohatsu Sesshin 2015 with Tim Burkett Seven-day option: Sun., November 29, 7 pm Sun., Dec. 6, 4 pm Five-day option: Wed., December 2, 5:45 am Sun., Dec. 6, 4 pm Two-day option: Sat., December 5, 5:45 am Sun. Dec. 6, 4 pm One-day option: Sat., December 5, 5:45 am Sat. Dec. 5, 9 pm Hours for full days: 5:45 am 9:00 pm

Cost for seven days: member $335; nonmember $435 Cost for five days: member $250; nonmember $325 Cost for two days: member $100; nonmember $130 Cost for one day: member $50; nonmember $65 Register Please register five days in advance.

Rohatsu (Buddha's Enlightenment) sesshin is arguably the year's most important event for Zen Buddhists. All over the world we sit in meditation, celebrating Buddha's awakening to an intimacy with all life as our own awakening. This formal retreat includes zazen, kinhin (walking meditation), liturgy, dharma talks, formal vegetarian meals using oryoki, dokusan (one-to-one meetings with the teachers), and work practice. All participants should attend the orientation on Sunday, November 29, at 7 p.m.

The MZMC primer series is composed of short overviews of topics of interest in Soto Zen Buddhism and in Buddhism more generally. The series is intended to give readers a comprehensive, but brief, introduction to a topic. Click here for more information and to download primers.

Read more from the original source:
Minnesota Zen Meditation Center

Written by simmons

October 20th, 2015 at 11:42 am

Posted in Buddhism

Buddhism – Kadampa Buddhism

Posted: October 2, 2015 at 10:48 am


without comments

Buddhism is Buddhas teachings and the inner experiences or realizations of these teachings.

These have a timeless and universal relevance and can be practiced by anyone in any culture, regardless of race, gender, or age.

By practicing Buddhas teachings, or Dharma, we protect ourself from suffering and problems. All the problems we experience during daily life originate in ignorance, and the method for eliminating ignorance is to practice Dharma.

Practicing Dharma is the supreme method for improving the quality of our human life because the quality of life depends not upon external development or material progress, but upon the inner development of peace and happiness.

Buddha first gave his teachings over two and half thousand years ago. Since that time they have been preserved in a pure form and passed down from Teacher to disciple in an unbroken lineage that is still alive today.

Thanks to the kindness of these previous Teachers, we are able to listen to and practice exactly the same Dharma as Buddha originally taught.

Use the menu to find out more.

Read more:
Buddhism - Kadampa Buddhism

Written by simmons

October 2nd, 2015 at 10:48 am

Posted in Buddhism


Page 21234..1020..»